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Full text of "Sessional Papers 18 to 27, 1893"

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SESSIONAL PAPERS 



Univexstte d'Ottawa 
VOLUME lO nOCBMBHTS OFF^L- 

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATION^ 
University oi OtWtVa 



THIRD SESSION OF THE SEVENTH PARLIAMENT 



^ oWa rsitas 
OttaV>e<f 9 ^ 



DOMINION OF CAJST^DA 



SESSION 1893 




VOLUME XXVI. 



56 Victoria. Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. A. 1893 

t& See also Numerical List, page 3. 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



SESSIONAL PAPERS 

OF THE 

PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



THIRD SESSION, SEVENTH PARLIAMENT, 1893 

Note. — In order to find quickly whether a paper has been printed or not, the mark (n.p.) has been 
inserted when not printed ; papers not so marked, it may be understood, are printed. Further information 
concerning each paper is to be found in the List, commencing on page 3, 



Adulteration of Food 66 

Agriculture, Annual Report 7 

Archives, Canadian 7ft 

Auditor- General, Annual Report 1 



Banks, Chartered 3 

Banks, Unclaimed Balances in 3ft 

Baptisms, Marriages and Burials (n.p.) 75 

Beet-root Sugar (n.p.) 34 

Bonds and Securities (n.p. ) 36 

Bonne Esperance, Fishery Officer for (n,p.) 20/t 

Boundaries of Quebec 43 

Bounties, Fishing (n.p.) 20, 20a, 206, 201 

Bridge Across the Richelieu River. . . . (n.p.) 44 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co. (n.p.) 55 

British Columbia Fishery Commission 10c 

British Columbia Quarantine Station . . . (n.p.) 68 

C 

Canadian Cattle, Scheduling of 50 

Canadian Fishermen, Treatment endured by 



(n.p.) 



20; 

Canadian Pacific Railway 30 

Canadian Pacific Railway, Lands sold by 30a 

Canal Statistics 9a 

Caron, Sir A. P., Charges against 27 

Census of Canada, 1890-91 Vol. A. 

Census of Canada, 1890-91 (n.p.) 46, 46a 

Central Ontario Railway Co (n.p. ) 62 

Chartered Banks 3 

Cheese (n.p. ) 70 

Cholera, Prevention of (n.p.) 65 

Civil Service Board of Examiners . . , . 166 

Civil Service Examination (n.p. ) 39 

Civil Service List 16a 

Civil Service, Superannuations 28 



Commander's Certificate, Fishery Protection 

(n.p.) 20 i 

Commercial Relations, Canada 2e 

Commissions to Public Officers 31 

Conference at Washington 52 

Conference, Canada and Newfoundland 20^ 

Cosgrove, John J (n.p.) 216 

Criminal Statistics Jc 

Culverts on Railways (n.p.) 61 

Customs Department (n.p.) 41 

Custom-house, Montreal , (n.p. ) 77 

I> 

Dividends, Unpaid in Banks . 3a 

Dominion Lands 29 

E 

Ellis, Wm (n.p.) 76 

English Financial Agents . (n.p.) 53 

Esquimalt, Defences of 32 

Estimates , 2 

Exchequer Court, Rules 25 

Excise, etc. 6 

Expenses, Unforeseen (n.p. ) 23 

Experimental Farms, Annual Report 7% 

Experimental Farms, Reports (n.p.) 40 

Exports and Imports (n. p. ) 64 

F 

Financial Agents of Canada (n.p.) 53 

Fisheries Statements and Inspectors' Reports. . 10a 

Fishery Commission, British Columbia 10c 

Fishery Officer for Bonne Esperance (n.p.) 20h 

Fishery Overseers (n.p.) 20k 

Fishery Protection, Commander's Certificate 
■) 



(n.p. 



20 i 



Fishing Bounties (n.p.) 20, 20a, 206, 201 

Fishing Licenses (n.p. ) 54 

Food, Adulteration of 06 

French Treaty 51, 51a, 516, 51c 



56 Victoria. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1893 



Geological Survey Report 13a 

Governor-General 49, 69 

Governor-General's Warrants 22 

11 

Hackett, Edward (n.p.) 48 

Harkaway, Post Office (n.p. ) 59a 

Herchmer, Lawrence, Charges against. . .(n.p.) 47 

Horses, Trade in . . .' . • 2a* 



Imports and Exports (n.p. ) 64 

Indian Affairs, Annual Report 14 

Inland Revenue, Annual Report 6 

Insurance, Annual Report 4 

Insurance Companies 4a, 46 

Intercolonial Railway : 

Time-table of Passenger Trains (n.p.) 26 

Working Expenses 26a 

Revenue. 266 

Atkinson, C. A (n.p.) 26c 

Running Privileges (n.p. ) 26^ 

Interior, Annual Report 13 



Justice, Annual Report. 



18 



K 



Kingston Penitentiary . 



(n.p.) 38 



• (n.p.) 



60 

29 

21a 

17 

54 



Labrie, Chas. I 

Lands, Dominion .... 

Lesage, Edouard (n.p.) 

Library of Parliament, Annual Report 

Licenses to U. S. Fishing Vessels (n.p.) 

Lobster Industry 10d 

Lurcher Shoal (n.p.) 72 

M 

Manitoba School Acts 33, 33a, 336, 33c, 33d 

Marine and Fisheries, Annual Report 10 

Militia and Defence, Annual Report 19 

Militia, Establishment Lists 19a 

Mines and Minerals 63 

Miscellaneous Unforeseen Expenses (n.p.) 23 

Montreal Custom-house (n. p. ) 77 

Mounted Police, Annual Report 15 

Murphy, O. E (n.p.) 66 

Mc 

McDougall, Lauchlin (n.p. ) 73 

McGreevy, R. H (n.p.) 66 

Mclnty re, Postmaster (n.p.) 21 

McNamee & Co (n.p.) 71 

Newfoundland and Canada, Conference. . . . 20d 

Newfoundland and Canadian Trade 20/ 

Newfoundland Bait Act 20c 



Newfoundland Fishermen (n.p.) 20/ 

North-west Mounted Police 15 

Notre Dame du Rosaire Post Office (n.p.) 59 



Oyster Fisheries of Canada 106 

P 

P. E. I. Tunnel (n.p.) 58 

Pig Iron 37, 37a, 376 

Postmaster-General, Annual Report 12 

Prosser, Wm (n.p.) 20c 

Public Accounts, Annual Report 2 

Public Officers' Commissions 31 

Public Printing and Stationery 1M 

Public Works, Annual Report 8 



" Quadra, " Steamer ... .(n.p.) 74 

Quarantine Station, British Columbia (n.p.) 68 

Quebec, Boundaries of 43 

Quelle Oriental Railway (n.p.) 45 

R 

Railway Culverts (n.p. ) 61 

Railways and Canals, Annual Report 9 

Railway Statistics.'. 96 

Receipts and Payments. ..(n.p.) 24, 24a, 246, 24c, 24d 

Richelieu River, Bridge across the (n.p.) 44 

Rouleau, F. F (n.p.) 20g 

Royal Commission, Liquor Traffic (n.p.) 67 

Royal Commission, Sir A. P. Caron ... 27 

Rules, I]xchequer Court 25 



Scheduling of Canadian Cattle 50 

Secretary of State, Annual Report 16 

Small-pox in British Columbia (n.p. ) 56 

Soulanges Canal (n.p.) 42 

Steam-boat Inspection H 

St. Sebastien Post Office (n.p.) 596 

Superannuations, Civil Service., 28 

Supplementary Estimates 2 



Telegraphic System of the Empire 35 

Trade and Navigation, Annual Report 5 

Trade and Trade Openings 2 c 

Trades Unions (n. p. ) 57 

Treaty with France 51, 51a, 516, 51c 

Trudeau, T (n.p.) 28a 

Tunnel between P.E.I, and Mainland . . .(n.p.) 58 

IT 

Unforeseen Expenses, Miscellaneous (n.p.) 23 

W 

Warrants, Governor-General's 22 

Washington Conference 52 

Weights, Measures and Gas 6a 

Welland Canal (n.p.) 76 

Wetmore, Justice, Report of (n.p.) 47 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



See also Alphabetical Index, page 1. 

LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, with their Titles at full length ; the Dates when 
Ordered and when Presented, to both Houses of Parliament ; the Name of 
the Member who m,oved for each Sessional Paper, and ivhelher it is ordered 
to be Printed or Not Printed. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME A. 

Census of Canada, 1890-91. First Volume Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME i. 

1. Report of the Auditor General on Appropriation Accounts for the year ended 30th June, 1892. Pre- 
sented 27th January, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2. 

3. Public Accounts' of Canada for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. Presented 27th January, 1893, 
by Hon. G. E. Foster. 2a. Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1894 ; presented 30th 
January, 1893. 2b. Supplementary Estimates for the financial year ending 30th June, 1893 ; 
presented 17th February, 1893. 2-1&* Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 
30th June, 1893 ; presented 16th March, 1893. 2c. Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 
30th June, 1894 ; presented 27th March, 1893 Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

2d. Trade with Great Britain— Horses Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

He. Commercial Relations, Canada, No. 1. Reports upon Trade and Trade Openings in Great Britain and 
other countries, to 31st December, 1892 Printed for both distribution and sessioncd papers. 

3. List of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of Canada, as on the 31st December, 1892. Presented 

24th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3. 

3a. Report of dividends remaining unpaid and amounts, or balances, in respect to which no transactions have 
taken place, or upon which no interest has been paid for five years or upwards prior to 31st Dec- 
ember, 1892, in chartered banks of Canada Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

4. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance for the year ending 31st December, 1892. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

4a. Preliminary abstract of the business of the Canadian Life Insurance Companies for the year ending 
31st December, 1892. Presented 20th February, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 
46. Abstract of statements of Insurance Companies in Canada for the year ending 31st December, 1892. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

li .3 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4. 

5. Tables of the Trade and Navigation of Canada for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. Presented 

27th January, 1893, by Mr. Wood (Brockville.). Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

6. Inland Revenues of Canada. Part I., Excise, &c, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. Presented 

26th January, 1893, by Mr. Wood, (Brockville). .Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

6«. Inland Revenues of Canada. Part II., Inspection of Weights, Measures and Gas, for the fiscal year 

ended 30th June, 1892 Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

66. Inland Revenues of Canada. Part III., Adulteration of Food, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 
1892. Presented 27th January, 1893, by Mr. Wood (Brockville). 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5. 

7. Report of the Minister of Agriculture for Canada, for the calendar year 1892. Presented 23rd Feb- 

ruary, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

7a. Report on Canadian Archives, 1892 Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

7b. Report of the Director and Officers of the Experimental Farms, for the year 1892. Presented 20th 

March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

7c. Criminal Statistics for the year 1892 Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 6. 

8. Annual Report of the Minister of Public Works, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. Presented 

20th February, 1893, by Hon. J. A. Ouimet. . .Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

9. Annual Report of the Minister of Railways and Canals, for the past fiscal year, from the 1st July, 1891, 

to the 30th June, 1892. Presented 10th February, 1893, by Hon. J. G. Haggart. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

9a. Canal Statistics for Season of Navigation, 1892. Presented 10th February, 1893, by Hon. J. G. Haggart. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

96. Railway Statistics, and Capital, Traffic and Working Expenditure of the Railways of Canada, for 
1892. Presented 29th March, 1893, by Hon. J. G. Haggart. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 7. 

10. Annual Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. 

Presented 27th January, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

10a. Fisheries Statements and Inspectors' Reports for the year 1892. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

106. Report on the Oyster Fisheries of Canada, 1892. Presented 30th January, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 
lOc. Report of British Columbia Fishery Commission, 1892. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 
lOvi. Report on the Lobster Industry of Canada, 1892. ..Printed for both distribution and sessioncd papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8. 

11. Report of the Chairman of the Board of Steam-boat Inspection, etc., for calendar year ended 31st 

December, 1892 Printed for both distribution and sessioncd papers. 

VZ. Report of the Postmaster-General of Canada for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. Presented 

3rd February, 1893, by Sir A. P. Caron Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

1H. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the year 1892. Presented 22nd March, 1893, 

by Hon. T. M. Daly Printed for both distribution and sessioncd papers. 

Ilia. Summary Report of the Geological Survey Department for the year ended 1892. 

Printed for both distribution and sessioncd papers. 

4: 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1898 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9. 

14. Annual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs for the year ended 31st December, 1892. Pre* 

sented 7th March, 1893, by Hon. T. M. Daly. . . .Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

15. Report of the Commissioner of the North-west Mounted Police Force, 1892. Presented 3rd March, 

1893, by Hon. W. B. Ives Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

10. Report of the Secretary of State of Canada for the year ended 31st December, 1892. Presented 6th 
March, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

16a. Civil Service List of Canada, 1892. Presented 9th February, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan. 

. Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

106. Report of the Board of Civil Service Examiners, for the year ended 31st December, 1892. Pre- 
sented 29th March, 1893, by Hon. J. C. Patterson. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

Kid. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery of Canada, for the year ended 
30th June, 1892, with a partial report for services during six months ending 31st December, 1892. 
Presented 28th February, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

17. Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament, on the state of the Library of Parliament. Presented 
26th January, 1893, by Hon. Mr. Speaker Printed for sessioncd papers only. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 10. 

1H. Report of the Minister of Justice as to Penitentiaries in Canada, for the year ended 30th J-une, 1892. 
Presented 27th January, 1893, by Sir John Thompson. 

Printed for both distribution and sessioned papers^ 

10. Annual Report of the Department of Militia and Defence of Canada, for the half-year ended 30th 
June, 1892. Presented 31st January, 1893, by Hon. J. C. Patterson. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

10a. Establishment Lists of the Active Militia for the financial year 1893-94. Presented 25th March, 1893. 
by Hon. J. C. Patterson -.Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

20. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd March, 1892, for a return showing the 
number and names of men and vessel-owners applying for bounties for the years 1889, 1890 and 
1891, and not receiving the same, giving the reasons why such applications were not granted ; also 
whether any were refused and afterwards granted, the names, amounts and reasons given why 
such were afterwards granted ; also all papers and correspondence since 1888 in reference to the 
bounty system and in regard to applications granted and ungranted. Presented 27th January, 
1893. — Mr. Bowers Not printed. 

20a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 27th May, 1891, for a return giving a compara- 
tive statement for the years 1882 to 1891, inclusive, (by province) of : (a) Total number of bounty 
claims received by department, (b) Total number paid, (c) Number of vessels, tonnage, and 
number of men entitled to bounty in each year, (d) Number of boats among which bounty was 
distributed, and number of men engaged in boat-fishing receiving bounty, (t) Total number of 
men receiving bounty. '(/) Total annual payments of fishing bounty. Presented 30th January, 
1893.— Mr. Flint Not printed. 

20b. Statement in reference to fishing bounty payments for 1891-92, required by chapter 96 of the Revised 
Statutes of Canada. Presented 6th February, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan ... Not printed. 

20c. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 30th May, 1892, for a copy of all correspondence, 
papers and reports relating to the investigation into the conduct of William Prosser, fishery over- 
. seer for the district fronting the county of Essex, on lake Erie, and his dismissal from office. Pre- 
sented 8th February, 1893.— Mr. Allan Not printed. 

20d. Copy of the proceedings of the conference recently held at Halifax between delegates from the gov- 
ernments of Canada and Newfoundland upon the fishery question and other questions between the 
two governments. Presented 8th February, 1893, by Sir John Thompson. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

5 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 10— Continued. 

"ZOe. Further papers respecting the enforcement by the Newfoundland authorities against Canadian vessels 
of the Newfoundland act respecting the sale of bait to foreign fishing vessels. Presented 9th 
February, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan, . . Printed for sessional papers only. 

20f. Further papers respecting the several questions at issue between the dominion of Canada and the 
colony of Newfoundland. Presented 13th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

20g. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 27th 
July, 1891, for copies of all documents, petitions and letters in relation to the fishing rights of 
F. F. Rouleau, Esq., advocate, of Rimouski, which said rights he and his predecessors have always 
exercised on his property at Rimouski. Presented 13th March, 1893. — Mr.Choquette. 

Not printed. 

20h, Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 1st March, 1893, for copies of all correspondence 
between the government and the Quebec board of trade, respecting the appointment of a fishery 
officer in the place of Mr. W. H. Whitely, for the Bonne Esperance division, from Checatica to 
Blancs Sablons. Presented 29th March, 1893.— Mr. Joncas Not printed- 

itOi. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th Maach, 1893, for a return showing a copy 
of a certificate of qualification held by each of the commanders of the fishery protection service 
last season, as follows: Commander O. G. V. Spain, "Acadia;" W. H. Kent, "Agnes Mac- 
donald;" E. Dun, "Bayfield;" Geo. M.May, "Constance;" J. H. Pratt, " Dream ; " Wm. 
Wakeham, "La Canadienne ; " A. Finlayson, "Stanley;" C. T. Knowlton, "Vigilant." Pre- 
sented 29th March, 1893.— Mr. McMullen . . . Not printed. 

3©/. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 20th 
March, 1893, for copies of all documents, reports and correspondence between the government and 
the Quebec Board of Trade, or any other person, in relation to the treatment endured by Canadian 
fishermen from Newfoundland fishermen along the Canadian Labrador coast. Presented 30th 
March, 1893.— Mr. Joncas Not printed. 

20k. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th March, 1893, for : 1. Copies of instructions 
issued to the fishery overseers of Berthier, Maskinonge, St. Maurice, Champlain, Nicolet, 
Yamaska and Richelieu, since 1st January, 1892, and of all correspondence on the subject between 
the Government and the said fishery overseers ; or between the government and any other persons* 
from 1st January, 1892, up to this date, in relation to such instructions and the enforcement there- 
of. 2. A statement of fishing licenses issued in the counties aforesaid during the years 1891 and 1892, 
separately. 3. A statement of the quantity and value of the various kinds of fish taken in the 
said counties — separately — during the years 1891 and 1892. Presented 30th March, 1893. — Mr. 
Bruneav. Not printed. 

HOI. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for a return of all persons 
receiving fishery bounties in the counties of Victoria and Guysboro', N.S., for the year 1892, with 
amount paid each. Presented 30th March, 1893. — Mr. Fraser Not printed. 

itl. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 2nd May, 1892, for a return giving all papers, 
letters, petitions, applications, and every other document relating to the dismissal of the post- 
master of Mclntyre, and the appointment of his successor.- Presented 27th January, 1893.— Mr. 
Landerkin Not printed. 

21". Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for copies of all letters, 
correspondence, petitions and other documents received and exchanged by the government, re- 
specting the dismissal of Edouard Lesage, postmaster of St. Leon, in the cqunty of Maskinonge, 
and to any appointment or appointments made to the position since the discharge of the said 
< ifficia .1. I 'resented Kith March, 1893.— Mr. Lcgris Not printed. 

£1/,. Return ,to an address of the Senate, to his excellency the Governor-General, dated the 7th March, 
1893, f«>i copies of the order in council, information, evidence and papers upon which the dismissal 
of John .1. Cosgrove, an officer of the inland revenue department, proceeded and was determined. 
I 'resented 23rd March, 1893.— Hon, Mr. O'Donohue Not printed. 

tt'Z. Statement of Governor-General's Warrants issued since last session of parliament, in accordance with 
tlif Consolidated Revenue and Audit Act, section 32, subsection b. Presented 30th January, 

1893, by Hon. (1. K. Foster Printed for distribution only. 

6 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 10— Concluded. 

23. Statement of expenditure on account of miscellaneous unforeseen expenses. Presented 30th January, 

1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Not pr\ <>t, <l. 

24. Ten days' statement of the receipts and payments of Canada, from the 11th to the 20th January, 

1892, and from the 11th to the 20th January, 1803. Presented 30th January, 1893, by Hon. I ;. B. 
Foster Not printed. 

24«. Statement of the receipts and payments of Canada, 1891-92 and 1892-93, to 31st January. Presented 
6th February, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Not printed. 

246. Statement of the receipts and payments of Canada, 1891-92 and 1892-93, to 10th February. Presented 
17th February, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Not printed. 

24c. Statement of the receipts and payments of Canada, 1891-92 and 1892-93, to 10th March. Presented 
15th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Not printed. 

24c/. Statement of the receipts and payments of Canada, 1891-92 and 1892-93, to 20th March. Presented 
21st March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Not printed. 

25. Rules of the Exchequer Court of Canada in respect to any proceeding that may be had or taken in 

the Exchequer Court of Canada to impeach any patent issued under " The Patent Act. " Pre- 
sented 27th January, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan Printed for sessional papers only. 

26. Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 9th July, 1892, for 

a copy of the latest time-table adopted to govern the running of passenger trains on the Inter- 
colonial Railway. Presented 30th January, 1893.— Hon. Mr. Potver Not printed. 

26a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th February, 1893, for a statement of the work- 
ing expenses of the Intercolonial Railway for the year 1890-91 and also for the year 1891-92, and 
from the 1st July, 1892, to the 31st December, inclusive, under the following headings, viz. : — 
Locomotive power, car expenses, maintenance of way and works, station expenses, general 
charges, car mileage. Presented 27th February, 1893.— Sir Hector Langevin. 

Printed/or distribution only. 

266. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th February, 1893, for a statement showing 
the revenue of the Intercolonial Railway for the years 1890-91 and 1891-92, and from the 1st July, 
1892, to the 31st December, inclusive, under the following headings, viz. : — Passengers, freight, 
mails and sundries ; giving also the number of passengers and the number of tons of freight carried 
in each of the above-named years. Presented 27th February, 1893. — Sir Hector Langevin. 

Printed for distribution only. 

26c. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th March, 1893, for copies of all correspondence, 
reports and other documents relative to the reduction in rank of C. A. Atkinson from conductor 
to brakesman, on or about October, 1887. Presented 30th March, 1893. — Mr. Wood {Westmore- 
land) Not printed. 

26(Z. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1892, for copies of all letters,. 
, telegrams and correspondence relating to the use by the Canadian Pacific Railway of running 
privileges over the Intercolonial Railway between Halifax and St. John ; and copies of all agree- 
ments between the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Intercolonial Railway, or any department 
or officer of the government of Canada, relating Jo the running privileges given to the Canadian 
Pacific Railway over the Intercolonial Railway and to the payments to be made therefor ; and 
also of all agreements for the payments by the Intercolonial Railway to the Canadian Pacific 
Railway for the cars and engines of the latter run over the Intercolonial Railway. Presented 
1st April, 1893.— Mr. Davies Not printed. 

27. Copy of the Report of the Commissioners appointed by Royal Commission to take evidence as to the 

truth or falsity of certain charges made against Sir Adolphe P. Caron, member of the House of 
Commons and of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, with copies of the evidence and exhibits 
thereto pertaining. Presented 6th February, 1893, by Sir John Thompson. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

7 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 11. 

28. Statement of all superannuations and retiring allowances in the civil service, giving the name and 
rank of each person superannuated or retired, his salary, age and length of service ; his allowance 
and cause of retirement, whether vacancy has been filled by promotion or new appointment, etc., 
for year ended 31st December, 1892. Presented 7th February, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

2&a. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 1st 
March, 1893, for copies of all correspondence, papers or orders in council relating Co the superan- 
nuation or retirement of Mr. T. Trudeau, late deputy of the minister of railways and canals. Pre- 
sented 21st March, 1893.— Mr. Edgar Not printed. 

89. Return of orders in council of 1892 relating to the department of the interior, in accordance with 
clause 91 of the Dominion Lands Act, chapter 54, Revised Statutes of Canada. Presented 9th 
February, 1893, by Hon. T. M. Daly. Printed for sessional papers only. 

30. Return under resolution of the 20th February, 1882, in so far as the same is furnished by the depart- 

ment of the interior, respecting the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Presented 9th Feb- 
ruary, 1893, by Hon. T. M. Daly Printed for sessional papers only. 

30«. List of all lands sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company from the 1st October, 1891, to the 
1st October last. Presented 9th February, 1893, by Hon. T. M. Daly. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

31. List of public officers to whom commissions have issued under chapter 19 of the Revised Statutes of 

Canada, during the past year, 1892. Presented 9th February, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan. 

Printed in No. 16. 

S'Z. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 17th 
March, 1892, for copy of all correspondence between the imperial government and the Canadian 
government concerning the defences of Esquimalt. Presented 10th February , 1893. — Mr. Laurier. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

33. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated Oth 
February, 1893, for copy of all petitions, memorials, appeals, and of any other documents addressed 
to his excellency in council, since the 15th March, 1892, relating to the Manitoba School Acts of 
1890 and to section 22 of the " Manitoba Act ''and section 93 of the "British North America Act." 
Also copy of all reports to and of all orders in council in reference to the same. Also copies of 
all correspondence in connection therewith. Presented 10th February, 1893. — Mr. LaRiviere. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

33a. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 6th 
February, 1893, for a copy of the judgment of the judicial committee of her majesty's privy council 
in the appealed case of Barrett vs. the City of Winnipeg, commonly known as the "Manitoba 
School Case." Also copy of factums, reports and other documents in connection therewith. Pre- 
sented 14th February, 1893. — Mr. LaRiviere Printed for both distribution and sessional pajecrs. 

336. Further return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, 
dated 6th February, 1893, for a copy of the judgment of the judicial committee of her majesty's 
privy council in the appealed case of Barrett vs. the City of Winnipeg, commonly known a.s the 
" Manitoba School Case." Also copy of factums, reports and other documents in connection 
therewith. Presented 20th February, 1893.— Mr. LaRiviere. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

33c. Supplementary return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-Gen- 
eral, dated 6th February, 1893, on the subject of the Manitoba School Acts of 1890, with a certified 
copy of a report of a committee of the honourable the privy council, approved by his excellency 
the Governor-General in council on 22nd February, 1893, relative to the settlement of important 
questions of law concerning certain statutes of the province of Manitoba relating to education- 
Presented 1st March, 1893. — Mr. LaRiviere Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

SSd. Partial return to an address of tin: Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 3rd Feb- 
ruary, 1893, for: 1. A copy of the deliberations, resolutions and ordinances of the former council 
oi Assiniboia, relating to educational matters within its jurisdiction as it existed on the banks of 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 11— Continued. 

the Red River before the creation of the province of Manitoba. 2. A statement of the amounts 
paid by the said council of Assiniboia for the maintenance of schools, showing the persons to whom 
such payments were made, the schools for which such amounts were paid, and the religious denomi- 
nation to which such schools belonged. 3. A statement of the amounts paid by the Hudson's 

Bay Company or by its agents, to the schools then existing in tVie territories forming to-day the 
province of Manitoba. 4. A copy of all memoranda and instructions serving as basis for the 
negotiations as a result of which Manitoba became one of the provinces of the confederation ; 
together with a copy of the minutes of the deliberations of the persons charged, on both parts, to 
settle the conditions of the creation of the province of Manitoba and of its entrance into the con- 
federation ; and also a copy of all memoranda, returns and orders in council, establishing such 
conditions of entrance, or serving as a basis for the preparation of "The Manitoba Act." 5. A 
copy of the despatches and instructions from the imperial government to the government of 
Canada on the subject of the entrance of the province of Manitoba into the confederation, com- 
prising therein the recommendations of the imperial government concerning the rights and privi- 
leges of the population of the territories, and the guarantees of protection to be accorded to the 
acquired rights, to the property, to the customs and to the institutions of that population by the 
government of Canada, in the settlement of the difficulties which marked that period of the history 
of the Canadian west. 6. A copy of the acts passed by the legislature of Manitoba relating to 
education in that province, and especially of the first act passed on this subject after the entrance 
of the said province of Manitoba into the confederation, and of the laws existing upon the same 
subject in the said province immediately before the passing of the acts of 1890, relating to the 
public schools and relating to the department of education. 7. A copy of all regulations with 
respect to schools passed by the government of Manitoba or by the advisory board in virtue of the 
laws passed in 1890, b}' the legislature of Manitoba, relating to public schools and the department 
of education. 8. A copy of all correspondence, petitions, memoranda, resolutions, briefs, factums, 
judgments (as well of first instance as in all stages of appeal), relating to the school laws of the said 
province of Manitoba, since the 1st June, 1890, or to the claims of catholics on this subject ;and also 
a copy of all reports to the privy council and of all orders in council relating to the same subject 
since the same date. Presented 30th March, 1893.— Hon. Mr. Bcrnier. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

34. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th April, 1892, for copies of the instructions 

issued to Prof. Saunders when he was directed to inquire into the question of the growing of 
sugar-beet and the manufacture of beet-root sugar in Canada, or since that date up to the time 
when his report was laid before this House. Presented 10th February, 1893— Mr. Beausolcd. 

Not printed. 

35. Return to an Address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated Gth 

February, 1893, for all correspondence, documents, reports and orders in council about a special 
commission to inquire into the most feasible means of completing the telegraphic system of the 
empire. Presented 10th February, 1893 — Sir H. Langevin Printed for sessional papers only. 

36. Detailed statement of all bonds and securities registered in the department of the secretary of state of 

Canada, since last return, 1892, submitted to the parliament of Canada under section 23, chapter 19, 
of the Revised Statutes of Canada. Presented 13th February, 1893, by Hon. J. Costigan. 

Not printed 

37. Statement showing quantity and bounty paid on pig iron produced in Canada since date of last return 

to House of Commons, 16th March, 1892. Presented 16th February, 1893, by Mr. Wallace. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

37a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for return showing the 
quantity of pig iron produced in Canada in the years 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875, 1876, 1877, 
1878, 1879 and 1880, and bounty paid, if any, during those years ; also amount of pig iron 
imported from Great Britain and the United States respectively, and the total amount imported 
during those years. Presented 28th February, 1893. — Mr. Macdonald (Huron). 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

376. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th February, 1893, for a return showing the 
quantity of pig iron produced in Canada in the years 1881, 1882, 1883. 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 
1889, 1890, 1891, 1892 ; and the bounty paid for the production in each of those years. Presented 
13th March, 1893.— Mr. McMullen Printed for sessional papers only. 

9 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 11— Continued. 

38. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for the evidence taken 

before Mr. James G. Moylan, inspector of penitentiaries, in connection with the investigation or 
investigations held by that official at Kingston penitentiary during the past year which resulted in 
the dismissal or resignation of certain officials of that institution. Presented 22nd February, 1893. 
— Mr. Somerville .... . . . . . , Not printed. 

39. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for a copy of the questions 

put and the subjects submitted to the parties who presented themselves for preliminary or qualify- 
ing examination, or both, at tho last examination for the civil service. Presented 23rd February, 
1893. — Sir Hector Langevin Not printed. 

40. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for a return showing the 

number of Experimental Farm Reports published for the year 1891 ; the number published in 
English and French respectively ; the number allotted to each member of the House of Commons 
and Senate, and the number still on hand. Presented 24th February, 1893. — Mr. Grieve. 

Not printed. 

41. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 20th 

February, 1893, for a copy of any report to council made by Hon. J. A. Chapleau when minister 
of customs, on the reorganization of the customs department or recommending changes regarding 
that department. Presented 24th February, 1893. — Mr. Landerkin Not printed. 

45$. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th February, 1893, for a list of the names of all 
tenderers for section eight of the Soulanges canal, also of the residence of each such tenderers, and 
of the amount of each tender. Presented 27th February, 1893. — Sir Hector Langevin. Not printed. 

43. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 2nd 

February, 1893, for copies of all correspondence, memorials, departmental orders and orders in 
council, not already laid before the House, respecting the north-western, northern and eastern 
boundaries of the province of Quebec, together with all reports of surveys or explorations ordered 
thereon or in connection therewith, by the government of Canada, since last session of parliament, 
including the instructions for said surveys or explorations. Presented 27th February, 1893. — Sir 
Hector Langevin Printed for sessional papers only. 

44. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor General, dated 6th 

February, 1893, for a copy of any order in council or other document which gave power to the 
"Stanstead, Shefford and Chambly Railway Co." or their successors "The Vermont Central 
Railway Company " to build a bridge across the Richelieu river at St. John's, P.Q. Presented 
28th February, 1893.— Mr. Bechard Not printed. 

45. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 6th 

February, 1893, for copies of all petitions, correspondence and documents whatsoever respecting 
the granting of a subsidy to the Quebec Oriental Railway. Presented 28th February, 1893. — Mr. 
Vaillancourt Not printed. 

40. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 1st March, 1893, for copies of instructions to 
officers employed in the taking of the third census of Canada, 1891, and copies of forms vised. 
Presented 1st March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster Not printed. 

4G<7. Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 6th February, 1893, 
for information, accompanied with full explanatory remarks, from the officer in charge of the 
direction and superintendence of the last Canadian Census of 1891, on the following points : 
1. Was the enumeration of the French element of the population, in the taking of the Census of 
1891, intended and carried on to convey the same information as was furnished by the previous 
( 'ensus of 1851 and 1861 of the former province of Canada, and the Canadian Census of 1871 and 
1881 ? 2. What was the meaning intended and the interpretation given, in the taking of the 
Census of 1891, to the words French- Canadian and Canadian-French as heading of one of the 
columns of Census Schedule No. 1 ? 3. What is the precise meaning and what is to be understood 
by the various words made use of in the Census Bulletin No. 11, signed George Johnson, statisti- 
cian, namely, the words Nationalities, Nationality, French-speaking, English-speaking, Canadiens- 
Anglais, as part of the new nomenclature adopted? 4. Were there people of French nationality, 
real Frenchmen, excluded from the registration of the French element of the population on account 
of being born outside; of Canada, and were there French people included among the English- 

10 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 11— Continued. 

speaking on accountof being able to speak the English language ? Is there any connection fcx 
such cases and the nomenclature of Bulletin No. 11, and if not, why is it that the simple 
"French, formerly used as meaning the French element, was abandoned, to be variously replaced 
by the words French-speaking, French-Canadians, and so forth ? 5. What were, in addition to the 
printed instructions, the practical explanations and directions given to the officers, commissioners 
and enumerators, as regard* the registration of the French element of the population, or p 
of French origin or nationality ? G. Was the actual enumeration of the French, in 1801, uniform- 
ally carried on throughout, in the various Census districts, sul (districts and divisions? 7. Ate 
there reasons to apprehend, from direct investigation, personal knowledge, or statistical criticism, 
that the figures given as representing the number of French people, are notably deficient in some 
or many returns of the enumeration of 1891? 8. Were the returns delivered by the enumerators 
examined by the commissioners, the officers, and at the central office under the. supervision, the 
responsibility of the superintendent, in view to test their accuracy and to correct apparent errors ? 
9. Was it noticed by some of the officers or the superintendent, that very serious discrepancies 
existed in the return of the French between the Census of 1891 and the statistical series of previous 
censuses, and was thereby trouble taken to investigate the serious question raised by the very 
striking want of concordance ? 10. Is there any rational explanation of the returns of 1891 by which 
the French appear to have met abnormous losses in their number, especially in Nova Scotia, 
Ontario and the Territories ? 11. Are there local or accidental causes capable of explaining the 
vast differences in the multiplication of the French which would have taken place, if the figures of 
the Census of 1891 were correct, between Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, 
for instance ? 12. Was there, at any time, steps taken to ascertain the cause and extent of such 
extraordinary returns ; if not, what was the cause of that omission ; if so, what were the proceed- 
ings adopted, and what the results ? 13. Has the superintendent of the Census of 1891 taken 
notice of the very determined objection to accept the extraordinary figures of 1891, as representing 
the actual number of the French in Canada, and has any serious investigation of this important 
question been undertaken by him ; if so, what are the conclusions arrived at, including the 
statistical criticism involved ? 14. And that the said information include all instructions given to 
the enumerators in the several years, 1881 and 1891, be brought down with the return. Presented 
30th March, 1893.— Hon. Mr. Tasse Not printed. 

47. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 20th 

February, 1893, for a copy of the report of the Honourable Mr. Justice Wetmore, appointed by 
royal commission to inquire into certain charges against Lawrence Herchmer, commissioner of the 
North-west Mounted Police. Presented 3rd March, 1893. — Mr. Bavin Not printed. 

48. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 2<>th 

February, 1893, for a return of all correspondence, telegrams, reports and other papers relating 
to the suspension of Mr. Edward Hackett, Inspector of Fisheries, Prince Edward Island, in the 
year 1892 ; together with copies of the charges made against Mr. Hackett, the authority given to 
the commissioner in Prince Edward Island to take evidence on such charges, together with the 
evidence taken, and the report of the minister of marine thereon, together with any letters, cor- 
respondence, orders or reports relating to the reinstatement of Mr. Hackett. Presented 6th 
March, 1893.— Mr. Davics Not printed. 

49. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 6th 

February, 1893, for a statement showing total amount of money paid by years since confederation 
on each of the following accounts : (a) Salary of Governor-General. (6) Travelling expenses of 
Governor-General, (c) Expenditure on Rideau Hall on capital account and maintenance ; expen- 
diture on Rideau Hall grounds on capital account and maintenance, (d) Expenditure on fur- 
nishings of all kinds for Rideau Hall, (c) Allowance to Governor-General for coal and light. 
(/) Expenditure on any other account in connection with the office of Governor-General. 
(g) Expenditure on any other account in connection with Rideau Hall and grounds, {h) Total 
expenditure of every kind since confederation in connection with the office of Governor-General, 
(i) Total expenditure of every kind in connection with Rideau Hall and grounds. Presented 6th 
March, 1893.— Mr. Mulock Printed for sessional papers only. 

50. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 6th 

February, 1893, for a return of all letters, correspondence, reports and all other matter on record, 
passed between the department of agriculture and the high commissioner of Canada in London, 

11 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 11— Continued. 

the imperial board of trade or any other officials of an authoritative body in reference to the 
scheduling of Canadian cattle in the ports of Great Britain and Ireland, on and after 20th 
October, last. Presented 6th March, 1893. — Mr. Sproule Printed for sessional papers only. 

51. Agreement entered into between Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 

Ireland and the President of the French Republic, regulating the commercial relations between 
Canada and France in respect of customs tariffs. Presented 6th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. 
Foster Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

51a. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, for copies of 
correspondence and other papers in relation to an agreement entered into between Her Majesty 
the Queen of the United Kindom of Great Britain and Ireland and the President of the French 
Republic, regulating the commercial relations between Canada and France in respect of customs 
tariffs. Presented 15th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster, 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

516. Supplementary return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-Gene- 
ral, dated 15th March, 1893, for copies of correspondence and other papers in relation to an 
agreement entered into between Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland and the President of the French Republic, regulating the commercial relations between 
Canada and France in respect of customs tariffs. Presented 20th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. 
Foster Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

51c. Further supplementary return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor- 
General, dated 15th March, 1893, for copies of correspondence and other papers in relation to an 
agreement entered into between Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Ireland and the President of the French Republic, regulating the commercial relations between 
Canada and France in respect of customs tariffs. Presented 25th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. 
Foster Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

52. Papers relating to the conference held at Washington in February, 1892, between the delegates of the 

Canadian government and the secretary of state of the United States upon the several subjects 
therein mentioned. Presented 7th March, 1893, by Hon. G. E. Foster. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

53. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 1st 

March, 1893, for copies of all letters, telegrams and correspondence between the government or any 
member thereof, and the late English financial agents of Canada in London and the Bank of Mon- 
treal in reference to the recent change of agency at London. Presented 7th March, 1893. — 
Sir Richard Catrtwright Not printed. 

54. Copy of an order in council of the 17th January, 1893, authorizing the issue of licenses to United 

States fishing vessels during the year 1893, for the purchase of bait, ice, lines and all other sup- 
plies, the transhipment of catch and shipping of crews. Presented 7th March, 1893, by Hon. 
J. Costigan Not printed. 

55. Statement of the affairs of the British Canadian Loan and Investment Company, on 31st December, 

1892. Also a list of shareholders on the 31st December, 1S92. Presented 30th March, 1893, by 
Hon. Mr. Speaker Not printed. 

5«. Return bo an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 21st February, 1893, 
for copies of all letters, communications and telegrams between the minister of agriculture or any 
official under him, or any other minister or official of the Dominion government, and the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, the British Columbia government, the mayors of the cities of Victoria 
and Vancouver, the Dominion health officers of the ports of Victoria and Vancouver, relating to 
the introduction of small-pox into Victoria and Vancouver, in May and June, 1892, by the mail 
steamers from Japan and China. Presented 9th March, 1893. — Hon. Mr. Mclnnes (Victoria). 

Not printed. 

57. Return of applications for registration under the provisions of chapter 131, Revised Statutes 
n.el,, "An Act respecting Trades Unions." Presented 15th March, 1893, by Hon. J. 

( ' -' igan Not printed. 

12 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 11— Continued. 

5H. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 15th March, 1893, for a statement showing 

in detail the expenditure incurred since last session of parliament, in carrying on the borings 
in the Straits of Northumberland to obtain data as to the probable cost of a tunnel, also for all 
contracts, correspondence, telegrams or papers in anywise relating to such borings or such expen- 
diture. Presented 15th March, 1893.— Mr, Perry Not printed. 

59. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for copies of all petitions, 

letters and documents whatsoever, in relation to the change in the location of the post office of 
Notre Dame du Rosaire. Presented 20th March, 1893. — Mr. Choquctte Not printed. 

59a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th February, 1893, for a return of all petitions, 
documents and letters in relation to a request made for increased mail service at the Harkaway post 
office, during the past six years. Presented 29th March, 1893. — Mr. Landerkin Not printed. 

596. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 1st March, 1893, for copies of all correspondence 
and petitions asking for a change in the post office of St. Sebastien, in the county of Beauce ; and 
of the report of the post office inspector in relation thereto. Presented 29th March, 1893. — Mr. 
Godbout Not printed. 

60. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 1st March, 1893, for copies of all accounts, letters, 

receipts and other documents in relation to the claim of Charles I. Labrie, of Levis, for professional 
service in connection with expropriation, during the construction of the St. Charles Branch. Pre- 
sented 20th March, 1893.— Mr. Fremont Not printed. 

61. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 1st March, 1893, for copies of petitions from 

county councils and other municipal corporations asking that railways under Dominion control 
be compelled to build culverts on natural watercourses crossing their lines, and correspondence re- 
lating thereto. Presented 21st March, 1893. — Mr. Casey Not printed. 

62. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 1st 

March, 1893, for copies of all communications, memorials, etc., addressed to his excellency in 
council, to the Dominion government or any member thereof, since 1888, urging the granting of a 
federal subsidy to the Central Ontario Railway Company, to enable that company to extend its 
line from Coehill northward. Presented 21st March, 1893. — Mr. Corby Not printed. 

63. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 1st 

March, 1893, for all correspondence, petitions and papers that are in the possession of the govern- 
ment relating to the disallowance of chapter 1 of the Acts of Nova Scotia, dated 1892 : "An act 
to amend and consolidate the Acts relating to Mines and Minerals," including any petition of 
David McKeen, Esq., M.P., and others, in respect of the said act. Presented 21st March, 1893. — 
Mr. Weldon Printed for sessional papers only. 

64. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th February, 1893, for a return, in the form 

used in the statements usually published in the Gazette, of the exports and imports from the first 
day of July, 1892, to the first day of January, 1893, distinguishing the products of Canada and 
those of other countries ; and comparative statements from the first day of July, 1891, to the first 
day of January, 1892. Presented 21st March,- 1893. — Sir R. Cartwright Not printed. 

65. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for all papers, documents, 

correspondence, etc., addressed to the government in relation to the best means to be adopted to 
prevent the spreading of cholera. Presented 23rd March, 1893. — Mr. Landerkin Not printed. 

66. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 15th March, 1893, for copies of all correspon- 

dence between the minister of justice and the Hon. J. G. Bosse, judge of the court of Queen's 
Bench, in relation to the trial and condemnation of R. H. McGreevy and O. E. Murphy, charged 
with a conspiracy to defraud ; of all recommendations and of all reports made by the said Hon. J. 
G. Bosse in relation to the conviction of the said Murphy and McGreevy and to a commutation 
of the sentence of R. H. McGreevy ; of the order for the commutation of the sentence of R. H. 
McGreevy, and of any petitions, letters, etc., in relation thereto. Presented 24th March, 1893. — 

Mr, Tarte , . . Not printed. 

13 



56 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1893 



VOLUME 11— Continued. 

67. Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 23rd February, 

1893, for: 1. A copy of the commission issued appointing and constituting certain persons a 
royal commission to obtain reliable data respecting the operation and effects of legislative prohi- 
bition of the traffic in intoxicating liquors. 2. Also a copy of any and all instructions given for 
the guidance of the said royal commission by or under the authority of the government. 3. Also 
copies of any and all documents and statistics furnished to the said royal commission, by any of 
the departments of the civil service, or any officer of the government, embodying information or 
suggestions in relation to the subjects which the said royal commission was appointed to examine 
and report upon. Presented 15th March, 1893. — Hon. Mr. Vidal : Not printed. 

68. Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 7th February, 1893, 

for copies of all letters, communications and telegrams between the minister of agriculture, or any 
official under him, or any other minister or official of the Dominion government, and the govern- 
ment of British Columbia or any official thereof, the British Columbia board of trade, and the 
local Dominion engineer, relating to the erection of a proper quarantine station at Albert Head 
or William Head, British Columbia. Presented 15th March, 1893. — Hon. Mr. Mclnnes (Victoria). 

Not printed. 

69. Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 7th March, 1893, 

for a copy of the royal instructions from her most gracious majesty the Queen to his excellency, 
on his appointment to his present office. Presented 20th March, 1893. — Hon. Mr. Wark. 

Printed for sessional papers only. 

70. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 0th February, 1893, for copies of all correspon- 

dence between Mr. Robertson, dairy commissioner for Canada, and the department of agi'icul- 
turo, in relation to a certain resolution adopted by a committee of the board of trade of Bristol, 
England, against accepting as Canadian chesse, cheese designated by the said committee under the 
name of "French Cheese" and manufactured in the province of Quebec. Copies of all speeches, 
letters and reports made by the said dairy commissioner, Mr. Robertson, on the value of cheese 
manufactured in the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. Presented 25th March, 1893. —Mr. Rinjret. 

Not printed. 

71. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 

20th February, 1893, for copy of the claims made by Messrs. F. B. McNamee & Co., con- 
tractors, in connection with the recommendations made by a select committee of the House of 
Coaimons, June, 1887, with all reports, orders in council and other papers relating thereto. 
Presented 28th March, 1893. — Sir Hector Langcvin : Not printed. 

72. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1893, for copies of all correspon- 

dence and reports accumulated between the years 1876 and 1893 in the hands of the government 
relating to the Lurcher Shoal, near the entrance to the Bay of Fundy, and proposed means for 
the protection of navigation in that vicinity. Presented 29th March, 1893. — Mr. Bowers. 

Not printed. 

73. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th March, 1893, for copies of all correspon- 

dence relating to the claim of Mr. Lauchlin McDougall, of Victoria County, Nova Scotia, for 
superannuation allowance, together with the amounts paid him as lighthouse-keeper in St. Paul's 
and Ingonish, giving the separate amounts for each year. Presented 29th March, 1893.— Mr. 
Fraser * Not printed. 

74. Return to an address of the House of Commons to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 13th 

March, 1893, for copies of all tenders, letters, telegrams and correspondence between the govern- 
ment and their agents and any other persons, in regard to the contract let for the repairing of the 
i )> .minion steamer " Quadra." Presented 30th March, 1893. — Mr. Prior Not printed. 

*.■>. General statements and returns of baptisms, marriages and ^burials in the districts of Chicoutimi, 
Gaspe, Joliette, Iberville, Montmagny, Ottawa and Saguenay, for the year 1892. Presented 30th 
March, 1893, by Hon. Mr. Speaker Not printed. 

7<». Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 14th March, 
1893, for a statement and account showing the amount said to have been improperly retained by 
William Ellis, superintendent of the Welland canal, and subsequently refunded by him, and not 
included in a return laid before the Senate, in answer to an address of the Senate of the 18th June, 

1891. Presented 28th March, 1893.— Hon. Mr. McCcdlwa Not printed. 

U 



66 Victoria. List of Sessional Papers. A 1893 



VOLUME 11— Concluded. 

77. Return to an address of the Senate to his excellency the Governor-General, dated 28th February, 1893, 
for a list giving the names of all persons employed permanently or temporarily at the custom-house 
at Montreal, on the first day of January, 1868 ; also a similar list of those 80 employed on the first of 
January, ultimo, with, in both cases, their ages, nationality, religion, salary, occupation an.l date 
of appointment. Presented 30th March, 1893. — Hon. Mr. Bellerose Not printed. 



15 



REPORT 



OP THE 



MINISTER OF JUSTICE 



AS TO 



PENITENTIARIES IN CANADA 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDED 30 th JUNE 



1892 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE QUEEN'S MOST 
EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1893 
[No. 18—1892.] Price, 15 cents. 



Department of Justice. 



To His Excellency the Governor-General of Canada, &c. } &c, &c. 



May it Please Your Excellency, 



For the information of Your Excellency, I have the honour to submit the 
accompanying Annual Eeport of the Inspector of Penitentiaries of the Dominion, 
also the Annual Reports of certain officers of the Penitentiaries, and the prescribed 
financial and statistical statements and tables, the same being for the year ended 



30th June, 1892. 



I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 



Department of Justice, 

Ottawa, December, 1892. 



JOHN S. D. THOMPSON, 

Minister of Justice. 



18— Al 



Department of Justice. 



INDEX. 



Inspector's General Report 

do report on Kingston Penitentiary 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary . 

Dorchester Penitentiary 

Manitoba Penitentiary 

British Columbia Penitentiary . . . 
Regina Jail 



do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 



Page. 



REPORTS, FINANCIAL RETURNS, STATISTICAL TABLES, &C. 

Kingston Penitentiary, report of Warden .' 1 

do per capita cost of convits . 3 

do report of Protestant Chaplain 4 

do do Roman Catholic Chaplain 4 

do do Surgeon 5 

do do Matron 12 

do do Schoolmaster 13 

do movements of convicts for past ten years 14 

do do 1891-92 15 

do returns of pardons 15 

do do deaths 16 

do do recommitments 16 

do do punishments 17 

do do remissions earned 17 

do do value of labour 18 

do do volumes in Library 18 

do do grist-mill account 19 

do do farm account 19 

do do revenue , 20 

.do do expenditure 21 

do balance sheet 26 

do officers employed 27 

do convicts received during 1891-92 31 

do criminal statistics 33 

do distribution of convicts. 36 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, report of Warden 37 

do per capita cost of convicts 39 

do report of Protestant Chaplain 40 

do do Roman Catholic Chaplain 41 

do do Surgeon 42 

do do Schoolmaster 44 

do return of convicts received during 1891-92 45 

do criminal statistics 47 

do movements of convicts from 1874 to 1892 49 

do do for 1891-92 50 

do return of pardons 50 

do do deaths 50 

do do recommitments 51 

do do punishments 51 

do • do remissions earned . . 52 

do do employments 52 

do do officers employed 53 



56 Victoria Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

Page. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, return of revenue 55 

do do expenditure 56 

do do cost of maintenance, less value of labour 61 

do balance sheet 62 

do days' work 62 

do farm account 63 

do value of buildings, land, &c 63 

Dorchester Penitentiary, Warden's Report 64 

do per capita cost of convicts 66 

do Pi otestant Chaplain's report 67 

do Roman Catholic Chaplain's report 68 

do Surgeon's report 69 

do Schoolmaster's report 71 

do convicts received in 1891-92 72 

do movements of convicts, 1891-92 74 

do comparative statement of movements of convicts, for twelve years 75 

do pardons 76 

do deaths 76 

do recommitments. 76 

do criminal statistics 77 

do punishments , 79 

do remissions earned 79 

do employments 80 

do value of labour '. 80 

do revenue 81 

do expenditure 82 

do balance sheet 86 

do officers employed 87 

do library 88 

Manitoba Penitentiary, Warden's report 89 

do per capita cost of convicts 91 

do Protestant Chaplain's report 92 

do Roman Catholic Chaplain's report 93 

do Surgeon's report 94 

do Schoolmaster's report 95 

do movements of convicts during 1891-92 95 

do convicts received, 1891-92 96 

do movements of convicts for last ten years 98 

do pardons , ' 99 

do recommitments 99 

do crimes 99 

do length of sentences 100 

do ethnology of convicts 100 

do nationality 100 

do ages 100 

do religion 101 

do education 101 

do occupation 101 

do civil condition 101 

do punishments 102 

do days remitted and lost 102 

<!<> value of unproductive labour 103 

do daily average of convicts 104 

<lo officers employed 104 

do revenue 105 

<1o expenditure 106 

do balance sheet 110 

do farni account 110 

do I i I >rary ' Ill 



Department of Justice. 



Page. 

British Columbia Penitentiary, Warden's report. L12 

do per capita coat of convicts LIS 

do Protestant Chaplain's report 1 1 I 

do Roman Catholic Chaplain's report 114 

do Surgeon's report 1 15 

do Schoolmaster's report lit; 

do convicts received during 1891-92 117 

do movements of convicts during 1891-92 118 

do do from 1882 to 1892 118 

do pardons 119 

do crimes for which imprisoned 119 

do sentences . . 120 

do ethnology of convicts 120 

do nationality 120 

do occupations 121 

do civil condition.. . • 121 

do moral habits 121 

do ages . 122 

do religion 122 

do education 122 

do punishments _ 123 

do remission earned 123 

do earnings of convicts 124 

do officers employed , 125 

do volumes in libraries 125 

do revenue . , 126 

do expenditure 127 

do balance sheet , '. 132 



Department of Justice. 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL EEPOET 

OF THE 

INSPECTOR OF PENITENTIARIES 

OF THE 

DOMINION OF CANADA 

FOE THE YEAE ENDED 30th JUNE, 1892. 



Honourable Sir John Thompson, 

Minister of Justice. 

Sir, — As the law directs, Act 49 Vic, cap. 182, sec. 16, I have the honour to lay 
before you my annual report, on the Penitentiaries of Canada, for the fiscal year 
ended 30th June, 1892. In obedieuce to rule, I submit, herewith, the reports of the 
several officers of the penitentiaries, whose duty it is to furnish such statements to 
the Inspector, and also the returns, statistics, &c, &c, called for by the rules and 
regulations approved by the Privy Council. 

The following summary shows the movements of convicts in the penitentiaries 
of the Dominion, during the last fiscal year : — 

Kingston Penitentiary. 

Males. Females. Total. 

Eemaining 30th June, 1891 562 24 586 

Eeceived since do 108 8 116 

670 32 702 
Discharged since 30th June, 1891 164 6 170 

Eemaining 30th June, 1892 506 26 532 

Nine male convicts died; two of the number were insane. Daily average 562^ 8 ^. 

Two escapes occurred. 

There were 54 convicts less on the 30th June last than on the same date in 189 1 # 

The number of the female prisoners increased from 24 to 26. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary. 

Males. Females. Total. 

Eemaining 30th June, 1891 350 350 

Eeceived since do 138 1 139 

488 1 489 

Discharged since 30th June, 1891 114 1 115 

Eemaining 30th June, 1892 374 374 

There was one death. No escape. The daily average was 353. 
An increase of 24 male convicts is shown. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (N T o. IS.) A. 1893 

Dorchester Penitentiary. 

. Males. Females. Total. 

Remaining 30th June, 1891 169 169 

Received since do , 72 4 76 

241 4 245 

Discharged since 30th June, 1891 69 4 73 

Remaining 30th June, 1892 172 172 

One death took place. One escape. Daily average 170. 
There has been an increase of 3 over the previous year. 

Manitoba Penitentiary. 

Males. Females. Total. 

Remaining 30th June, 1891 71 71 

Received since do 35 1 36 

106 1 107 

Discharged since 30th June, 1891 31 1 32 

Remaining 30th June, 1892 75 75 

No death occurred. Two escaped. Daily average 69*98. 
Increase 4. 

British Columbia Penitentiary. 

Males. Females. Total. 

Remaining 30th June, 1891 73 73 

Received since do . 19 1 20 

92 1 93 

Discharged since 30th June, 1891 17 1 18 

Remaining 30th June, 1892... 75 75 

Increase 2. Escaped 2. Daily average 73. No death. 

Recapitulation. 

Kingston Penitentiary 532 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary 374 

Dorchester do 172 

Manitoba do 75 

British Columbia do 75 

Total number of convicts 30th June, 1892 1,228 

do do do 1891 1,249 

Total decrease, 30th June, 1892 , 21 

In the several penitentiaries 387 convicts were received during the year ended 
30th June, 1892, as compared with 414 the previous year, a decrease of 27. The 
number discharged, last year was 408 and the year before 416, a decrease of 8 for the 
fiscal year 1891-92. 

vi 



Department of Justice. 

The prison population, in Kingston Penitentiary, at the close of the year 1891-92, 
shows a decrease of 54 contrasted with the total on 30th June, 1891, a very gratify- 
ing exhibit in the criminal statistics of the growing and populous province of Ontario. 
An increase of 24 in Quebec, 3 in the Maritime Provinces, 4 in Manitoba and li in 
British Columbia falls short of counterbalancing Ontario's decrease by 21. As 6 con- 
victs were transferred to Kingston, from other penitentiaries, in the course of the 
year, the actual decrease in the number of convicts from Ontario, in 1891-92 is 60. 

One might theorize upon this remarkable shortage — so to speak — in the criminal 
record of Ontario. Has an era of reformation set in? Is crime really lessening? 
Or, is a wider latitude as to its detection and punishment allowed, in Upper Canada, 
than in the sister provinces? Let us hope there is no ground for the last hypo- 
thesis; but that the large percentage of diminution in evil doing can be properly 
attributed to the social, moral and religious improvement of the people of Ontario. 

It is a rather startling fact at first sight that the number committed to St. 
Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, in 1891-92 exceeded that sent to Kingston by 29. 
This is altogether out of proportion to the population of the respective provinces. 
Doubtless, many are sentenced to the Central Prison, for the maximum term, who 
would be consigned to Kingston were the Toronto institution not in existence, and 
this may, in a measure, account for the disparity noticed. There is no similar prison 
in the province of Quebec, and this is to be regretted. 

Of late years, our penitentiaries have had a most undesirable, because a most 
hardened and irreclaimable class of criminals added to their numbers. This is parti- 
cularly the case at Kingston and St. Yincent de Paul, where those cockney sneak 
thieves and pickpockets, referred to, are numerous. These pests, gathered from the 
slums of St. Giles and East London, after short terms of so-called probation, in a 
certain notoriously mis-managed refuge, are periodically shipped out to Canada, as 
immigrants deserving of encouragement and support. With very few exceptions — as 
the police of our cities and towns know — these street Arabs from Whitechapel and 
Eotherhithoand Eatcliff and other like haunts of vice, speedily return to their old habits, 
on arriving in Canada, and, as a consequence, become a burden and an expense upon 
the tax-payers of the Dominion, in our reformatories, gaols and penitentiaries. Steeped 
as they have been in crime, from infancy, because inherited, they are found to be the 
most troublesome and worst conducted convicts that reach our penitentiaries. 
Their evil influence in corrupting others is potent and perniciouk The general 
verdict of the Chaplains and the other prison officers, .regarding those youthful 
imitators of Fagin and Bill Sykes, is most unfavourable. They consider them dead to 
all good influences and that their reformation is hopeless. In order to protect the 
community, against the depredations of such thoroughly trained malefactors, and 
our youth, especially, against the evil effects of their example and influence, it were 
advisable that effectual means be adopted to prevent mistaken philanthropists, 
abroad and at home, aiding and encouraging the transplanting to Canada of exotics 
so upas-like and so unsuited to the soil and moral atmosphere of the country. 

The use of tobacco by convicts, and the supplying of it to them at the public 
expense, has been sometimes commented upon in Parliament. One or two of the war- 
dens, even, object to the custom, now so long established. Tobacco is not allowed to 
minors, but there does not appear to be any well-grounded objection or valid reason 
for depriving adults, and especially those who have been accustomed to it, of so trifl- 

vii 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

ing a privilege. If smoking were allowed instead of chewing, it would be better on 
the score of cleanliness and, perhaps, of health. The following paragraph from the 
London Queen, of November 12th, may tend to allay the fears or the qualms with which 
some " unco guid " folk3 are troubled in reflecting upon the great evil, physically and 
morally, which tobacco entails upon those who come under the ban of the law and 
whose other luxuries and enjoyments are memories of the past or expectations in the 
future. The Queen says : — "The late Dr.W. F. Cumming, Kinellan,Murray Field, has, 
according to the British Medical Journal, bequeathed to the managers of the Edin. 
burgh Eoyal Infirmary the sum of £600 (payable on November 11) but only on the 
condition of their undertaking to invest the same, and apply the annual income 
thereof in the purchase of snuff and tobacco for the use of such poor patients, male 
and female, as may be admitted in the infirmary on account of chronic maladies and 
who have been addicted to the use of tobacco in any shape, and are known to be in 
distress from the want of it." Dr. Cumming would not, it is reasonable to presume, 
have devised the sum mentioned for tobacco and snuff, and the managers of the 
Edinburgh Eoyal Infirmary would not, surely, admit these articles inside the doors 
of that institution, were they productive of the injurious and demoralizing effects 
which prejudice or self-righteousness is wont to ascribe to their use. 1 1 has been asked, 
why not allow convicts whiskey as well as tobacco? Several reasons might be given 
to show that there is no parallel between rations of tobacco and rations of whiskey 
for convicts. In most if not in all the continental prisons of Europe the convicts are 
allowed to smoke, and they are enabled to buy, out of their own earnings, their 
tobacco and cigars and other little luxuries which are allowed under the prison rules. 
As these rules have been framed by men of the highest reputation and acknowledged 
experience in all that relates to the wise and proper administration of penal establish- 
ments and treatment of convicts, it may be claimed that this department is not fairly 
censurable for having adopted the same indulgent and encouraging practice of dis- 
tributing a weekly allowance of tobacco to each adult convict in our penitentiaries. 

The plain, home truths set forth, in lastyear's report, regarding the disciplinary 
officers of the several penitentiaries, have, I am happy to say, produced good results. 
There has been a general awakening among the careless and lethargic and those who 
had been giving satisfaction before, have, since, shown themselves more zealous and 
efficient. A number of the officers, of one of the penitentiaries, inconsiderately took 
to themselves the remarks intended for the whole service, felt much aggrieved and 
expressed themselves accordingly. Upon sober after-thought they discovered and 
acknowledged their error.- The general consensus of opinion, particularly among 
the wardens and other superior officers is, that the strictures were deserved and were 
most opportune. 

In this portion of the report I have no suggestion or recommendation to make 
outside those submitted for your consideration in the report of last year. Of these 
you were pleased to signify your approval, and your intention to carry them out as 
the means and opportunity would allow. The leading journals of the Dominion, in 
noticing the report referred to, mentioned favourably and with commendation the 
principal reforms and improvements that were recommended. In view of Parlia- 
ment being asked to take action upon any measures you may deem it expedient to 
introduce, based upon the amendments proposed, it may not be out of place to sum- 
marize them, here. They are as follows: — 

viii 



Department of .lust ice. 



1. The multiplying of light industries for the purposes of revenue and the extend- 
ing of trades and skilled labour among the convicts. 

2. The appointment of* one duly qualified or of a commission to visit certain 
countries in Europe, in order to acquire the information and particular details neces- 
sary for the successful operation of the Prison of Isolation, at Kingston. 

3. The establishment of a reformatory prison for young men between the ages 
of 16 and 30. 

4. A higher standard of qualification for the police of the penitentiaries, that is 
to say, the guards and keepers, and a higher grade of salaries. 

5. The adoption of the indeterminate sentence system. 

6. A life sentence after third conviction for serious crimes. 

7. The participation of the convict in his earnings over and above what covers 
his maintenance. 

8. A trial of the ticket of leave plan with all possible safeguards. 

9. An increase to the small stipend granted to the eight organists in the four 
penitentiaries, viz. : St. Vincent de Paul. Dorchester, Manitoba and British Columbia, 
who, now, receive $50 each a year, for training and practising the choirs, in addition 
to their attendance on Sundays and holidays. It was also proposed to allow to th e 
two convict organists, in Kingston Penitentiary, the sum of $10 each, a year, to be 
deposited in the Post Office Savings Bank until the discharge of the one and the 
other. The Chaplains are unanimous — without any preconcerted agreement — in 
recommending an increase to the organists. Hon. Messrs. Bowell and Chapleau? 
when at Dorchester, a short time ago, very considerately pleaded with you for a 
more liberal allowance. It is not too much to say that $100, per annum, is well 
earned by the respective organists. 

The report for the year ended 30th June, 1890, contains the following para- 
graph :— 

" Being convinced that beneficial results would follow from the daily inter- 
course and ministrations of the Chaplains, among the convicts, permit me to renew 
my recommendation that provision be made as to salary and quarters — where the 
latter may be needed — to this end." As you felt disposed to take the same view of 
this important matter it may not be inopportune, now, to place it before you for 
further consideration, the benefit to be derived by the convicts from closer and 
more frequent association with their spiritual advisers, as experienced in the penal 
prisons of Great Britain and Ireland. 

The report and punishment books show that in some of the penitentiaries con- 
victs have been kept in the dungeon one and two months and even for a longer 
period. I have discouraged this practice in my minutes. No doubt, such punish- 
ment or, rather, its equivalent is, as a rule, deserved. But, in view of the convict's 
labour being lost to the penitentiary, for so long a time, some mode of punishment 
other than the dungeon, after a short trial of that, should be adopted. If a week in 
the dungeon do not produce the desired effect, longer confinement there generally 
results in a greater degree of callousness, stubbornness and resistance to authority. 
There are many convicts who would prefer idleness and the dungeon to daily rou- 
tine prison life and work. Instead of the dungeon, low diet, deprivation of tobacco, 

ix 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

remission time and of the privilege of writing or receiving letter or visits of friends 
and such like, could be substituted and I recommend that this be done. Extreme 
cases may arise when the dungeon like the triangle would prove efficacious. A 
great deal must be left to the discretion of the wardens; but, a too liberal use of 
the dungeons is to be deprecated. 

Kingston Penitentiary. 
In his report, the warden states that, " the discipline, has been well maintained, 
and the conduct of the prisoners has in a marked manner improved." The dark 
cell and loss of remission time are the two principal modes of punishment by which 
the discipline and conduct and industry of the convicts can be compared, year by 
year. For the year ended 30th June, 1891, the summary of punishments awarded 
shows that 201 were sent to the dark cells and 194 lost remission time. During the 
year 1891-92, only 123 were sentenced to the dark cells «nd 120 forfeited short time. 
These results bear out the warden's statement. 

A full and searching inquiry into alleged irregularities and wrong-doing, on 
the part of certain officers, was made under your instructions. Every member of the 
staff was examined upon oath. The evidence is now before you for consideration. 

The Prison of Isolation is not yet finished. It may not be ready for occupation 
until early next autumn, as there is a considerable amount of work yet to be done, 
such as the supplying of each cell with electric light and water-closet, as also neces- 
sary furniture. The industries recommended are mat and broom-making, cane and 
wicker work. I have prepared a code of rules which awaits the action of the Privy 
Council, if approved by you. There being no similar institution on this continent, 
for one's guidance and no opportunity having been afforded of obtaining the informa- 
tion and experience necessary, from sources whence they could be procured — as 
recommended in former report — there is reason to apprehend that the successful 
inauguration and operation of the Prison of Isolation will be attended with much 
difficulty and trouble. If proof were needed to show the great importance of opening 
and conducting this Prison of Isolation upon the best and most approved plan and 
principles, it were only necessary to advert to the large number of young men, 58 
per cent under 30 and 11 per cent under 20 years of age, in this penitentiary alone, 
to be affected by the result of the experiment. 

The water tower will be roofed in time to have the tank constructed before 
next summer. The Worthington pump, now in use at the penitentiary, has, it may 
be presumed, sufficient power and capacity to send the water to the tower, in that 
it supplied the exhibition grounds, a good half mile further, with abundance of water- 
Should it prove inadequate, the " Annex" to the pump and boiler room, asked for 
and approved by you, can be built. 

The mill has been dismantled and the warden has received instructions to dis- 
pose of the machinery to the best abvantage. The space occupied by the mill will 
be converted into a bakery, for which it is very well adapted. 

The impression is strong upon the minds of the citizens of Kingston that, the 
water of the bay is vitiated by sewage of the penitentiary. To remove this as well 
as to guard against the p rison supply being polluted by the discharge from the main 
sewer, I, again, beg to recommend that a large tank or reservoir be made on the 
esplanade to receive the drainage, &c, which can be pumped out for manuring 
purposes. 

x 



Department of Justice. 

The laundry and baths, in the old annealing room, are nearly finished. This is a 
more suitable place and in close connection with the dry room. The baths are similar 
to those at St. Vincent de Paul, which have given so much satisfaction. 

The only work done for the Departments is in connection with the Indian 
Branch. It is to be regretted, in the interest of the penitentiary and of its inmates, 
that a larger share of remunerative employment cannot be given by the Government. 

Plans are being prepared for a new female prison and a criminal insane asylum, 
for which votes were taken last session. Sites for these buildings can be had on the 
penitentiary land — the former in the field east of the prison, and the latter north 
of the warden's house, where a large portion of the protecting wall has been already 
built. In consequence of the numerous works on hand and projected, it was stated 
in last year's report, that it might be necessary to have the asylum built by contract. 
The warden and Superintendent of works having consulted on the matter, undertook 
to say that the asylum, the female prison and the officers' quarters could be put up 
by convict labour. This may be done in the course of many years; but they cannot 
be built, within any reasonable time, unless by contract. It could be ascertained 
what the cost would be either way, the plans and specifications being prepared. 
The greater portion if not all the stone, the lime and the iron-work could be supplied 
by the penitentiary in connection with a contract. This would greatly reduce the 
expense. Beside the buildings, just mentioned, other important and necessary works 
are either in progress or about to be undertaken, Among these are the finishing of 
the water tower, the building of a library and officers' mess room, over the kitchen, 
the levelling and grading of the site for the officers' quarters and the taking down 
and rebuilding of the prison wings, in view of enlarging the cells. The convict 
labour available is not adequate to meet all those demands upon it, and hence the 
necessity, for the first time, in the history of the penitentiary, of having works done 
by outside hands. 

The female prison continues to be conducted efficiently and satisfactorily. The 
women are employed, constantly, in various ways. The matron gives a favourable 
account of their conduct. There are two of the number crazy and one'of them gives 
very much trouble, especially at night when she disturbs the others by her shouts 
and loud talk. There is no proper place for female lunatics and there is no other 
alternative than to pardon them in order that they be sent to an asylum, or retain 
them, to the great annoyance of the other prisoners, not to speak of the trouble 
and inconvenience caused to the matron and her assistant. Both these women were 
of unsound mind when received into the prison. 

The Protestant chaplain observes that the school monitors work better than he 
had anticipated, and that the two libraries have been amalgamated, the religious 
works being kept separately in the respective chapels. 

The Catholic chaplain speaks in terms of high commendation of the conduct of 
the prisoners under his care. He says they give no unnecessary trouble, that they 
are respectful, in and out of chapel, constant in their attention to instructions, desir- 
ous to become acquainted with the truths of religion and edifying in the becoming 
and reverential manner in which they assist at the divine services. All this he 
attributes, largely, to the good effect produced by the mission of the Oblate Fathers 
last spring. The chaplain adds : — " The amalgamation of the libraries has admirably 
succeeded in its purpose, as far as my department is concerned." 

xi 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

The surgeon reports that " this prison was never in a more favourable position, 
as regards its hygienic condition than at present." There has been no epidemic, 
although several cases of typhoid were treated from which three deaths resulted. 
" La grippe" also made another visitation. The surgeon remarks, with truth, that 
" none are better looked after than the inmates of this institution. Their food is 
wholesome and sufficient, their clothing warm and comfortable in winter, cool in 
summer, their work not more laborious than labouring men outside are accustomed 
to, their hours both for retiring and rising early; the dormitory and workshops well 
ventilated ; they have works with which to occupy their minds when in their cells, 
and were it not for the smallness of those cells, more comforts at night are enjoyed 
by them than the majority of men of their class have outside those walls." This is 
equally true of the other penitentiaries. Two of the convicts who died were over 80 
years of age. In the insane ward 2*7 are under treatment. The surgeon states that the 
majority of those are mentally incurable. Dr. Strange refers to the two insane female 
convicts already mentioned. He says : — " This causes a great deal of trouble to the 
matron and deputy matron and renders it almost impossible to prevent the sane 
female prisoners from repeatedly violating the rules of the institution." Several 
accidents — some rather serious — occurred during the year, the details of which are 
given in the surgeon's return. 

The schoolmaster describes the conduct of the men attending school and their 
progress to have been " very satisfactory." The daily average was 90 out of 98 on 
the roll. 

The number of volumes in the library at the end of the year was 3,051 ; the 
number of volumes issued, to 371 prisoners using the library, was 12,513. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary. 

The conduct of the prisoners, according to the warden's report and to what 
transpired during the visits of inspection, has been " generally good." 

There were 35 recommitments last year compared with 26 the previous year. 
The warden thinks " it is time to provide for the punishment of this class of habitual 
offenders." If some means of identifying them, as repeaters, before trial, could be 
adopted, the judges trying them would be in a position to pronounce sentences accord- 
ing to their deserts. Some years ago, in the annual report, I recommended that a 
reliable penitentiary officer, of long service and experience, should be appointed from 
Kingston and St. Yincent de Paul, to visit the gaols of Ontario and Quebec, within a 
short time of the courts of Assize and the Queen's Bench being held, for the purpose 
of identifying such prisoners, awaiting trial, as had served one or more terms as con- 
victs and to give testimony to that effect. Something like this could be done ; for, 
as a rule, the police do not trouble themselves to make known to the judges that 
such and such prisoners were tried and convicted, although well aware of the fact, 
and thus they escape the full penalty which a repetition of crime should entail. 

The boundary wall has progressed steadily. The style of architecture — Tuscan 
— adopted by Mr. Bowes, is most suitable, being massive, very pleasing to the eye 
and quite in keeping with the splendid and substantial buildings which he designed 
and erected, inside the wall. That it should be deemed necessary to make any 
departure from Mr. Bowes's plan, is, in my opinion, a matter for regret. It is only 
within a few days I have learned that alterations have been made in the stairs of the 

xii 



Department of Justice. 

towers, and in the plan of construction of the north gate. Wooden steps have 
been substituted for stone in the towers, quite at variance with the tout ensemble of 
the structure. Considering how easily an evil-disposed person could set fire to those 
stairs and burn them down, or how soon they will wear out, compared with stone, 
there can be no economy in the change that has been made. There is abundance 
of stone out of which to hew the steps, abundance of labour and ample time to do 
the hewing, cui bono, therefore, the spoiling of those fine towers ? The plan of the 
wall and the gates having been submitted to you and having received your appro- 
val, any deviation therefrom should not, I assume, have been attempted without 
your knowledge and consent. So far as I am aware, you have not been consulted. 
If this be the case, I strongly recommend that the original plans, both as regards 
the towers and gates, be followed. » 

Several improvements, which are enumerated in the warden's report, have been 
made. The opening of the new shop for carriage making, upholstering, painting, &c, 
to which he refers, is of advantage to the convicts in the way of having trades and 
profitable to the institution, on the score of revenue. 

That no escape occurred among the hundred and odd convicts who worked out- 
side the wall, affords proof of proper activity and vigilance on the part of the keepers 
and guards in charge of the outside gangs. 

With regard to the tinning of the barn and the Government tenements, men- 
tioned by the warden, it will be well to submit for approval, an item in the estimates 
to cover the necessary expenditure. 

The warden passes the following encomium upon his staff: — " I am pleased to 
say that the officers, as a whole, have been painstaking in the discharge of their 
various duties, and are ever ready to assist me in maintaining the discipline of the 
prison." 

The granolithic floors for the central hall, corridors, &c, for which part provi- 
sion was made in the last estimates, have not been yet laid, but, no doubt, before the 
end of the fiscal year, this will be done. 

The Catholic chaplain, on 30th June last, had 288 convicts on his register. 
During religious service, he testifies, ■"' attention and good behaviour are maintained." 
The singing is " remarkably good," and the chaplain says : " Our organist is most 
certainly deserving of the increase of salary you mentioned in your last annual 
report." He refers to the fruit of the .good example given by the officers and even 
by the prisoners, as shown in the large number who frequent the sacraments and 
the " notable progress in the discharge of religious duties." On the other hand, he 
points out the evil effect of bad example which " has caused the fall of most of our 
convicts." 

There were 86 convicts attending the Protestant chapel on 30th June. This is 
the largest number yet recorded, and rather crowds the chapel. In the event of the 
number increasing beyond the capacity of the chapel, better accommodation, as to 
space, can be provided in another part of the building. The chaplain does not desire 
to change, if it can be avoided. Should it become necessary, he will take advantage 
of the offer made to him of providing room elsewhere. Upon the completion of the 
boundary wall a suitable chapel will be built. In speaking of the conduct of the 
prisoners in the chapel, the chaplain says, — " Nothing could be more orderly." He 

xiii 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

expresses himself pleased with the new pipe organ, " which is a good substantial 
instrument, and will be of material service in leading and sustaining the voices in 
the service." 

The surgeon represents the hygienic state of the penitentiary as very good. 
There was no epidemic or contagious disease during the year, and at its close only 
two patients were under treatment in hospital. This prison, since it was opened, 
has been remarkably free from typhoid and other diseases of endemic character. 

The school has been well and competently conducted, and the results very grati- 
fying. The chaplains continue to bear testimony to the zeal and attention of the 
teacher. The men who attend conduct themselves becomingly and evince a strong 
desire to make good use of the opportunity afforded to improve themselves. " By 
diligent study, both in the school and in their cells," the teacher says, " they 
endeavour to procure the advantage of education." 

The two libraries — Catholic and Protestant — have been much improved by the 
addition of the books purchased from the parliamentary grant, as well as from the 
special allotment which you were pleased to make from the gate fund, established 
for this and other like purposes beneficial to the convicts. Referring to the library, 
the Catholic chaplain says, — " The special grant of money has enabled me to buy 
sufficient books to accommodate abundantly all our readers." The Protestant chap- 
lain remarks, — " Out of the money appropriated I have been enabled to make a 
valuable addition of books of an educational character; books of reference, also 
biographical, historical and fiction, selected with the greatest care, in all amounting 
to 281 volumes, which is much appreciated." No money can be better spent in con- 
nection with our penitentiaries, than in keeping up the libraries. Owing to the two 
languages — French and English — being used here, it has not been found practical or 
desirable to amalgamate the libraries. 

I quote the following from my minutes of inspection made during the year : — 

" I have to express satisfaction at the manner in wnich I found the affairs of 
this penitentiary conducted, as shown during my inspection. The discipline is well 
maintained, and the conduct and industry of the prisoners, on the whole, very good, 
indeed. No complaint has been made to me by the warden against any officer, and 
no officer or convict has come before me with a grievance." — Minute Book, p. 532. 

Again, — "It is but true to say the discipline was very much at a discount, from 
the opening of the penitentiary, in 1873, until the appointment of the present warden. 
His success in maintaining it is due to the fact that he follows the rules and obeys 
the instructions he receives." — Ibid., p. 569. 

The judgment, tact and influence exercised by the first chaplain, Father Leclerc, 
among the convicts, for many years prevented a general gaol delivery, more than 
once, without any sanction of law. 

Dorchester Penitentiary. 
On pago 623 of the Minute Book is the following entry : — " I am highly gratified 
at being in a position to express my satisfaction at the general state of affairs here, 
and to endorse the administration of the warden. My minutes of inspection show 
there is no room for fault-finding or censure." Your own minute, in the same book, 
in to the like effect. You wrote : — " Having visited the prison in company with Hon, 
Mr. Bowell, Minister of Militia; Hon. Mr. Chapleau, Minister of Customs, and 

xiv 



Department of Justice. 

Messrs. Stewart and Venning, we made an examination of the building and premises, 
during an hour and a half, and were pleased to observe the order, perfect cleanliness, 
silence and discipline of the institution, for which the warden and staff deserve the 
commendation which it has given me pleasure to bestow on them elsewhere." 

(Signed) Jno. S. D. Thompson, 

Minister of Justice. 

The conduct and industry of the prisoners — a very few excepted — have given 
satisfaction. 

The officers havo been faithful and attentive in the discharge of their respective 
duties. The warden had no complaint of consequence to make against any member 
of the staff. Of the chaplains he says : — " I have very much pleasure in reporting 
that the services of the chaplains have been most satisfactory, and I know that they 
are doing good work." This is quite true. 

The marsh lands, which had been much exhausted, were flooded last autumn 
and remained covered until June. A considerable deposit of mud was left, from the 
fertilizing properties of which the warden expects favourable results in the way of 
good meadows and pasture. 

The supply of spruce, from the penitentiary land having become exhausted, it 
was necessary to buy what was required for the manufacture of tubs, &c. 

The enlargement and other improvements in the tailor and shoe shops, referred 
to in last report, have been made, thereby adding much to the convenience and com- 
fort of the instructors and prisoners. 

A new cement floor has been laid down in the laundry, which is now in good 
repair, and so separated from the adjoining shops as to prevent the unsavoury odours 
and steam of the suds penetrating there any more. 

The supply of fuel from the penitentiary land will be exhausted this winter. 
A great saving in the cost of coal has been accomplished for some years by the 
thousands of cords of wood which the fallen and dozed trees of the bush furnished. 

Some apprehension" has been felt about the water supply. On one or two occa- 
sions the depth of water in the reservoirs decreased so much as to cause well 
grounded alarm. It was found expedient to stop the supply to the officers' quarters 
from the reservoirs, and to furnish them with what they required from the spring 
near the farm-yard. In order to economize the water from the main source of supply 
to the prison, it would be well to connect the quarry spring with the officers' houses 
by means of a 3" pipe. The warden has been instructed to measure the distance in 
view of ascertaining the number of feet of pipe required and to report the result. 
In view of protecting the source of the water supply on the height of land, it 
would be advisable to acquire the surrounding property. Negotiations were entered 
upon for this end, but with no satisfactory result. The cutting down of the timber 
around the little springs and rills from which the reservoirs are fed will tend materi- 
ally to lessen the quantity of water, the shade being removed. Indeed, 1 have 
learned that the owner of the land has been felling the large trees since the negotia- 
tions were broken off. This is a matter that requires consideration, and that, too, 
without much loss of time. To lose or have impaired the supply of such excellent 
water would be nothing short of a calamity. Every precaution, therefore, should be 

xv 



56 Victoria Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

taken to guard against such a contingency. The warden, consequently, has been 
instructed to bring this matter before the Department in view of purchasing the 
Turner property and of protecting the water source. 

The warden has reported that the Eddy Company are not carrying out their 
agreement to take, annually, at least 1,500 dozens of pails. Their order was short 
that number, when the warden wrote. He has notified the company, more than 
once, of their short-coming but with no satisfactory result. I recommend that, 
unless the number of pails stipulated for be taken, that the arrangement be closed- 
The warden is of opinion that he can make better terms, elsewhere, for the sale of 
the woodenware. 

The goods furnished by the Oxford Manufacturing Company give special satis- 
faction; the colour of the cloth for officers' uniform is greatly improved. It may be 
stated, here, that these goods have been equally approved of in the other peniten- 
tiaries. The contracts for the other supplies are properly executed. 

The officers' quarters are comfortable and in good repair. The addition of the 
working kitchen and shed, for fuel, to those houses where it has been made, is a use- 
ful and valuable one. 

The chapel does not require any particular mention beyond the fact that, the 
new organ is not giving satisfaction. The warden has been instructed' to ask the 
builder either to put the instrument in proper order, exchange it for another and a 
better one or reiund the money paid for it. 

As some of the convicts have complained of the bread — without reason, I 
believe — and as the convict temporarily in charge of the bakery haa not been giving 
entire satisfaction, I recommend that a regular baker instructor be again employed. 

The Protestant chaplain makes favourable mention of the attention of 
the prisoners, during divine service; " a breach of decorum is entirely 
unknown." He is not quite satisfied with the musical part of the service, owing to 
the constant changes in the choir by the outgoing of trained and incoming of 
untrained members. In his reference to the general library he says, — " it is as 
satisfactory to my brother chaplain as to myself; and that, under Mr. Gray's manage- 
ment, it is in better and smoother working condition than it has ever been." This 
is a pleasing result of the fusion of the two libraries. There are 126 Protestant 
convicts in Rev. Mr. Campbell's charge, and he is most zealous and attentive in look- 
ing after their spiritual interests. 

The report of the Catholic chaplain will repay perusal. It shows the deep con- 
cern he takes in his work and in the welfare of the men under his charge. The 
figures which he gives show what a large number of the convicts are wholly 
ignorant and without religious instruction. " The longer I remain in this field of 
labour " he says, " the fonder I feel of my work and of the men under my charge." 
And this is the secret of Father Cormier's success. The convicts know he has their 
well-being, here and hereafter, deeply at heart, and, consequently his advice and 
teaching bear more than ordinary fruit. The behaviour of the prisoners, wherever 
he meets them, in or out of the chapel, he describes as " most commendable." The 
organist and singers are indefatigable, by means of practice and rehearsals, to keep 
up the efficiency of the choir. The chaplain expresses his acknowledgments for 
my humble — but as yet unsuccessful — pleading to obtain an increase of salary for 

xvi 



Department of Justice. 

the different organists. In the midst of so many and absorbing cares it is not sur- 
prising that a trifling matter, comparatively, of this nature, should escape the 
memory or attention of a minister. Lot us hope that a responsive chord will be 
touched in the hearts of the members of the treasury board, and that the estimates 
to be submitted at the approaching session of Parliament will show their apprecia- 
tion of sacred music, in our penitentiary chapels, and of the untiring efforts made by 
the eight lady organists — men cannot bo had for the pittance they get — to render 
the religious services, on Sundays and holidays, joyful, and cheering and soul-inspir- 
ing for the convict. 

The surgeon claims for the institution the same good condition, as regards 
health, that has always obtained since its opening. He notices the admission of 9 
lads of 16 and under, and of 2 diminutive Mic-Mac Indians aged, respectively, 10 and 
11 years. 

The school has been well attended and conducted ; the average attendance dur- 
ing the year, was 52*9. In my visits I observed that the prisoners were diligent in 
learning an i attentive to the instructions they received. The following is what the 
Protestant chaplain says of the school in his report : — 4i The discipline is perfect ; the 
pupils show much genuine interest in their work, and a real desire to learn, from 
which, to some extent, may fairly be inferred, some desire to reform." The school- 
master in his report, says, — " Very considerable progress has been made by the large 
majority of those attending, iand it is most encouraging to find so many who, on first 
coming, knew nothing more than the alphabet, able, after a few months' attendance, 
to read, write and figure with a good deal of proficiency." Want of education and of 
all wholesome training, in youth, cause many to commit crime. For such the school 
is a priceless boon, a great factor in leading to their reformation. 

Manitoba Penitentiary. 

Mr. Geo. L. Foster, accountant of penitentiaries, continued in charge of this in- 
stitution, as warden pro tern., the past year. Not having paid a visit to Stony Moun- 
tain, during that period, I cannot speak from personal knowledge of its affairs. From 
the reports before me it may be reasonably concluded that the administration was 
carried on very successlully. 

The warden pro t an. enumerates the improvements made for the greater security 
of the prison, which was required and will, no doubt, tend to prevent escapes. He 
considers the prison wall will complete the necessary protection. A wall to inclose 
an area of two acres, including the prison proper and the buildings, immediately in 
proximity, may be put up, in the course of six or seven years, by convict labour, 
when masonry is mastered to some extent. To build a wall surrounding twelve or 
fourteen acres, as at other penitentiaries, twenty-five feet high and thick in propor- 
tion, would give emploj^ment to all the convicts who could be set to work on it in 
quarrying stone, dressing it, burning lime, mixing mortar and at mason work, for 
twenty years at least. If the work be done by contract even the lesser wall — i.e. 
round the two acres — will be a formidable and very expensive work. To increase 
the staff of guards, so as to man four substantially built wooden look-out stands judici- 
ously placed, and have a couple of mounted patrols on duty, while the convicts are 
at work, should defeat any attempts at escape which is the main object of the pro- 
posed wall. The present staff of twelve guards should supply the four men required 
for the stands, [t would be only necessary, then to employ two more for mounted 

xvii 
18— B 



56 Victoria Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

duty. This plan would be nearly, if not quite, as efficacious for the purpose as a 
wall — provided the right stamp of men be employed — and it would be more econo- 
mical, until such time {is the prison resources would be equal to the undertaking. 
Should a wall that would barely encompass the buildings be erected, time and money 
would be saved, but the many advantages of a spacious prison yard, which only ex- 
perienced prison officials can duly appreciate, would be lost. Before anything be 
done in the direction of building a wall, no matter of what extent, I recommend, 
first, that it be ascertained whether the work can be done by convict labour ; if not, 
secondly, what would be the approximate cost, by contract, of building a wall to 
inclose, nay, twelve or two acres or the buildings alone. In connection with this 
project, it may not be out of place to say that, most if not all of the escapes which 
have been made, from this penitentiary, were due not so much to the want of a wall 
as to some weak or insecure point in the prison, or to neglect or want of proper 
vigilance by the officer in charge of the convicts who ran away. I recommend that 
nothing be done regarding the wall, until such information as I have indicated be 
obtained. 

The use to which the dry sbed, or rink will be converted — a hay mow in the 
farm yard and a coal shed near the railway station — upon my recommendation of 
the suggestion of the warden, pro tem, is as good a disposal of that useless structure 
as could be made. 

The farm, according to the showing of the warden, pro tern, has been very much 
extended as to the area under cultivation. When he took charge only 45 acres were 
tilled. His report states that 89 acres yielded crops in 1891-92 and that 123 acres 
will be ready for next year's operations. 

The idea of the warden pro tern of feeding about 100 hogs, on the produce of the 
farm, for prison use, is a good one, and will, doubtless effect the saving which he 
points out. He expected to butcher five tons of pork this last autumn. 

Upon the report of the warden pro tern and my recommendation you authorized 
the wire fencing of the penitentiary land, except a small opening near Stony 
Mountain Village. 

I fully concur with the Warden pro tern in his recommendation not to allow the 
roadway through the Reserve, asked for by the Municipality of Eockwood, at the 
expense of*' 12 acres of our best farm land." Mr. Foster's explanation, coupled with 
my own knowledge of the locality and its wants lead me to recommend that the 
right of way, which would entail serious disadvantages and inconvenience be not 
allowed without a further report on the matter. 

The Warden, pro tern, took salutary precautions with regard to the drainage, the 
cesspool and the very objectionable surroundings of the slaughter house. These 
were well calculated to breed disease of a dangerous nature. 

"The removal of the insane at an early date, will be a step in the right direc- 
tion," Mr. Foster says, I agree with him. These afflicted people cannot be treated, 
as their condition requires, in close connection with convicts and penal surroundings. 
Even convict lunatics, should, if possible, be relieved from all association with their 
former companions in crime. 

I beg leave to suggest that some improvement be made in the Warden's 
residence. To keep it up, properly, would require a much larger salary than is 

xviii 



Department of Justice. 

allowed. The removing of a storey, if it can be done, would, I think, be an im- 
provement. The house is in an exposed situation, and the beating of it is very- 
expensive.. Apart from this important item, the salary of the Warden is not suffi- 
cient to meet the expense of its proper equipment. I recommend that such altera- 
tions be made as will enable the Warden to occupy the house without causing too 
great a strain on his pecuniary resources. Referring to my minutes I find thai the 
Warden pro tern informed me that this house is unsafe. If this prove true it may be 
necessary to take it down when it could be rebuilt on a better and more economic 
plan. 

The Protestant Chaplain states that the conduct of his convicts " has been all 
that could be desired," with one exception. This is a negro who is grossly ignorant, 
obstinate and very bad tempered. Being a powerful fellow, it is dangerous to trust 
him among the other convicts and guards, as he is as treacherous as he is violent. 
It may be advisable to transfer him to Kingston where he could be placed under 
restraint as a lunatic, if necessary. The school and library, the Chaplain says, " con- 
tinue to do most useful work." 

I have to dissent from the chaplain's suggestion as to the mode of ascertaining 
the religious persuasion of convicts by " the Judge or Sheriff." This should be done 
by the proper officer, at the penitentiary, upon admission. Should any doubt or 
dispute arise concerning the religion of a convict the matter can be investigated by 
the warden, in presence of both chaplains, and reported upon, if necessary, for 
the information and decision of the Minister. It seems strange to have any difficulty 
or misunderstanding occur on this point, since every convict has full liberty to make 
choice of the chapel, where he intends to worship, upon entering the prison, and 
such choice ought, under the Eules, be final and preclude all interference on the 
part of any officer. There is no trouble, on this score, at any other penitentiary. 

The Catholic Chaplain, at the end of the year, had 25 convicts under his charge. 
He says, — " In a general way those I had have given me satisfaction." 

The Surgeon has no cases of severe illness, no accidents of a serious nature, and 
no deaths to report. He has nothing specially important to mention. 

Colonel Irvine has been appointed Warden vice Mr. S. L. Bedson, deceased. Mr. 
D. D. Bourke, late Schoolmaster and Hospital Overseer, has succeeded Mr. M. D. O. 
McDonell as Deputy Warden. 

British Columbia Penitentiary. 

The conduct of the prisoners is reported, by the warden, to have been good 
and to have given satisfaction, one convict excepted. This man is thoroughly 
depraved and wicked, and hails from the States. It is wrong that such hardened 
and unscrupulous villains, as he is, should be let loose upon society at the expiration 
of a comparatively short sentence. For these characters the Prison of Isolation, 
coupled with the indeterminate sentence system, would be just the remedy. 

The Warden calls attention to the defective character of the water supply. 
Pursuant to my report, you have seen fit to authorize the negotiation of a contract 
with the Water Works Commissioners, of New Westminster, to furnish the peniten- 
tiary. The terms are favourable and include fire service, water for the farm-yard, 
garden and the officers' quarters. Tenders for the pipe and plumbing have been 
called for and* the award of the contract has been made. The water is pronounced 

xix 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

to be of superior quality, from the Coquitlam lake, and will be abundant and unfail- 
ing as long as required. 

The Corporation of New Westminster made application for fifteen feet of ground, 
in front of the Warden's residence, for the purpose of widening the public road 
running from the City to Sappert'on and Port Moody. This has been allowed on con- 
dition that the grade of the road be raised and a retaining wall built from the 
wooden bridge over the creek, running out of the ravine, to the entrance gate to the 
Warden's grounds. A similar wall is to be built, by the Corporation, at the foot of 
the embankment upon which the officers' quarters stand. If this work be properly 
and substantially done the G-overnment property will be greatly improved. 

A new wharf, for the use of the prison, has been constructed, It is strongly 
and solidly built. A shed upon it will be necessaty for coal, lumber, &c, and can be 
put up by convict labour. 

The small wharf and shed, directly opposite the entrance to the penitentiary, 
have not been removed. It is objectionable to have these structures so near to 
places where the convicts work, and to have small boats moored to them. By the 
aid of confederates and these boats escapes could be easily effected. The Warden has 
been instructed to carry out the provisions of the Act by clearing away the tres- 
passers from all parts of the penitentiary reserve. 

It is proposed to heat the prison with hot water, and an appropriation of $5,875 
was made for that purpose, last Session. Tenders have been invited and the work 
will be done at considerably less cost than was estimated. 

The guards' quarters are in good repair, but baths are much needed. These can 
be put in at comparatively small expense. I recommend that they be allowed. 

The crops have been very good. The land is skilfully handled as regards 
manuring, draining, rotation of crops and thorough cultivation. This is shown by 
the fact that there is no expenditure for potatoes or other vegetables or forage 
incurred here. 

The trades carried on are tailoring, shoemaking, carpentry, blacksmithing and 
baking, which give employment to about 30 convicts. The other prisoners are 
engaged upon the necessary domestic work of the prison, and at outside labour such 
as farming, clearing the land, gardening and general improvements on the reserve. 

Several Indians and Chinamen work in the tailor shop and become \evy good 
tradesmen. The work done in the shoe shop is of superior quality, the Instructor 
taking great pains with his men. The output is greater than is required for the use 
of the prison. I recommend that authority be given to dispose of the surplus to out- 
side customers, at trade prices. This is so comparatively limited that it cannot 
affect the regular dealers. Even at the risk of doing this, I consider it necessary to 
urge the advisability of placing on the market the proceeds of convict labour, as 
well to create revenue as to afford the prisoners the means of learning trades. 

A number of officers are obliged to pay rent for the houses they occupy, ten 
only having been built by the Government for married men. I recommend that 
those who cannot be accommodated with lodgings be granted an allowance for rent 
in order that they be placed on the same footing with the men who have free houses 

xx 



Department of Justice. 

In an ad interim report from the Protestant Chaplain, he makes object ion to con- 
victs attending the Church of England service, provided, gratuitously, by Bishop 
Sillitoo. There is no just ground for this complaint. The same arrangement would 
be carried out, under similar circumstances, in each of the other penitentiaries) that 
is to say, were clergymen of the different denominations to volunteer their services 
and were accommodation available at the appointed hours for religious exerci 
The principle of permitting convicts to attend the worship of the church to which 
they belong has always been recognized by the Minister of Justice. The obstacles 
in the way, heretofore, have been the lack of clergymen to offer their services, in 
conformity with the prison hours and rules. The protest of the Chaplain, therefore, 
in view of the usage establised by the former Board of Directors, and which has been 
confirmed by successive Ministers of Justice, is inopportune and not in order. 

The Chaplain reports 43 convicts remaining in his care, at the end of the year, 
of whom 20 were Chinese, 3 Indians, 2 negroes and one half-breed, with 17 white 
men. "The conduct of the prisoners, while attending Divine tervice has," he says, 
" been very good." 

The Catholic chaplain has had 23 convicts under his charge. Their general con- 
duct, he states, "leaves little to be desired." He regrets that the accommodation 
for those attending school is not better. As at Dorchester, the school is held in the 
fla«: passage of the cell wing. At present nothing better can be provided, but when 
the new Chapels come to be built this want can be met. The choir is making satis- 
factory progress. Father Morgan also suggests that " the organist's remuneration 
is hardly commensurate with the labour involved and the time taken up." 

The Surgeon reports the health of the convicts to have been very good. It is 
fortunate the penitentiary escaped ihe small-pox which made its appearance in 
several places throughout the province. He says, — "The hospital overseer, Mr. 
Carroll, continues to discharge his duties in a most satisfactory manner." 

The school, under Mr. Keary, accountant, is conducted with the same careful 
attention and competency as in former years. The schoolmaster's task is a difficult 
one, requiring great patience and labour owing to the mixed races among the pupils. 
Withal his success in bringing them on is remarkable. Chinese, Indians and Italians, 
entirely ignorant of English, learn to read, write and cypher, very well, in a wonder- 
fully short time. Of those attending the school the Catholic chaplain says, — " their 
patience and assiduous attention to study certainly deserve praise." 

It is very probable that a change in the Wardenship will be necessary, on 
account of the ill-health of the present incumbent. Mi-. McBride entered the Colonial 
service, as Governor of the Victoria Gaol, in 1864. This gaol answered, also the 
purpose of a penitentiary, and a number of convicts — having long sentences, one a 
life man — were transferred from it, in 1878, to the penitentiary at New Westminster 
of which Mr. McBride was appointed Warden in June of that year. 

Regina G'aol. . 
This prison was opened nearly two years ago, for the accommodation of persons 
undergoing sentences, up to two years, from the North-west Territories. 

The gaoler, Mr. A. L. Lunan, has proved himself vevy competent for the posi- 
sition. Mrs. Lunan is matron. The other members of the staff are an assistant 
gaoler, an engineer, a stoker and three turnkeys. 

xxi 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Xo. 18.) A. 1893 

The following is the return of the prisoners admitted and discharged, during 
fiscal year, 1891-92 :— 

Males. Females. Total. 

Eemaining 30th June, 1891 8 1 9 

Received since do 52 5 57 

60 6 66 

Discharged since 30th June, 1891 43 6 49 

Eemaining 30th June, 1892 17 17 

Daily average 17. 

Xo deaths occurred since the opening of the gaol. 

The expenditure for the last financial year, was as follows : — 

Salaries $ 2,999 50 

Rations 1/241 30 

Prison clothing and officers' uniform 1,617 22 

Prison furnishing 4,825 29 

Total 10,683 31 



In the beginning the employe's, with the exception of the assistant gaoler and 
day engineer, performed their duties in a perfunctory and half-hearted fashion, and 
did not show their superior officer the respect to which he is entitled by his position. 
Upon being given to understand that their places could be readily filled, if they did 
not conform to discipline and rule, they accommodated themselves to the require- 
ments of their respective lines of duty and they now give satisfaction. 

The water supply is very defective and precarious. Two wells sunk by the 
Department of Public Works, are of no use. One has run dry altogether; the other 
contains only surface water unfit for drinking or cooking. The well, now dry, had 
been yielding a fair quantity when the employe's of the Public Works Department 
undertook to deepen the bore. Tbey succeeded in spoiling the well effectually. The 
water, in Pile of Bones Creek, which has been pumped up to the prison, for all 
domestic purposes, was run off in view of repairing the dam. This was done with- 
out any notice having been given to the gaoler, and at the almost certain risk of 
leaving the prison without water for the winter. Something must be done to pro- 
vide a perennial supply of good pure water for cooking and drinking. Nodoubt,in 
the spring, there will be abundance of soft water from the creek. 

A portion of the land outside the gaol wall should be fenced in so that the 
prisoners could have employment in tilling it. A good supply of potatoes and other 
vegetables required for the gaol can be produced. There should be also a fence in 
front of the gaol to keep off trespassers. I instructed the gaoler to submit for your 
approval, an item in the next estimates for barbed wire and posts. 

" The conduct of the prisoners, all round," the gaoler informs me, "is good." 
They were all kept employed, though it has been found difficult to provide work for 
them. The gaoler also tells me that the officers of the North-west Mounted Police, 
being justices of the peace, commit the best working men, among the prisoners who 
are brought before them, to the barrack prisons and send the useless and worn out 
characters to the gaol. This does not appear to be right or fair to an institution 
which might be made, in a measure, self-sustaining, by the results of the labour of 



xxn 



Department of Justice. 

men, capable of working, when well directed. I mention this matter for your 
consideration. 

I recommended that a house be elected, as soon ;»s possible, for the assistant 
gaoler, which met your approval. 

In order to carry on farming operations, an item will he required in (he 
estimates to buy a yoke of oxen, a plough, a couple of harrows and other agricul- 
tural implements. 

The manner in which the gaol is managed, its cleanliness and the good conduct 
maintained among the prisoners are creditable and satisfactory. 

The drainage is, now, good. The pit or reservoir for its discharge, and the 
cistern carts which I sent from Kingston for emptying it work admirably. Not the 
slightest bad odour is felt about the sewage tank. The same cannot be said of the 
ill-equipped and defective closets put in by the Department of Public Works. 

I beg leave to reiterate my sincere acknowledgments for your uniform prompt 
attention to the affairs of the several penitentiaries, which I have had occasion to 
bring before you, since rendering my last report. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. G. MOYLAN, 
Inspector of Penitentiaries for the Dominion of Canada. 
Department of Justice, 

Penitentiary Branch, 

Ottawa, 22nd December, 1892. 



xxm 



Department of Justice. 



KINGSTON PENITENTIARY. 



No. 1. 

REPORT OF THE WARDEN FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED 30th 

JUNE, 1892. 

Kingston Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the annual report of this penitentiary for 
the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

The number of convicts remaining 30th June, 1891, was 586 

Received since from jails 110 

do do other penitentiaries 6 

116 

702 

Discharged by expiration of sentence 123 

do pardon « 34 

do death , 9 

do escape 2 

Sent to lunatic asylum 2 

170 

Remaining on the 30th June, 1892 532 

In the distribution of the convicts, variety of work is secured, and the require- 
ments of the institution met in all its departments. 

The industry of the convicts is good, more marked when engaged in mechanical 
work than in other employments, showing a growing desire for work that will be 
useful to them when discharged. 

I have tried as far as possible to meet this preference in view of the motive, and 
would gladly extend or vary these industries, if present conditions in employment of 
convict labour were not so limited. 

Present and prospective improvements in buildings will doubtless, for some time 
to come, draw largely upon the men available for such work, and probably at the 
proper time, provision will be made, apart from building operations, for carrying on 
other industries in the prison of isolation, now nearing completion. 

The water tower will be covered in before wiuter, and the prison of isolation 
ready for occupation early in the spring. 

The mill is being dismantled, and when the machinery is removed, work on the 
new bakery will be commenced. 

The other changes ordered will be pushed as rapidly as possible, many of which 
will give employment suitable for winter work. The prison of isolation affords 
accommodation for 118 prisoners. This being a new departure, specia,l rules for its 
government, and industries suitable for cell work, are no doubt being considered, in 
view of utilizing this building at the earliest moment. 

It is to be hoped that the anticipated benefits arising from the classification of 
prisoners in this department may be realized. 

The discipline has been well maintained, and the conduct of the prisoners has in 
a marked manner improved. Fewer reports, and most of these not serious, are 
presented, a more ready disposition to obedience and a better appreciation of privi- 
18-— 1 

1 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

leges are manifest. I am satisfied that when the classification intended by the 
Prison of Isolation is made, by the separation of the troublesome class from the 
others, much more good will be accomplished. I cannot emphasize too strongly the 
importance of this course, when apart from disciplinary advantages, the deterrent 
effect of isolation upon repeaters cannot be but beneficial. The number of reeom- 
mitals, I am glad to state, is less than last year. We have still coming in a large 
number of young men under thirty years of age, about 58 per cent, and nearly 11 
per cent of the whole population under twenty years of age. These facts need no 
comment from me; they are understood and appreciated by the department at all 
events. 

Jn referring to the table of distribution of convicts, it will be seen that a system- 
atic classification of work is pursued. These several departments are, I am pleased 
to state, intelligently and carefully supervised. 

Two successful escapes were made during the year, particulars of which were 
reported to you at the time. 

The consolidation of the libraries has been successfully completed, and with the 
improved facilities for circulation, much confusion will be avoided. 

During the year unfavourable criticism as to our sanitary condition, and the 
effect of our sewage upon the health of the city of Kingston were made; investiga- 
tion has proved our excellent sanitary condition, and the minimum of danger from 
our sewage; nevertheless, the possible danger to our. water supply from sewage 
other than our own will require to be looked after. 

The decision reached to erect a female prison renders it unnecessary for me to 
mention again the unsuitableness of our present quarters. It does not come too 
soon. The same applies to our " insane ward." Humane considerations lead to the 
hope of early completion of these structures, and I have no doubt, from the thought 
already given them, they will be found well adapted for the purposes designed. 

Within the past few years much has been accomplished in developing appliances 
worthy of such an institution as this; our domestic system, as I might term it, is in 
excellent operation. The departments in charge ot the superintendent of works 
and the engineer have been tending rapidly to greater efficiency, and with the com- 
pletion of our water system, will place us second to none in all that is required for a 
public institution of this kind. 

All the labour has been done by convicts, and the work performed is of a char- 
acter inviting commendation. 

Society demands protection by depriving the criminal of his place in it, should 
it not favour and also require that while the prisoner remains a ward of the State, 
every means should be adopted to enable him to resume with safety when liberated 
the place he forfeited ? 

Therefore, all that has been and is proposed to be done here, will be found in 
the line tending to such humanizing effort without in any proper sense derogating 
from the merited punishment due to crime. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

M. LAVELL, 

Warden. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

J nspector of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 



Department of Justice. 

No. 2. 
Per Capita cost of Convicts, Kingston Penitentiary, for the year 1891-92. 

Daily Average 562 



Names 



"Salaries. . . . . 

Gratuity on retirement 

Officers' uniforms 

Rations.'. ... 

Convict clothing , 

do travelling allowance . 

do discharge clothing. . 

Bedding 

Interments 

Chapels 

Library 

Escapes 

Hospital 

Officers' mess 

Heating 

Light 

Repairs to buildings 

Maintenance of machinery . . 

Armoury 

Kitchen 

Stationery 

Farm 

Stables 

Maintenance of buildings. . . 

Industries 

Prison furnishing. 

Telegrams 

Postage stamps 

Freight charges. 

Express charges . 

Advertising 

Telephone 

Travelling expenses 

Magistrate fee : . 



X OS 

fS 



54,665 

1,228 

2,979 

24,921 

6,083 

1,820 

2,132 

1,650 

8 

532 

216 

137 

934 

1,964 

11,046 

5,755 

4,366 

1,237 

58 

744 

826 

1,075 

234 

12,935 

323 

660 

27 

76 

52 

' 25 

159 

90 

401 

12 



cts. 

27 
57 
4<) 
15 
80 
30 
83 
03 
00 
13 
61 
80 
78 
35 
08 
38 
85 
70 
80 
12 
oi 
30 
86 
86 
79 

01 

70 
00 
63 
85 
71 
00 
78 
00 



139,385 51 



is! 

t-H .49 : 

O 0) 

I'SI 



$ cts. 



566 00 

423 85 

2,153 07 



327 21 
1,155 60 



78 66 



EH 






cts. 



2,413 40 

24,497 30 

3,930 73 



1,805 62 
494 43 



856 12 



8,425 13 4,510 73 



'$ ' cts, 



630 38 

823 63 

,3,839 70 



288 97 
722 00 



71 25 



995 43 



$ cts . 

54,665 27 

1,228 57 

3,043 78 

25,320 93 

7,770 43 

1,820 30 

2,094 59 

1,210 43 

8 00 

532 13 

216 61 

137 80 

927 37 

1,964 35 

11,046 08 

5,755 38 

4,366 85 

1,237 70 

58 80 

744 12 

826 01 

1,075 30 

234 86 

5,506 16 

323 79 

660 01 

27 76 

76 00 

52 63 

25 85 

159 71 

90 00 

401 78 

12 00 



•s cts. 



237 80i 



Per capita cost $237 80^ 

Deduct for revenue 6 40§ 



Actual cost , $231 39| 

Or, per diem per convict $ 63f ^ 



S. W. SCOBELL, 

Accountant. 



18-li 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 3. 
EEPOET OF THE PEOTESTANT CHAPLAIN. 

Kingston Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

g IR> — l n presenting ray report for the year 1891-92, I have to state that the 
duties have been duly performed. 

I would wish to express my obligation to the Eev. Canon Fulton, Chaplain of 
St. Vincent de Paul, for his kind advice and assistance in securing proper specifica- 
tions for the new organ about to be erected in the chapel. 

In the schools the system -of convict monitors seems to work very well, better 
than I anticipated. 

In the library, the two libraries have been amalgamated, the religious works 
being retained separately in their respective chapels. My portion consists of 234 
volumes, and some sixty-seven men have drawn on them. 

During the year a number of fever cases occurred in the hospital, with unhappily 
some deaths, in spite of the care and attention bestowed on them by the surgeon and 
the hospital overseer. 

I am, sir, yours respectfully, 

C. E. CAETWEIGHT, 

Protestant Chaplain. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 



No. -A. 
EEPOET OF THE CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN. 

Kingston Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir, — I beg to forward you my report for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

I am happy to say I have not one disagreeable fact to record. My duties as 
chaplain are rendered pleasing and light by the ever-solicitous regard and cheerful 
assistance of the officers, one and all. The convicts also give me no unnecessary 
trouble. They are always respectful in and out of the chapel, and their constant 
attention to the instructions so often addressed to them shows their desire to 
become acquainted with the truths of our holy religion. Their becoming and 
reverential manner during mass and benediction with the most blessed sacrament 
is always most marked, and I might even add edifying. They attend to their reli- 
gious duties most faithful^, and all, with some few exceptions, fulfilled the church's 
obligation of confession and communion during the Easter time. This, in my 
opinion, is greatly due to the zeal of the Oblate Fathers who so ably conducted the 
missions of our diocese during last fall and spring. Whilst giving the mission in 
the cathedral they found time to visit the penitentiary to preach there and hear the 
confessions of all who might wish to approach the sacraments. The result was very 
pleasing. Many who had not been to confession for years yielded through means of 

-pecial grace and made their peace with God. 

After the mission 1 asked those men who for want of opportunity or through 
1 had never been confirmed or been to Holy Communion to form themselves 
i class for qpecial instruclion. The result surprised me. I found there were 
over twenty men and three women who had never received the grace of confirma- 
tion, and ten of them had never been to communion. Since the formation of the 
class, last December, we have had an addition of four more in the same pitiable 
condition. 

4 



Department of Justice. 

The amalgamation of the libraries has admirably succeeded in its purpose as 
far as m}' department is concerned. All books not treating of religious subjects 
were removed from our chapel library. This has had the effect of deepening the 
men's reverence for that holy place, as a place set apart entirely for God and our 
duties towards him. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JAMES Y1NCENT NEVILLE, 

Acting Chaplain. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 



No. 5. 
EEPOET OF THE SUEGEON. 

Portsmouth, Ont., 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour, once more, to present my report, this time for the year 
ended 30tb June, 1892. 

This prison was never in a more favourable position, as regards its hygienic con- 
dition, than at present, and the health of the convicts, on the whole, has been good; 
and although the number of admissions into the hospital last year exceeded those 
of the previous one by 63 (owing to an epidemic of "la grippe"), yet, the mortality 
has not been greater than in 1890-91. 

When we consider the ages of some of those who have departed this life hero 
since my last report, the thought must arise unless these prisoners had been well 
cared for by the authorities of the prison death would have claimed them long 
before, and I can safely say, without fear of contradiction, that none are better looked 
after than the inmates of this institution. Their food is wholesome and sufficient, 
their clothing, warm and comfortable in winter, cool in summer, their work not more 
laborious than labouring men outside are accustomed to, their hours both for retiring 
and rising early ; the dormitory and workshops well ventilated; thay have books 
with which to occupy their minds when in their cells, and were it not for the small- 
ness of these cells more comforts at night than the majority of men of their class 
have out&ide these walls. 

Among the list of deaths, you will observe, two have died beyond the age of 80, 
both life prisoners, one from the female, the other from the insane ward. Two deaths 
occurred from phthisis; one of those who died from this cause had been in the 
hospital more than nineteen months; two from pneumonia, one over 80 years of age, 
the other was a helpless case when received into hospital, and was, as the deputy 
warden remarked, dying on his feet in the yard. He only lived five days after having 
been admitted. One of those who died from typhoid fever had been a very dissipated 
character before he came into prison, and his constitution having been broken down 
by his former habits of life, he succumbed to the disease in a few days. 

The number received into hospital during tho last twelve months was 283, and 

9 remained on 30th June, 1892. 

The number of prescriptions during the past year independent of those for 
hospital patients amounted to 2,401 for the male and 328 for the female prisoners; so 
you can easily imagine from the above that a convict, here, sutfering from the 
slightest ailment is attended to at once. 

We have at the present time old men who will not, in my opinion, live to com- 
plete their terms of imprisonment. One over 70 whose sentence will not expire for 

10 years, another 78 years old, a very feeble man, who was sentenced for live years, 
some 21 months since, and who was in hospital the greater part of last winter and 
spring ; a third, feeble and weak-minded. 

5 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

Eleven under the age of 20 have been received here since my last report, and. 
only one over 74, a more favourable showing than in 1890-91. 

We have not been visited with any. epidemic with the exception of " la grippe." 
Last year in my report I mentioned the great benefit we had derived from the 
use of ferrometers in rendering the drains almost free from noxious gases. Nine 
more of these ferrometers are to be placed in other buildings, to connect with other 
drains, in order to bring the danger of any disease arising from impurities from the 
sewers to a minimum. ■ - 

Insane Ward. 

The number in this ward at present is 27. In the year just ended there have 
been admitted, 8; discharged, cured, 3; improved sufficiently to resume work, 2; 
transferred to a provincial asylum, 1; died, 2. The majority of those remaining are 
incurable, mentally. Some few, however, show slight symptoms of improvement, 
and I hope before long to be able to send them to work in the yard. 

Female Department. 

Things would run much more smoothly here were we not obliged to keep in the 
ward people of unsound mind. At present we have two ssuch. We have no proper 
place in which to confine these unfortunate creatures, and those whose minds are 
not affected, and who will not believe that those mentally disordered are so, become 
very exasperated from being disturbed at night by the noises they make. This 
causes a great deal of trouble to the matron and deputy matron and renders it almost 
impossible to prevent the sane female prisoners from repeatedly violating the rules' 
of the institution. 

A number of accidents occurred this last year. The serious ones, requiring 
hospital treatment for any length of time, were the following: compound comrai- 
nuted fracture of the femur; fraeture of the humerus; injury to left eye, in conse- 
quence of which the convict who met with this accident lost the little sight he had 
remaining in that eye when he was received into prison ; contused wound of scalp. 

Many of the guards have been ailing during the year; no less than 626 pre- 
scriptions have been dispensed for them in that time. 

The tables appended show the number treated in hospital, and the nature of the 
diseases for which they were treated. 

Mr. Gunn, the hospital overseer, continues to .^charge his duties in a very 
satisfactory manner. 

I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

O. S. STRANGE, 
Surgeon, Kingston Penitentiary. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



Department of Justice. 

, tfo. 6. 

KINGSTON PENITENTIARY. 
Annual Return of Sick treated in Hospital, from 1st July, 1891, to 30th June, 1892. 



Disease. 

% 


S 


Admitted. 


3 

o 
H 


o 

s 


1 

be 
E 

3 

o 
56 

s 


bb 

'2 

a 

M 


Remarks. 






5 


5 




5 
































3 
4 

15 


3 
4 

15 




3 
4 

15 






Boils 






Bronchitis, acute and chronic 
















2 
1 
4 


2 

1 
4 




2 
1 
4 












Cephalalgy 












Colic 




13 

1G 

...... 

1 
4 
2 
4 
1 
5 
7 


13 
16 

1 
6 

I 

2 
4 
1 
5 

7 


► 


13 
16 
1 
6 
1 
4 
2 
•4 
1 
5 
6 


..... 




Contusion , 






Cystitis ... 


i 








do simplex 






Debility 












Dysentery 


















Epilepsy 






Erysipelas 






Febricula 




20 


20 




20 






Fever, intermittent 






do typhoid . , 

Fistula in ano. 


5 


20 


25 


3 


20 


2 




I racture C. C 




1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 




1 
1 
1 












do humerus 






Oelatio 






Hemicrania 




1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
G 
1 




1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 






Heart disease 






Hemoptysis 






Herpes Zoster 






Hernia 






Hysteria 






Hsemophilea 






Haematemesis 






Hemorrhoids 




1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

58 
5 
2 
4 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 

18 
1 
1 
2 
3 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

58 
5 
3 
4 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
2 
1 

18 
1 
1 
2 
3 


"Y 
i 
1 

"*i 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

58 
5 
2 
4 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

16 


"i" 

*2 




Icterus 






Injury to eye 






Inserting bottle in rectum 






Indigestion 






Influenza (la grippe) 






Lumbago 






Malingering 


1 




Neuralgia 




Otalgia 






Ophthalmia 






Peritonitis 






Parotites 






Purpura 






Phthisis 


1 




Pneumonia 




do chronic 


1 




Pleuritis 




Rheumatism 






Senile decay 












i 




Sciatica '. 






2 
3 

















^Insane. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 6. 

KINGSTON PENITENTIAKY. 

Annual Eeturn of Sick treated in Hospital, &c. — Concluded. 



A. 1893 



Disease. 


g 
'3 


1 

'a 

< 


3 


1 


1 
be 


i 

a 

1 


Remarks. 


Stricture 
















Scrofula 




















2 

1 
1 


2 

1 

1 




2 
1 

1 










Torticollis 






Ulcers 






TJraemic convulsions 




1 

7 
1 


1 
7 
1 




1 
6 
1 


"Y 










Whitlow 












Total 


9 


283 


292 


8 


275 


9 









Kingston Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 



O. S. STEANGE, M.D., 

Surgeon, Kingston Penitentiary. 



Department of Justice. 



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Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



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Department of Justice. 

No. 9. 

Annual Eeturn of Criminal Insane Convicts in the Insane Asylum, in connection 
■with the above Penitentiary, from 1st July, 1891, to 30th June, 1892. 



Distribution. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




27 
v 9 




27 


Since admitted :— 




9 
























British Columbia do 
















Total number under treatment during the above period .... 


36 




36 








Discharged : — 


3 
3 
1 
2 




3 


Improved sufficiently to resume work 




3 


Transferred to Provincial Asylum on expiration of sentence 




1 


Died 




2 










27. 




27 









OBITUARY. 



No. 


Req. 
No. 

8636 
4762 


Age. 


Date of Death. 


Duration 

of 
Insanity. 


Proximate Cause 
of Death. 


Remarks. 


1 
2 


46 

81 


Aug. 1, 1891.... 
June 21, 1892. . . . 


7 years, 270 days. 
33 years, 143 days 


Marasmus 

Senile decay 


Died out of hospital. 



O. S. STEANGE, M.D., 

Surgeon, Kingston Penitentiary. 



Kingston Penitentiary, 

Insane Asylum, 1st July, 1892. 



11 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 10. 

INSANE WARD, KINGSTON PENITENTIARY. 

Nominal Roll of Convicts admitted into the Insane Ward of the above Institution 
between the 1st July, 1891, and 30th June, 1892. 





Name. 


Date of admission. 


From 
whence 
received. 


How 

disposed 

of. 


: : Remaining under treatment 30th 
: M M : • June, 1892. 




No. 


"-£ 
P 
03 

"3 

ft 

! 

03 

to 


1 
B 
o 


| 

w 
O 

1— 1 


Remarks as to present 

state of those 

under treatment. 


1 


White Eye A 


July 8, '91 

Sep. 10, '91 
Dec, 30, '91 
do 31, '91 
Jan. 11, '92 
Feb. 9, '92 
May 16, '92 
Mar. 16, '92 
Jun. 7, '92 


1 




1 


This man suffering from epilepsy 
is not insane, but committed 
for safety. 


?. 


White Eye A 

Gilbaut, Octave 


3 






Slight improvement. 


4 
5 


Johnston, George 

Harrison, Valentine 

Berrill, George 


l 

l 




6 


1 


"i"' 




7 


Andrews, William 

Berrill, George 


No improvement. 


a 


l 






9 


Thomas, Charles 

Total 


1 








9 


3 


3 


3 













O. S. STRANGE, M.D., 

Surgeon, Kingston Penitentiary. 



No. 11. 
REPORT OF THE MATRON. 

Kingston Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir. — I herewith submit my annual report of the work performed in the female 
department of this penitentiary. 

During the past year there were 1 death, 2 pardons, 3 discharges, 8 received, 
leaving 26 at present. 

I am, sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

R. A. FAHEY, 

Matron. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries 



12 



Department of Justice. 

No. 12. 
.Return of Work done in Female Department for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



No. of 

Articles. 



131 

203 

228 

333 

1060 

173 

89 

208 

141 

701 

508 

3 



156 



Work done. 



Equal to 
Days. 



Fine shirts 

Cotton shirts 

Pillowslips 

Sheets 

Towels 

Handkerchiefs 

Pairs mitts 

Pairs socks 

Pairs sleeves 

Pairs drawers 

Flannel shirts 

Surplices ' , 

Making carpet 

Female Prison. 

Sewing and knitting, house work, washing 
cooking 

Government Contract. 
Flannel shirts 



131 

203 

38 

167 

88 

15 

189 

208 

141 

701 

508 

3 

3 



3,285 



156 



Rate 
per 
Day. 



Cents. 

30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 



30 



Amount. 



$ cts. 

39 30 

60 90 

11 40 

50 10 

26 40 

4 50 

26 70 

62 40 

42 30 

210 30 

152 40 

90 

90 



Total. 



•S ct.s. 



686 70 



1,015 00 



46 80 



1,748 50 



No. 13. 



E. A. FAHEY, 

Matron. 



REPOKT OF THE SCHOOLMASTER 



Kingston Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report of the school in this peniten- 
tiary for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

The conduct of the men and progress made has been very satisfactory. Number 
of scholars on roll 98, with an average daily attendance of 90. The branches taught 
are reading, writing, spelling and elementary arithmetic. Those who attend school 
appear to fully appreciate the privilege extended to thern. Many thanks are due 
the warden for the interest he has taken in this department, also to the chaplains 
and assistant teachers for their zeal in the cause of education. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



J. B. P. MATHEWSON, 

Schoolmaster. 



J. Gr. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



13 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (Xo. 1 



A. 1893 



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14 



Department of Justice. 



No. 15. 

Statement of the Movements of Convicts at the Kingston Penitentiary for the 
Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Description. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 

24 

8 


Total. 










502 
108 




Received since : — 


108 


2 



110 
6 


580 


From other penitentiaries 






121 

32 

2 

8 
1 


110 




2 
2 

1 


123 

34 

2 

9 

2 


Discharged since : — 


070 
104 


32 

, 6 


702 










Death 




Sent to asylum 






170 










Remaining - at midnight of the 30th June, 1892 


50G 


20 


532 














No. 16. 

List of Convicts who have been pardoned out of the Kingston Penitentiary during 
the Year ended the 30th June, 1892. 



No. 



Name. 



William Hayes. 
Mortimer Schell. 
Frederick Jarvis 



4 Nellie Taylor 

5 James Ogelvie 

6 Edgar Teadman 

7 i Harry Horsey. .... 

8 jMaude Stephenson. . 

9 ; Henry Harding 

10 J Victor Milburn 

11 'James Washington. . 

12 William Baldwin... 

13 Clove Baldwin 

14 (Alexander Newman. 

15 iRobert Murphy 

10 [Edward Cardo 



17 Charles Carey. 

18 Arthur P. Davis.... 

19 Geo. Catellier, 

20 S. L. Hollingsworth. 

21 E. H. Hayes 

22 Duncan Currie 

23 John Lamb 

24 William Buckley ... . 

25 Christie Carter 

20 Arthur Pinel 

27 William Jones 

28 John Grey 

29 Wm. Minnhinick . . . 

30 Thomas Agget 

31 Timothy Depew 

32 Joseph Gigg 

33 |Chas. H. Brown.... 
Henry Sare 



34 



Crime. 



Rape 

Larceny 

Shopbreaking and larceny 
Larcenv 

do * 

Burglary 

Arson 

Larceny 

Murder 

Forgery 

Post office robbery 

Larceny 

do 

Arson 

Manslaughter 

Rape 

do 

Murder 

Post office robbery 

do do 

do do 

Larceny 

Larceny and burglary. . . . 

Rape 

Larceny 

Post office robbery 

Larceny 

do 

do 

Murder 

Robbery 

Arson 

Forgery 

Burglary 



Place. 



idG. 



York. 

Bruce. 

Waterloo. 

Westmoreland. 

York. 

Stormont, D. a 

Frontenac. 

Annapolis. 

Essex. 

Peterborough. 

Essex. 

Victoria. 

do 
Frontenac. 
Quebec. 
York. 
Perth. 
York. 
Carleton. 

do 

do 
Bruce. 
Norfolk. 
Quebec. 
Carleton. 
York. 
Bruce. 
Elgin. 

Stormont, D. and G. 

Wentworth. 

Ontario. 

Kent. 

Middlesex. 



15 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 
No. 17. 



A. 1893 



Eeturn of Convicts who have died in the Kingston Penitentiary during the Year 

ended 30th June, 1892. 



No. 


Name. 


Crime. 


Place. 


1 




Murder 


Leeds and Grenville. 


2 






Halton. 


3 




Accessory to murder 


Terrebonne. 


4 




Burglary 


York. 


5 


Walter Coad 


Larceny and horse-stealing 

do receiving 

Doing grievous bodily harm 

Larceny 


Simcoe. 


G 


Wm. Marshall 


Went worth. 


7 




York. 


8 


Peter Connors 


do 


9 


Rape 


Perth. 









No. 18. 

Eeturn of Convicts recommitted to the Kingston Penitentiary for the Year ended 

30th June, 1892. 



No. 


Name. 


<D 
'jjj 

a 

o 

o 

B 

4J 

m 

T— 1 


a 

B 

1 

a 

o 
o 

a 


a 

a 
a 

o 
o 

CO 


1 

'i 

a 

o 
o 


1 


• 
Elizabeth Phelan 


1 








2 


Michael Callaghan 


1 


3 


Richard Harris 






1 




4 


Thomas Johnston 


1 






5 


George Clark 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




6 


Stanley McFarlane 








7 


James Collins 






8 


John Ross 






9 


Amedee Paquette 








10 


John Stoddard 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






11 


George Murray 






12 


1 >avid Dunlop 








13 


( reorge Stone 








14 


James Clark 




L6 


Frank Ryan 








L6 


Edward ( ringras 

Frank Churchill 








17 








18 


( !harles McGee 








19 


Thos. Spellman 






1 















16 



Department of Justice. 

No. 19. 

Summary of Punishments awarded at the Kingston Penitentiary for the Year ended 

30th June, 1892. 



Months. 


§ 

o 
H 
a> 

CO 

O 


1$ fee 


1 

ft 

.s=§ 


I 

13 

cO 


T3 

u 
bo 

f 

d 


$ 

OB 

w a- 
d-S 


1 
5.9 

pg g 


<*- 

o 

o 

dec 


o 

> . 

d^ 


-4-S 

o . 
Xi 4a 

" fcc 


e 

80 



£ 
d 


1891. 
July ... 






19 

28 
27 

4 
15 

4 

4 

2 
7 
3 
8 

7 








18 

35 

28 

5 

9 

1 

3 
2 

9 
2 

8 








9 


2 
2 






2 


2 


3 


4 






1 


36 


4 








1 






4 








2 








3 


12 












1 


1892. 
January 




1 
1 

2 
1 








2 




2 










1 








1 


'"i" 


4 


April 

May . . 


1 






2 


1 


1 


36 


1 






1 




2 


1 



















No. 20. 

Return showing the Remission of Sentence earned by Convicts discharged from 
the Kingston Penitentiary during the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 





No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


No. of 




Men. 


Days. 


Men. 


Days. 


Men. 


Days. 


Men. 


Days. 




1 


15 


1 


143 


1 


174 


1 


362 




1 


78 


1 


145 


1 


175 


13 


365 




1 


84 


1 


146 


3 


178 


1 


499 




2 


89 


1 


150 


24 


180 


1 


534 




3 


91 


1 


151 


1 


230 


1 


535 




1 


93- 


1 


156 


1 


263 


1 


536 




10 


96 


1 


157 


1 


269 


3 


546 




1 


101 


1 


159 


8 


270 


1 


623 




1 


108 


2 


160 


2 


313 


1 


801 




1 


124 


2 


165 


1 


318 


2 


810 




1 


132 


1 


I 166 


1 


326 


1 


820 




2 


133 


2 


167 


2 


352 


1 


822 




1 


136 


1 


168 


1 


353 


1 


1,128 




1 


137 


44 




1 


354 








1 


138 


1 


173 


2 


361 


123 





18—2 



17 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 21. 



A. 1893 



Eeturn showing the value of Labour and number of Days' Work, exclusive of 
Material, done in the Kingston Penitentiary during the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Various Departments. 



Carpenter and trades department 

Masons and stonecutters 

Blacksmith and machine shops . . . 

Tailor shop 

Shoe shop 

Female prison 

Farm, stables, teamsters, &c 

Bakery 

Dining hall, kitchen, and library . 
Wings and officers' mess room.. . . 

Wash-house 

Dry room 

Grist mill 



No. of 
Days. 



14,277 

64,376 

9,711 

12,113 

6,611 

5,736 

6,784 

1,840 

6,573 

6,429 

2,568 

7,700 

600 



Value. 



$ cts. 

7,138 50 
32,188 00 
4,855 50 
6,056 50 
3,305 50 
1,720 80 
2,713 60 

920 00 
2,629 20 
2,571 60 
1,027 20 
3,080 00 

240 00 



68,446 40 



No. 22. 



Eeturn showing the number of Volumes in the General Library of the Kingston 
Penitentiary, the number of Convicts who have used books, number of volumes 
issued during the Year and the number added. 



— 


— 


Total. 


Number of volumes at beginning of year 


2,646 
405 










3,051 
371 


do prisoners using Library 




do volumes issued 




12,513 









18 



Department of Justice. 

No. 23. 

Statement of Expenditures and Eeceipts of the Kingston Penitentiary Flour Mill, 
for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Description. 



To 2,624£& bush, wheat 

2,434§g do 

724H do 

M iller's salary 

600 days' labour of two convicts . 

30 tons coal 

Oils, &c 



By 2,820 bags of flour 

26H&A tons of bran 

K.l |f tons of shorts 

Grinding for stable and farm . 
Balance 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



17* 

17" 
06 



40 
4 30 



2 46 

16 00 

17 00 



Debits 



$ cts. 

2,952 97 

2,848 91 

767 83 

700 00 

240 00 

129 00 

20 00 



7,658 71 



Credits. 



$ cts. 



6,937 20 

425 00 

147 42 

30 00 

119 09 



7,658 71 



O'CONNOK, 

Miller. 



No. 24. 



Farm Account, Kingston Penitentiary, for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 
Dr. Cr. 



Description. 



Amount. 



To Farm and garden seed. . . . 

Manure 

Sulphur 

Ginger 

Sulphuric acid 

Saltpetre 

Labour, 20 convicts 

Salary, farm instructor . . . 

do 2 guards 

do 1 guard 

2 span horses 

2 teamsters 

Pig feed from dining hall. 
Balance 



$ cts. 

95 93 

109 25 

4 20 

2 20 

1 80 

75 

2,110 00 

700 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

600 00 

700 00 

75 00 

224 87 



6,024 00 



Description. 



Rate. 



By 90 tons hay ; 

70 tons straw 

900 bush, potatoes 

1,500 do oats 

400 do pease 

1,100 do barley 

200 do carrots 

1,000 do beets. 

600 do parsnips 

52 do beans . ... 

100 do tomatoes 

50 do corn , 

237 do onions 

600 do turnips 

200 heads cauliflowers 

3,000 do celery 

5,000 do lettuce 

15,000 do cabbage 

400 doz.ears green corn, per doz 

500 bunches herbs 

12,000 lbs. pork 

100 loads pumpkins 



! cts. 

8 00 
5 00 
40 
35 
70 
50 
40 
40 

50 

1 00 
50 

50 

1 00 
30 
10 
03 
01 
05 
10 
05 

07 

1 00 



Amount. 



$ cts. 

720 00 

350 00 

360 00 

525 00 

280 00 

550 00 

80 00 

400 00 

300 00 

52 00 

50 00 

25 00 

237 00 

180 00 

20 00 

90 00 

50 00 

750 00 

40 00 

25 00 

840 00 

100 00 



6,024 00 



N. 



P. WOOD, 
Farmer. 



19 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



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20 



Department of Justice. 

No. 26. 
Details of Expenditure of Kingston Penitentiary for the year ending 30th June, 1892. 



Staff Salaries. 
Warden, M. La veil. . . 


$ cts . 

3,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,800 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

800 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 

1,300 00 

1,300 00 

800 00 

700 00 

900 00 

530 00 

590 00 

600 00 

600 00 

260 00 
700 00 
700 00 
700 00 

2,800 00 
690 00 

1,260 00 
600 00 

1,200 00 
590 00 
530 00 

1,500 00 

14,500 00 

920 00 

3,010 00 

1,600 00 

1,000 00 
500 00 
800 00 
600 00 

285 27 

54,665 27 

261 14 
967 43 


Un if onus, Officers' — Concluded. 

Cement, bristles, boot polish and laces, 

Beeswax, sweat bands, boot web and 

shoe thread 


s cts. 

is 7:, 


Deputy warden, William Sullivan 


27 60 


Accountant, S. W. Scobell 


Nails, tacks, awls and eylets 


7 98 


Chaplain (Pro.), Rev. C. E. Cartwright 
do (R.C.), Rev. J. S. Quinn 


Art Journal, Book of Fashions, tailoring 
department 


10 00 


Warden's clerk, Robert R. Creighton. 


Mations. 

Beef, 14,876 lbs. at $6.40 per ewt 

Mutton, 6,358 lbs. at $7 per cwt 

Sugar, 17,197 lbs. at 4|c 




2,979 40 






Chief instructor, James Adams 

Engineer, James Devlin 

Electrician, Charles Baylie 


9,520 64 

445 02 


Steamfitter, Charles Munroe 


752 37 


Steward, James Weir 


Tea, 3,595 lbs. at 20c. 

Butter, 6,054 lbs. at 17c 


719 00 


Hospital overseer, Wm. A. Gunn 

Schoolmaster, divided among 4 guards. 
Messenger, M. J. Kennedy 


1,029 18 


Barley, 6,587 lbs. at 2^c. . . 


164 68 


Rice, 5,137 lbs. at 4c 


205 48 


Matron, Rose' Ann Fahey 


Oatmeal, 692 lbs. at 2|c 


19 03 


Deputy matron, Mary Smith 


Salt, 39,962 lbs. at ^c 

Tobacco, 2,400 lbs. at 50c 


199 81 


Miller, P. O'Connor 


1,200 00 


Baker, Wm. Coward 


Vinegar, 388 galls, at 14c 


54 33 


Farmer and gardener, Neil P. Wood.. . 
Trade instructors, 4 at $700 


Pepper, 420 lbs. at 10c 

Fish, 3,1751bs 

Wheat, 5,793 bush 


42 00 
131 00 


do 1 

do 2 at $630. 


6,579 98 
1,339 00 


do 1 

Keepers, 2 at $600 


Bacon, 11,598 lbs , 

Potatoes, 3,428 bush 


975 85 
1,220 00 


do 1 


Beans, 43 bush 


53 90 


do 1 


Pease, 39 bush . , 


13 85 


do 3 at $500 


Onions, 9 bush 


10 38 


Guards, 29 at $500 


Malt, hops and yeast 


58 47 


do 2 at $460 




51 30 


do 7 at $430 




31 40 


do 4 at $400 




104 48 




Convicts'' Clothing. 

Grey and checked cloth, 1,483 yds 

Grey flannel, 2,211 yds 




Stoker, 1 .' 


24,921 15 


Teamsters, 2 at $400 




do 2 at $300 




Supplementary guards during sickness 
among the officers 


710 02 

885 85 




Grey cloth, 2,769 yds 

Moleskin, 904 yds 


1,246 28 
336 00 


Gratu ities. 


Forfar linen, 658 yds 


141 32 


Sarah Burke, sr 


Crash lining, 1,160 yds 

Silesia lining, 102 yds 

Cotton, grey, 2,876 yds 


126 00 
11 97 


Jeremiah O'Driscoll 


229 74 




Duck 560^ yds 


96 10 




1,228 57 


Drilling, 2,474 yds 


228 62 


Uniforms, Officers'. 




37 48 


713 19 

314 74 

106 40 

267 40 

160 88 

70 91 

31 09 

49 21 

19 24 

34 74 

150 50 

86 09 

54 49 

88 05 

89 60 
41 55 

225 84 
91 83 
30 25 

190 36 
98 71 


Print, 59 yds 


9 08 


Blue serge, 1,197| yds 


Flannel, white, 25 yds 


12 50 


Worsted coating, 259 yds 


Coating, 23 yds 


15 20 


Broadcloth, 28 yds . 


Woollen yarn, 942 lbs. . . 


394 15 


Silesia and Italian cloth, 1,321 yds 

Tweed and grey frieze cloth, 2364; yds. . 
Print and Holland, 742 yds.. 


185 65 


Woollen scarfs, mufflers and shawls. . . . 


82 00 
40 34 


Twilled cotton and canvas, 268 yds 

Doeskin, 31| yds 


Needles, thimbles, tape measures and 


137 16 


Grey cotton and hair cloth, 193 yds 

Merino and towels 


Scissors, tailors' irons and benzine. . . . 


49 81 
33 67 


Officers' gold crowned buttons. . . 




15 25 


do fur caps and hats 




33 30 


do braid 


Leather, sole, 2,590 lbs. . 


417 15 


Machine and silk twist 




51 89 


Linen and cotton spools 




86 35 


W adding, buttons and hooks and eyes . 

French and Canadian kip leather 

Pebble and welt leather 

Russets and kid skins 


do upper 

do calfskins 

Brushes, bristles, cement and emery 

straps 

Sponges, ink, camphor, needles and 
shoe thread 


83 75 
9 80 

32 15 


Sole leather, 1,029 lbs 






23 10 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 26. — Details of Expenditure of Kingston Penitentiary, &c. — Continued. 



Convicts' Clothing — Concluded. 

Boot tree, sand-paper and wax 

Knives, rasps and pegs 

Xails, tacks, awls and leather boot laces 
J. Cunningham , — 

2 new sewing machines and repairing 
old ones 

Freight on cloth, &c 



Convicts' 1 Travelling Allowance. 

1 convict 

1 do 

1 do 

22 do $8.00. 

6 do $9.00 

56 do $10.00 

3 do $11.00 ;.. 

33 do $12.00 

1 do 

1 do 

20 do $15.00 

9 do $20.00...* 

2 do $25.00 

1 do 



Discharge Clothing. 



$ cts. 

26 16 
17 25 
61 30 



160 62 
56 79 



80 



4 00 

5 00 

6 00 
176 00 

54 00 

560 00 

33 00 

300 00 

12 30 

14 00 

300 00 

180 00 

50 00 

30 00 



1,820 30 



Cloth, tweed, 1,472 yds 

Cloth, Italian, 435 yds 

Canvas, 1,000 

Drilling, 708i yds 

Cotton, white, 614 yds 

Print, 468 vds 

Holland, 149£ yds 

Linen and cambric, 91 yds 

Hats and caps 

Underclothing 

Shawls and bonnets, for women 

Silesia, 657 yds 

Cotton, grey, 121| yds 

Wadding 

Linen thread, twist, machine silk and 

thread 

Collars, braces and ties 

Buttons, thimbles, &c 

Woollen yarn, mufflers and socks 

Leather, sole, 392 lbs 

do Canadian and French kip,1001bs 

do pebble and sheepskins 

do welt 

Boot laces, shoe thread and bristles. . . . 



Bedding, 

Blankets and rugs, 843. . . 

Ticking, 1,262 yds 

Sheeting, «S90| yds 

Cotton, twilled, 615 yds. . 

Needles and twine 

Iron eyes and bolts 

John Tinner & Co. — 
1 wire weaving machine 



Cha/peh. 

Organ for Protestant chapel 

( larpets, .'>7 ! yds 

( landles, wax, :« Lbs 

V. tinents, Sec., kc 



885 03 

114 92 

80 00 

78 77 
66 23 
26 39 
21 53 
14 08 

150 63 
157 00 
14 50 
65 70 
10 23 
25 00 

123 40 
35 81 
25 92 

79 34 
76 02 
48 00 
13 32 

8 50 
12 51 

2,132 83 



1,215 65 
189 37 
SO 0.3 
57 43 
12 25 
11 30 

75 00 

1,650 03 



400 0© 

39 38 
13 95 
50 16 



Chapels — Concluded 

Oil and wine, for communion 
Incense, &c, &c. .......... 

Dusters and covers 

Oil-cloth and glue 

Tuning organ, R. C. chapel 



Interments. 

Clothing and fittings of 4 convicts 

Library. 

Books for library 

Duck for covering books, 20 yds. . 
Drill do do 30 yds.. 
Glue do do 



Escapes. 

Officer's expenses in search of convict 
Wm. McKay 

Officer's expenses in search of convict 
Manson.. i 

Officer's expenses in search of convict 
Ferguson .... 

Donation to Toronto police 



Hospital. 

Milk, 1,395 galls at 16c 

Hospital comforts 

Sundries for 'Xmas dinner 

Carpets, mats, baskets and d usters . . . 

Turpentine, lard and soap 

Crockery and rubber sheeting 

Garth & Co., for copper boiler to bath 

Medicine 

Appliances and sundries 



Officers' Mess. 



Beef, 10,617 lbs. at $6.40 per cwt. . . 
Mutton, 1,432 lbs. at $6.40 do ... 

Butter, 1,617 lbs. at 17c 

Sugar, 920 lbs. at 4§c 

Tea, 160 lbs. at 20c 

Bread, 6,080 lbs. at l^c 

Flour, 1,300 lbs. at $2". 60 per cwt. . . 

Potatoes, 294 bush, at 50c 

Coffee, 160 lbs. at 40c 

Fish, 1,670 lbs 

Rice, 250 lbs 

Milk, 964 galls..... 

Raisins, currants, figs, tapioca and corn 

starch 

Spices, essences, assorted peels and 

mustard 

Eggs and apples 

Crockery, and knives and forks 



$ cts. 

4 38 

7 20 

4 05 

8 01 

5 00 

532 13 



8 00 



202 51 

3 50 

4 50 
6 10 



216 61 



21 83 

10 40 

55 57 
50 00 



Heating. 

Coal, egg, 2,063,&fo tons at $4.58 

do soft, 100 tons at $4.70 

do chestnut, 19£££# tons at $4.72. . . . 

Wood, hard, 20(5,^ cords at $3.95 

Castings 

Repairs to boilers 



137 80 



223 90 

16 10 

9 53 

21 28 

22 70 
11 83 

129 83 

413 53 

86 08 

934 78 



679 48 
91 75 

274 21 
40 25 

32 00 
91 20 

33 80 II 
147 00 

84 00 
140 67 I 

10 00 j 
154 24 (I 

72 29 

34 34 i! 
53 52': 
25 60;' i 



1,064 35 



0,448 88 

470 001 

04 10 

816 33! 

43 02} 

20 00J 



22 



Department of Justice. 

No. 26. — Details of Expenditure of Kingston Penitontiary, &c. — Continued. 



Heating — Concluded. 



Steam hose 

Canada plate 

Nozzles, flanges, elbows, &c., &c. . . . 
Steel scoops, flue cleaners, and water 
pan 



Light. 

Coal, e$g, 558^%% tons at $4.58 

do od, 773 galls 

Poison Iron Works, boiler 

John Markam 

J. Muckleston & Co 

Perkins Electric Lamp Co 

Toronto Construction Co 

Gas oil, 3,200 galls 

Fire-brick and clay 

Elbows, T. , clamps, valves, sockets and 
rings 

Machine oil and boiler compound 

Silk cord, lamps, reflectors, and rubber 
tubing 

Oil covers, flanges, sand-paper and saw- 
dust 

Candles and matches 

Belting, files and copper 

Castings and sockets 



Repairs to Buildings. 

Lumber 

Iron, assorted 

Machine and caststeel, 3,086 lbs 

Castings, sheet iron, lowmoor iron and 

galvanized iron 

Nails, tacks, bolts, hinges and butts. . . 

Screws, sheet lead, zinc and wire 

Tools, carpenters', blacksmiths' and 

tinsmiths' 

Shovels, locks and keys, hoop iron and 

sash fastening 

Mixed paints for roofing. 

White lead, varnish, shellac, &c 

Glass, putty, whiting and ochre 

Glue, sand-paper, chalk and fitches .... 
Copperas, borax, solder and neatsfoot 

oil 

Blue, gold leaf, spongts, &c 

Buckles, hooks and eyes, rules, &c 

Drills, washers, alabastine, &c 

Fire-clay, bricks and sand 

Coal, blacksmith, 54 tons 

Wood, soft, 157 cords 

Cleaning drains 

Cement, 82 brls . 

Shingles and emery wheels 

Boiled oil, 84 galls 

Manilla rope and brushes 



Maintenance of Machinery. 

Packing and cotton waste 

Flanges, elbows, globes, pipe and T . . . 

Belting, lacing and oilers 

Twist drills and wrenches 

Repairs to boilers 

Cashman chuck 

Steam pump fittings 

Copper and steel wire, files and knives. 
Steam gauge, bolts and polish 



> cts. 

31 00 
10 95 
73 43 

10 47 



11,040 08 



2,556 08 
121 36 
809 00 
542 70 
258 00 
228 00 
335 15 
144 00 
154 26 

91 81 
110 30 

43 00 

25 42 

49 59 

60 16 

136 55 

5,755 38 



1,285 34 
161 44 
298 60 

108 11 
125 55 
177 46 

100 43 

90 20 
329 57 
60 24 
54 82 
57 40 

41 93 

12 57 
34 77 
72 30 
88 27 

251 39 

433 33 
96 00 

275 25 
50 30 
56 37 

105 21 



4,366 85 



250 10 
131 83 
77 87 
42 05 
48 63 
35 00 
40 00 
23 86 
6 82 



Maintenance of Machinery. — Con. 

Patent drills, Swede iron and machine 
steel 

Twine and candle wick 

Parker & Evans, machine oil and boiler 
compound 

John Markum, machinery 



Armoury. 



12,000 cartridges.. 
Cleaning fire-arms . 



Kitchen. 

Soap, 8,804 lbs. at 4c 

Potash, 1,150 lbs 

Borax, 230 lbs 

Brooms, 40 doz. at $2.54 

Starch and blue 

Spoons, knives and forks 

Goggles and spectacles 

Brushes and combs 

Meat cutter and potato pealer 

Pots and kittles, locks and keys 

8 boxes tin, at $6.75 

Common soap and toilet, black lead.. 
Camphor, baskets, towels and shears 



Stationery. 

Subscriptions to papers . . 
Cutting padding pads. . . . 

Stationery account 

Queen's Printer's account 



Farm. 

Seeds, flower, garden and farm 

Manure 

Tools and repairs 

Implements (farm) 

Sulphur, rope and axle grease 

Flower pots 

1 pump 

Pigs ; 

1 team working oxen , 

D. McEachran, V. SL— 

Report on hog cholera 

M. W. Sine, V. S.— 

Attendance at piggery 

Willow baskets 

Plaster Paris and sulphuric acid 

Bags, ginger and Paris green. . . . 



Stables. 

Harness, repairing, and leather.. 

Trimmings for carriages, &c. 

Brushes, blacking and castor oil 

Rim spokes, iron and needles 

Whips, saddle gong and nails 

Blankets, liniment and common soap 
M. W. Sine, veterinary surgeon 



$ cts. 



10 IS 
7 15 



454 96 
103 25 



1,237 70 



10 80 
48 00 



58 80 



352 16 
57 50 
32 48 

100 00 
22 35 
44 80 
10 25 
20 61 

7 10 

8 05 
54 00 
15 22 
19 6tt 



744 12 



6 00 

1 80 

642 87 

175 34 



826 01 



98 03 

109 25 

55 61 

15 86 

16 60 
6 00 

10 00 
510 00 
125 00 

49 20 

53 00 

10 00 
5 00 

11 75 



1,075 30 



115 15 
11 29 
10 80 
21 64 
9 25 
16 73 
50 00 



234 86 



23 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 26. — Details of Expenditure of Kingston Penitentiary, &c. — Continued. 



Maintenance of Buildings. 

Iron, assorted 

Nozzles, flanges, elbows, cocks, &c 

Paints, varnish and black japan 

White lead, turpentine, boiled and raw 

oils 

Nails, steel and common wire 

Galvanized, lowmoor and sheet iron, 

sheet zinc, &c 

Drills, nuts, rivets and files 

Malleable and other castings 

Soil pipes and closets 

Rope, fire-clay, crucibles and hair 

plaster 

Car bolts, screws, pig lead, cowl and 

valves 

Brushes, lumber and block tin 

217 barrels cement 

Frank Gormley, account 

Garth & Co. do 

W. H. Howlan&Co. do 

E. R. Welch & Son do 

Dalton & Strange do 

James Vanader do 

J. Muckleston & Co. .do 

Edison Light Co. do 

Robert George do 

Miller Bros. do 

* 

Industries. 

Powder and fuse 

Machine and cast steel and iron 

Chain, shovels and files 

Rules, emery wheels and borax 

Rivets, nails and coal oil 

Lumber and hickory wood . / 



Prison Furnishing. 



Carpets, oil-cloth, mats and napkins 

Type- writer 

Flags, dusters, baskets, &c 

Crockery, knives and forks, measures 

and camel's hair 

Cloth brushes, blacking and black lead. 
Castile and toilet soap, sponges, &c. . . . 
Twine, shears, sheet zinc and whisks . . 

Copperas, Bcales, castors and rope 

Locks, tacks, wire, sponges, &c 

Snuff, trimmings, starch and blue 

Mending clocks, packing cases, &c . . . . 
Life belts and rubber 



Miscellaneous. 



Telegrams 

Postage .iinl stamps 
Freight charges. . . . 
E v i 'i ess do 

Advertising 

Telephone 

Magistrate's fee . . . . 



$ cts. 

601 78 
287 56 
262 92 

190 07 
227 03 



127 

51 

139 

152 



44 77 



143 
221 
237 

5,352 
730 
205 
610 

1,393 
264 
707 
593 
210 
174 



12,935 86 



112 
63 
32 
41 
15 
58 



323 79 



263 

100 

52 

25 
37 
12 
26 
48 
27 
36 
9 
21 



660 01 



27 
76 
52 
25 
159 
90 
12 



143 95 



Travelling Expenses 

M. Lavell, warden 

James Adams 

James Devlin 

Rev. C. E. Cartwright 

Neal P. Ward 



Hospital Department. 



Acetum cantharides, \ lb. 
Acid acetic, 1 lb ... 

do boracic, 1 oz 

do carbolic, 17 lbs 

do gallic, \ lb 

do hydrochloric, 2 lbs . . 

do nitric, 1 lb 

do salicylic, 1 lb. 12 oz . 

do sulphuric, 1 lb 

do sulph. arom. , 1 lb . . . 

do tannic, 1 lb 

do tartaric, ^ lb 

Amnion, carb. , 1 lb 

do mur., 4 lbs 



Antifebrin, 2 lbs. 8 oz 

Bals. Copaib. , i lb 

Beef, peptonoids, 3 doz 

Bismuth carb. , 2 lbs. 8 oz 

do tris. nit. , | lb 

Bovenine (small), \ doz 

do (large), 3J doz 

Bromidia, \\ lbs 

Calcischlor., 82 lbs 

Camphor, 2 lbs 

Carbo animalis, 6 lbs .... 

Celery eomp., 1 bot 

Cerii, oxalus, \ lb 

Chionia, h lb 

Chloroform (D. & F.), 1 lb. . . . 

Cinchona pulv. , 6 lbs 

Cincho quinine, 5 oz 

Creta praep. , 1 lb 

Cuticura soap, 1 

Emplast. belladonnae, 10| doz 

do canthar., 1 yd 

do capcine, 2 doz 

do dental, § doz 

Meades, 5 yds 

sinap. , 50 yds 

Emulsion cod liver oil, Miller' 

do do Scott's, 3 

do do Warn pole's, 2. . 

Extract belladonna, \ oz 

do ginger, Sanford's, \ doz 

do hammamelis, Pond's, 3 

do nucis vom. , \ oz 

Ferri per sulph., 13 oz 

do sulph. exsceiatta, \ lb 

do sulph. pulv., 36 lbs 

Fid. ext. cascara sagrada, 5h lbs 

do do P.L\&Co.,21bs 

do ergotse, 3 lbs 

do gent, co., 11 lbs 

( rum acaciae pulv., (>£ lbs 

do tragacanth. and pt., 1 oz 

( S-lycerine, 3 lbs 

Hyd. submur., \ lb 

Iodoform, 2 lb 

Lactopep'syn, 1 bot 

Lime juice, £ doz. 

Lin. farini, 200 lbs 

Liniment camph. co., 7 lbs 

do saponis, 5 lbs 

24 



do 
do 



11. 



Department of Justice. 

No. 26. — Details of Expenditure of Kingston Penitentiary, &c. — Concluded. 



Hospital Department — Continued. 



Liquor amnion, fort., 4 lbs. . . 

do potassse, 4 lbs 

Magnes. carb. , 1 lb 

do sulph. , 155 

Morphine sulph., £ oz 

Oil, cedar, 4 oz 

do morrhuae, 2^ galls 

do olivae opt., 8 lbs 

do ricini, 40 lbs 

Paris green, ^ lb 

Pil. aloin, 25 

do aloin co. , 500 

do aloin co. c. podoph, 1000. 

do atropine, 100 

do cath. co. imp. , 3 lbs 

do hydrarg, h lb 

do hyoscene, 100. 



do morph. , i gr. . 500 . 

do morph., | gr., 500 

do rhei co. , 100 

do salol, 200 

Plumb, acet, 1 lb 

Podophyllin, 1 oz 

Potass, bicarb, 9 lbs 

do bromide, 9 lbs 

do carb. , 5 lbs 

do chlor. pulv., 8 lbs 

do iodid., 1 lb 

do nitras pulv., 5 lbs 

Prescription, 73612 

do 73766 

Pulv. capsici, \ lb 

do ipecac, f lb 

do ipecac co. , 1^ lbs 

Pulv. opii, 2 oz 

do rhei, | lb 

do seidlitz, 10 doz 

Quinine sulph, 15 oz 

Resin alb. , 1 lb 

Sapo hisp., 6 lbs 

Sodae biboras, 1 lb 

do bicarb., 3 lbs. . .: 

do et pot. tart., 8 lbs 

Spts. ammon. arom., 47 lbs. 

do eth. nitras, 9 lbs 

do frumenti, 26| galls 

do methyl., h, gall 

do myrceae, 1 lb 

do terebinth, 4 lbs 

do vini gallici, 8 oz 

do do rect., 2-34-8 galls. . . 

Sulphur, 36 lbs " 

Syrup hypophos. hemat., 3 lbs, 

do scillae, 2 lbs 

do trifol. co. , 3 lbs 

do ferri iodid, 5 lbs 

Tincture aconite, 3 lbs 

do belladonnas, 5^ lbs. . . 
do cam ph. co., 39 lbs. . . . 

do canthar. , 6 oz 

do cardam. co., 1 lb 

do catechu, 35 lbs 

do cinchon. co., 2 lbs.. . . 

do digital. , 4 lbs 

do ferri mur. , 1 lb 

do gent, co., 4 lbs 

do hyoscyam., 10i lbs. . . 

do iodi., 3 lbs . 

do opii, 6 lbs 



$ cts. 

80 
60 
20 
3 10 
53 

40 

3 14 

1 56 

4 80 
15 

20 

1 50 

3 00 
40 

5 25 

50 

1 25 

2 00 
2 50 

50 

1 60 
15 

50, 

2 70 
5 40 

1 50 

2 00 

4 00 
50 
40 
30 
08 
2 63 
2 63 
90 
80 

2 60 

7 50 
05 
90 
20 

60 

3 20 
21 15 

4 50 
53 50 

1 25 
40 
32 

25 

8 54 

1 80 

2 50 

56 
2 75 
2 50 

1 35 

2 30 

12 48 
25 
35 

13 65 

90 

1 60 

20 

1 20 
4 20 

2 10 
4 20 



Hospital Department — Concluded 

Tincture scilhe, 3 lbs 

do tolu, ^ oz 

do valerian, 1 lb 

do zingiberis, 2 lbs 

Terebene, £ lb 

Ung. carbolic, 1 lb 

do fejri persulph, 1 lb 

do gallae co., 1 lb 

do iodi., 1 lb. 

do resinae, 1 lb 

do simplex, 2 T % lbs 

Vaseline, 15 lbs 

Vin. ipecac, 4 lbs . 



Appliances, Sundries, dx. 

Absorbent cotton, 1 lb. 14 oz . . . 

Atomizer bulb, 1 

Boxes, chip, 1 gross 

do ' folding pill, 1,000 

do paper pill nest, 1 doz 

Brush, sable, 1 

Bedpans, 3 

C. H. pencils, 1 doz 

Capsules, empty, 800 

Caustic holders, 2 

Caustic points, 2 , 

Corks, 17 gross 

Electro silicon, 2 

Eye shades, 6 . . . 

Feeding mugs, 3 

Fly paper, 1 doz 

do holders, 2 

Glass gallipots, 4-oz. ,11 

do 1-lb., 9 

Indelible ink, 1 bottle 

Insect powder, h lb 

Lint, 3 r Vlbs. 

Medicine glasses, 1-oz., 1 doz.. . 
do 2-oz., \ doz. . 

Mortar, wedgewood, 1 , 

Moth camphor, \ lb 

Paper cups, antiseptic, 15 

Reagent case, 1 

Repairs Semple's inhaler 

Silver wire, \ oz 

Soda mint, 1 

Spectacles, 3 

Splints, felt, adjustable 

Sponges, 18 

Syringes, eye, 3 

do glass, 3 

do I. R., 3 

Suppositories 

Suspensories, 1 doz 

Trusses, double, 2 

do single, 3 

Urinals, 8 

Vaccine points, 30 

Vials, 2-oz. , 6 doz 

do 4-oz. , 6 doz 

do 8-oz., 13 doz 

do 16-oz., 1 T 7 ^ doz 

do 32-oz., 2 doz 



Grand Total, 



$ cts. 



1 20 


33 


40 


90 


40 


30 


40 


90 


60 


40 


1 15 


3 00 


1 80 


413 53 


96 


50 


1 60 


2 50 


1 75 


40 


3 75 


25 


1 50 


2 10 


17 


6 05 


30 


75 


1 20 


50 


10 


1 10 


1 85 


20 


25 


2 80 


95 


50 


1 00 


25 


32 


2 75 


50 


25 


25 


3 50 


14 50 


2 10 


50 


45 


1 92 


25 


1 51 


3 00 


2 25 


5 40 


3 75 


1 25 


1 63 


4 60 


1 87 


25 


86 08 


139,385 51 



25 



56 Victoria. 



Dr. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 27. 
Balance Sheet, Kingston Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. Cr. 



Buildings, lands, &c 

Protestant chapel, library and school . 
Roman Catholic library and chapel. . . 

Engineer's department 

Storekeeper's department 

Chief trade instructor's department . . 

Sundries in yards and wharf 

Steward's department 

Tailor's department 

Shoe department 

Carpenter's department 

Blacksmith's department 

Mason's department 

Hospital and asylum 

Armoury 

Female prison 

Stables and farm 

Stonecutter's department 

Quarry and railroad 

Grist mill 

Office furniture 

North lodge 

West lodge 

Towers (furniture) 

Public Works Department, stores 

Electric light stock 

Bakery 

Outside labouring gang 



To Balance investment. 



$ cts. 



856,490 16 


3,007 57 


1,541 43 


67,473 00 


1,352 28 


5,288 65 


1,135 75 


24,482 91 


4,188 31 


1,320 54 


2,601 64 


1,311 96 


293 73 


2,647 32 


1,718 69 


1,554 45 


3.024 10 


2,829 51 


1,394 75 


3,198 36 


424 70 


124 31 


25 00 


87 45 


4,906 54 


13,923 41 


485 30 


175 05 


1,007,006 87 


1,007,006 87 



Balance . 



$ cts. 
1,007,006 87 






S. W. SCOBBLL, 



Accountant. 



26 



Department of Justice. 



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56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



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29 



INSPECTOR OF PENITENTIARIe' 
No. 29. 
op Convicts received iu the Kingston Penitentiary during the Year 1891-92. giving Civil State, 




Department of Justice. 

No. 30. 
Criminal Statistics, Kingston Penitentiary, for the Year ended 30th June, 182!). 



- 


Description. 


481 

11) 

6 

500 

341 

1G5 

506 

56 
240 
103 

60 

29 
18 

506 

400 
21 

85 

506 

75 

340 

91 

506 

64 

56 

33 

13 

263 

43 

1 

14 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

506 

2 

11 

1 

7 
1 


<» 

"eg 

a> 

26 

26 

4 

22 

26 

1 

. 8 
7 
4 
6 

26 

15 
2 

9 

26 

2 

9 

15 

26 

2 

2 
6 

1 
5 
4 

"2 
2 
2 

26 


O 

H 

507 

19 

6 

532 

345 

187 

532 

57 
248 
110 
64 
35 
18 

532 

415 
23 
94 

532 

77 
349 
106 

532 

66 

58 

39 

14 

268 

47 

1 

14 

1 

1 

4 

1 

3 

6 

3 

1 

1 

1 

3 

532 

2 

11 

1 

7 
1 


— 


Description. 


CD 

la 

2 


Is 

I 


"3 




Race 


White 


Occupation 


Bricklayers 

Blacksmiths 


3 
4 

1 
5 
3 
3 
1 
9 
1 

20 
7 
9 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

50 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
226 
1 
3 
1 
5 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

14 
1 
1 
1 

17 

10 
2 
1 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

18 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




3 




Coloured 


4 




Indian 

Single 


Boilermaker 


1 
5 




Brakemen 


8 




Broom-makers ... 


3 

1 


Marital 


Clerks 


f) 




Married .... 

• 

Under 20 years 


Confectioners. . . . 


1 




Carpenters 


90 




Cigarmakers 






Cooks 

Coopers. . . . 


9 

9 


Age 


Currier 


1 


20 to 30 do 


Cabinetmaker . . 


1 




30 to 40 do ... 


Doctor 


1 




40 to 50 do 


Engineers ... 


? 




50 to 60 do ... 


Express agent. . . 


1 




Over 00 do 


Electrician 


1 






Farmers 


50 




Firemen 


? 




Gardener 


1 




Groom 


1 


Education. . . 


Harnessmakers 


9 




Read only 


Hotelkeeper 


1 






Hatter 


1 








1 




Hostler 


1 




Jeweller . 


1 






296 


Moral habits 


Musician. . . '. 

Moulders 


1 




Temperate 


3 




Intemperate . . . 


Merchant 


1 




England 


Machinists 


5 




Millwright 


1 






6 




Optician 


1 


Where born. 


Post office clerk 


1 




United States 


Polisher 


1 




Ireland 


Piano finishers 


9 




Scotland 


Plumber 


1 




Ontario 


Painters 

Plasterer 


14 




Quebec 


1 




Finland 

Germany 


Quarryman 


1 




Roofer 


1 




India 

Spain 


Shoemakers 


17 




Sailors 


10 




Sweden 


Steamfitters , 


2 




Italy 

Nova Scotia 


Stereotyper 


1 




Surveyor 


1 




New Brunswick 


Stonecutters 


9 




P. E. Island 

Gibraltar 


Spinner 

Sawyer 


1 
1 




Austria 


Stoker 


1 




Wales 


School teacher 


1 




Denmark 

Ag'ents 


Steward 


1 




Safe maker 


1 




Tailors 

Traders 


18 

2 




Teamsters 


5 


Occupation . 




1 




Barbers 




1 




Bootblack 


Telegraph operator 

Theatrical manager 


1 




Bakers 

Bookbinder 


1 
1 






3: 


3 





56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

N 0# 30. — Criminal statistics, Kingston Penitentiary, &c. — Continued. 



Occupation. . 



Crimes. 



Description. 



Watchmaker.. . . 

Waiters 

Weaver 

Window dresser. 
Females 



Abortion. 
Attempt to kill. 



do shoot 

do rob 

do rape 

do at bodily harm.. 

do sodomy 

do burglary .... 

Aiding and abetting rape 

Assault 

Arson 

Burglary 

Bestiality 

Buggery 

Bigamy 

do and horse-stealing 

do and forgery 

Burglary and larceny .... 

Blackmail 

Cattle stealing 

Counterfeiting 

Carnally knowing girl of 

10 . 

Carrying explosives 

Embezzlement 

do and larceny 
Felonious wounding. . . . 

Felony 

Forgery 

do and uttering .... 

Fraud 

Grievous bodily harm . . . 

Horse-stealing 

House-breaking 

do and larceny. . . 

do and wounding 

Highway robbery 

Indecent assault 

Incest 

Larceny 



do 
d( 



do 
do 

do 
do 



and receiving. . . 

and injury to 
property 

and shooting. . . . 

and false pre- 
tense 

and wounding. . 

and sheep steal- 
ing 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

do accessory to 

Malicious injury to pro- 
perty. .... _ 

Obstructing railroad 

Offering counterfeit 
money 

Post office robbery. . . 



506 



21 i 



26 532 



10 



2 
4 

1 
1 

7 
3 
1 
2 
1 
11 
29 
72 
1 
6 
7 
1 
1 
8 
2 
1 
6 

3 
3 
2 

1 

7 

9 

12 

3 

1 

1 

30 

16 

27 

1 

14 

4 

3 

102 

6 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 
22 
15 

1 



1 

2 
34 



Crimes , 



County. 



Description. 



Perjury 

Pocketpicking 

Rape 

Receiving stolen goods . . 

Robbery 

do with violence., 
do and larceny .... 

Shooting with intent .... 
do do and 
robbery 

Sodomy 

Suffering girl under 10 to 
resort to his house to be 
carnally known 

Uttering forged paper . . . 



Algoma 

Alberta '. 

Brant 

Bruce 

British Columbia 

Carleton 

Colchester 

District of Nipissing. . . . 
do Parry Sound. 

Dorchester 

Duff ern 

Essex 

Elgin 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Gaspe 

Huron 

Halifax 

Haldimand 

Hastings 

Halton 

King's 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lincoln , 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington . . 

Lunenburg 

Lanark 

Middlesex 

Manitoba 

Montreal 

Muskoka 

Northumberl'd & Durham 

Norfolk 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Peterboro' 

Peel 

Prescott and Russell 

Perth 

Prince Edward Island. . . . 
Prince Edward County . . 

Quebec 

Renfrew 

Simcoe , 

Stormont, Dundas and 
Glengarry 



506 



10 



Department of Justice. 
No. 30. — Criminal Statistics, Kingston Penitentiary, &c. — Concluded. 



- 


Description. 


6 
H 

a 


'eg 

! 





— 


Description. 




a? 

■"eg 

a 


"3 


County .... 


St. John, N.B 




4 

"i 
'4 

26 

2 


4 

1 
7 
4 

17 
8 

23 

6 

1 

138 

532 

24 

1 
1 

1 


Sentence. 
Religion . . 


&if$ years 

7 do 

8 do 

9 do 

10 do . 


1 
48 
2 
4 
46 
6 
1 

19 
6 
7 


"4 


?, 


Terrebonne 


1 

7 
4 

17 
8 

22 

6 

1 

134 

506 

22 

1 
1 
1 


5?, 






9 




Victoria 


4 






46 






12 do 

13 do . . . 


6 






1 




Welland 


14 do 

15 do 


19 




Westmoreland 

York . . 


6 




20 do . 


7 






21 do . 






24 do . 


1 

1 

30 

506 

138 

182 

56 

89 

4 

1 

8 

21 

2 

2 

2 

1 

506 


"3 

26 

7 

12 
2 
4 

"i 

26 


1 




25 do . 


1 




Life 


33 




Church of England 

Catholic 






2*4* years 

2-sf^ do 


532 




2irf^ do 






2^V do 


145 




2& do . 


2 
4 
1 
13 
1 
132 


1 

"2 

1 
'"2 

"4 

i 


3 

4 

1 

15 

1 
138 

1 

1 
33 

2 

1 
105 

1 
18 

1 


194 




2i" do 


Presbyterian. . . . 


58 




2j do 


Methodist 


93 




2i do 

2| do 


Jews 


4 




Infidel 


1 




3 do 


Lutheran 


8 




3i do 


Baptist 


?? 




3| do 


1 

31 

2 

1 

101 

1 

17 

9 


Disciple 

Mennonite 

Salvation Army 


?, 




4 do . 


2 




H do 

4f do 

5 do 


?, 






1 










5i do 


53? 




6" do . 






6i do 















18—3 



35 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 18931 

No. 31. 
Distribution of Convicts in the Kingston Penitentiary on the 30th June, 1892. 



No. 



How employed. 



Carpenter shop 

Tinsmiths 

Painters 

Upholsterer 

Coopers 

Carpenters, outside gang 

Blacksmith and machine shop 
Engineers and pipe-fitters .... 

Stonecutters 

Mason gang, No. 1 

do 2 

Labouring gang 

Quarry 

Railroad gang 

Tailors 

Shoemakers 

Farm and gardens 

Hospital patients 

do orderlies 

Asylum patients 

do orderly 

Dining hall and kitchen 

Electric light room 

Protestant chapel 



No. of 
Men. 


No. 


24 


25 


7 


26 


4 


27 


1 


28 


2 


29 


9 


30 


26 


31 


14 


32 


64 i 


33 


21 


34 


13 


35 


18 


36 


26 


37 


2 


38 


33 


39 


18 


40 


28 


41 


9 


42 


5 


43 


27 


44 


1 


45 


20 




2 




1 





36 



How employed. 



Protestant library 

Catholic chapel 

Cells, wings and dome 

Mess room 

Wash house and bath room 

Dry room 

Bakery 

North lodge 

West do 

Store room 

Grist mill 

Stone breakers 

Bucket ground 

Stables 

Teamsters 

Yard cleaners 

Ash pile 

Wood gang 

Barber 

Storekeeper's office 

Females 

Total 



No. of 
Men 



532 



Department of Justice. 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL PENITENTIARY. 



No. 1. 



ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE WARDEN FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

30th JUNE, 1892. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report upon this penitentiary for 
the fiscal year 1891-92. 

There were confined on the 30th June, 1891, a total of 350 male prisoners. Since 
that time there have been received from common jails 138 males and 1 female. 
In the same period there were discharged by expiration of sentence, 104 males ; by 
pardon, 9 males ; died, 1 male ; transferred to Kingston Penitentiary, 1 female — 
making a total of 114 males and 1 female discharged or otherwise disposed of. 

The prison population at this date is 374 males, an increase of 24 men as com- 
pared with last year. 

I regret to say that there has been an increase of 9 over the previous year, in 
the number of those who come back here for a second, third and fourth time ; and 
I think it is high time to provide for the punishment of this class of habitual 
criminals. 

The conduct of the convicts has been generally good. Breaches of discipline 
have been chiefly confined to cranks and irreclaimable characters. 

The sanitary condition of the prison is very good. 

Work on the new boundary wall has been pushed on vigorously, and since the 
1st of July last, another section of 425 feet has been built, apart from the tower. 

Two water-sumps were constructed along the Masson road, below the warden's 
residence, to prevent the flooding of the road. 

Five hundred feet of nine-inch tile drain were laid on the farm along the 
St. Frangois road ; and the hill along that road was also lowered five feet. 

Fifteen acres of wire-fence were put up, and between five and six acres of land 
cleared of stones and boulders. 

Four thousand loads of rubbish were carted from behind the new bouudary wall 
to the creek below, to level the grouud on that part of the farm. 

Five hundred feet of pipe were laid from the government tenements, to supply 
water to the piggery. 

The lodge of the assistant engineer has been completed, and is now occupied. 

During the year a new shop was opened in connection with the carpenter's shop, 
where convicts are instructed in carriage making, upholstering, painting and coach- 
varnishing, by Mr. E. Leclair, whose appointment was secured by your favourable 
and considerate recommendation. 

This shop has already turned out several conveyances, such as a stone-wagon, 
an English buggy, also a sleigh, besides the repairing of several others. Apart from 
the teaching of new trades, this shop will ere long, be a source of revenue to the 
institution. 

Although over 100 convicts have been employed outside of the prison precincts, 
it affords me great pleasure to state that no escape took place. 

It would be to advantage to extend the artificial heating to the chapels, offices 
and all the other parts of the institution where fuel is used either in grates or stoves. 

I regret that the Public Works Department had this item struck off the esti- 
mates before submitting them to Parliament. 

37 
18— 3J 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

I beg to call your attention again to the fact that the barn and all of the gov- 
ernment tenements require to be tinned anew. This work and other heavj 7 repairs 
to buildings should have been done in the course of the past year, but had to be 
postponed for want of funds on the part of the Public Works Department. 

It will be necessary to provide for those urgent works next year. 

The total of revenue for year ended 30th June, 1892, amounts to $1,230.02, and 
the earnings of convicts for the past year amount to $55,031.50 ; being an increase 
of $1,824.75 over the previous year. 

The total expenditure for the year, including the material on hand on the 30th 
June, 1891, is $88,553.74 ; but by deducting from this amount the revenue deposited 
to the credit of the .Receiver-General, and the sums paid for items which should not 
be charged to the account of ordinary expenditure, the real expenditure for main 
tenance of convicts would be $81,390.94. 

The average number of convicts for the year was 353. 

The average cost per convict for maintenance proper is $230.56-£. 

The yearly cost of each convict after deducting the value of labour is $74.67J, or 
per diem 20-f- cents. 

I am pleased to say that the officers, as a whole, have been painstaking in the' 
discharge of their various duties, and are ever ready to assist me in maintaining the 
discipline of the prison. 

' In closing this report, I beg to offer you my sincere thanks for the kindness and 
assistance shown me in the discharge of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



TELESPHOKE OUIMET, 

Warden. 



J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



38 



Department of Justice. 

No. 2. 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL PENITENTIARY. 

Per capita Cost of Convicts for the Year 1891-92. 

Daily average, 353. 



Names. 



Salaries 

Gratuities 

Uniforms 

Rations 

Convict clothing 

Travelling allowance 

Discharge clothing 

Bedding 

Interments . 

Chapels 

Library 

Escapes 

Hospital 

Heating 

Light 

Repairs to buildings 

Maintenance of machinery 

Armoury 

Kitchen 

Stationery 

Farm 

Stables 

Telephones 

Telegrams 

Postage 

Freight 

Express 

Advertising 

Travelling expenses 

Transfer 

Stationery and Queen's 
Printer's Office 



By Refund of Expenditure 



Cash . 
Expenditure 

for 1891-92. 



44,216 

100 

3,137 

15,508 

7,734 

881 

1,347 

711 

23 

788 

175 

31 

615 

5,939 

1,137 

2,409 

88 

97 

418 

1 

760 

1,606 

5 

11 

55 

83 

27 

168 

217 

32 



cts. 

64 
00 

97 
<)7 
83 
00 
31 
43 
30 
75 
66 
90 
29 
71 
76 
80 
60 
22 
05 
00 
57 
21 
80 
32 
37 

59 
50 
36 
80 

95 



298 16 



5,631 92 

78 18 



85,553 74 



Deduct 
Material on 
hand out of 
Appropria- 
tion 
for 1891-92. 



$ cts . 



896 01 
1,935 77 
6,986 45 



483 79 
392 41 



209 97 

1,704 00 

476 46 

2,336 68 

41 00 

98 65 

318 03 



658 00 
179 50 



Net 
Expenditure 
for 1891-92. 



cts. 



2,241 96 
13,572 30 

748 38 



863 52 
319 02 



405 32 
4,235 71 

661 30 
73 12 
47 60 



100 02 



102 57 
1,426 71 



Add 

Stock on 

hand 

from 1891. 



cts. 



514 03 

2,500 62 
5,256 62 



260 35 
393 90 



177 26 

2,737 90 

460 92 

2,356 21 

12 00 

45 00 

310 38 



650 00 
35 50 



Actual Cost 

for 

1891-92. 



$ cts . 

44,216 64 

100 00 

2,755 99 

16,072 92 

6,005 00 

881 00 

1,123 87 

712 92 

23 30 

788 75 

175 66 

31 90 
582 58 

6,973 61 

1,122 22 

2,429 33 

59 60 

43 57 

410 40 

1 00 

752 57 

1,462 21 

5 80 

11 32 

55 37 

83 59 

27 50 

168 36 

217 80 

32 95 

298 16 



87,629 89 

78 18 



87,547 71 



Per 
Head. 



$ cts. 
124 41 



7 80i 
45 53| 
17 01 

2 49f 

3 184 
2 02 
06i 

2 23| 
49f 

09 

1 65 
19 75i 

3 18 
6 88 
163 

12} 

1 16| 
00£ 

2 13 

1*1 

01| 
031 
15f 
23f 
07| 
47| 
61| 
09i 

84| 



Amount of revenue $1,230 02 

Per capita cost $248 01 

Deduct for revenue 3 48| 

Actual cost $244 52f 



G. S. Mal^part, 

Accountant. 



TELESPHOKE OUIMET, 

Warden. 



39 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 



No. 3. 
EEPOET OF THE PEOTESTANT CHAPLAIN. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present to you my annual report for the year ended 
30th June, 1892, on which day there were 86 convicts under my charge, being an 
increase of 6 during the year. 

The figures stand thus: — 

Convicts remaining 30th June, 1891 80 

do received during the year 28 

Total 108 

Convicts discharged, 20 

do pardoned 2 

— 22 

86 
They are all from towns and cities, with the exception of 8 from rural parts, 
and those had been drifting through the villages. Amongst the foreign element 
(American and English) there is an increase of 8 over last year. 

Organ. 

I wish I could suitably express my thanks for the new pipe organ. It is a good, 
substantial instrument, and will be of material service in leading and sustaining the 
voices in the service. As to the men's conduct in the chapel, nothing could be more 
orderly, and although there is a want of interest in some, the responses and singing 
are made in a hearty manner. 

School. 

Thirteen Protestant convicts are at present attending school, studying both 
French and English, and are making satisfactory progress. 

Library. 

Out of the money appropriated I have been enabled to make a valuable addition 
of books of an educational character ; books ot reference, also biographical, historical 
and fiction, selected with the greatest care, in all amounting to 281 volumes, which 
is much appreciated. 

I did intend to again venture to recommend that work suited to each individual 
be provided to occupy all their time, and a small reward for extra work be given, 
but I find your admirable report for last year covers the whole ground of needed 
reform, which if carried out would be a benefit to the men and reduce to a minimum 
the dangerous element to society. 

1 have to acknowledge with thanks the assistance and support received from 
iho warden and deputy, and of other officials, for their willingness to render their 
aid whenever required, and I conclude by tendering you my best thanks for your 
uniform courtesy and the many favours I have received at your hands. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JAMES FULTON, M.A., 

Protestant Chaplain. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 

40 






Department of Justice. 



(Translation.} 

No. 4. 

EEPOET OF THE EOMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN. 

St. Yincent de Paul Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present my annual report for the year ended the 1st 
July, 1892. 

Since 30th June, 1891, the Eoman Catholic chapel of the St. Yincent de Paul 
Penitentiary received 110 convicts, 84 were released, 7 pardoned, 1 died, and has at 
present 288 members. 

Attention and good behaviour are maintained during religious services 

Cleanliness in our beautiful chapel is carefully observed by everybody. The 
singing is remarkably good and our organist is most certainly deserving of the 
increase of salary you mentioned in your last annual report. ' 

The greater number of the convicts partake of the sacraments of the Holy 
Church, many, very often ; and there is a notable progress in the discharge of 
religious duties. This is a fruit of the good example given by the officers and even 
by the prisoners. 

Bad example has caused the fall of most of our convicts. It is their love of 
riches and pleasure, obtained without working, that has led them astray. They wish 
to be rich and to enjoy pleasure. They cause injury, steal and even commit murder, 
if it is necessary, in order to reach their end, hoping they can escape human justice. 
As for the justice of God, it is little considered by those who are offered to them 
as examples of honesty, and these convicts only think ot it at the last hour of this 
life. 

This is particularly the case with the greater part of the foreigners coming from 
Europe or the United States. For these, self-interest supersedes authority, moral 
sense and honesty. Their sole object is to procure for themselves enjoyments and save 
appearances. Lost since their childhood in the darkness of sophistry, viewing the 
exhibition of bad morals, the glorification of criminals, habits of spend-thrifts of all 
conditions and ranks, pages of leading periodicals and novels, they seek in skill and 
boldness the means of accomplishing their shameful designs. 

To such people religious attendance preserves faith and sometimes restores the 
practice of religion. 

You are aware, Mr. Inspector, that the Eoman Catholic chapel has always been 
open for entering or leaving, and if we have tried to prevent the sad mockery of 
some easy chapel-changers, consciences have all the time been as free here as any- 
where else. 

Many thanks to you, Mr. Inspector, for the special grant of money which has 
enabled me to buy sufficient books to accommodate abundantly all our readers. 

Tbe school is still progressing. 

Allow me, Mr. Inspector, to thank you for your devoted cares in behalf of our 
difficult task, and to subcribe myself 

Most respectfully, yours, 

L. O. HAEEL, Priest, 

Roman Catholic Chaplain. 
J. G-. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



41 






56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 



No. 5. 
REPORT OF THE SURGEON. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 15th July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you my annual report for the year ended 
30th June last. 

The hygienic state of the penitentiary is very good. 

I am happy to inform you that this institution has not been visited by any 
epidemic or contagious disease during the past year. There has been only one death 
from among the convicts during the year, and this case was of old age and general 
debility. 

On the 30th of June there were two patients in hospital under treatment. The 
annexed list will show the number of patients treated in hospital and cells. 

Mr. O'Shea, the hospital overseer, continues to fulfil his duties to my entire 
satisfaction. 

I am thankful to the warden and the officers for the aid they render me in the 
discharge of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

M. H. E. GAUDET, M.D. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 






12 



Department of Justice. 

Annual Keturn of Sick treated in the Hospital and Cells of the St. Vincent do Paul 
Penitentiary during the year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Diseases. 



Acne 



Anteritis 

Amygdalitis 

Bronchitis 

Blepharitis 

Cardialgia 

Cystitis 

Chancre, venereal. . . . 

Catarrh, nasal 

Contusion 

Coryza 

Debility 

Diarrhoea 

Dyspepsia 

Dysentery 

Delirium tremens 

Epistaxis 

Erysipelas 

Gastric derangement. 

Epilepsy 

Eracture 

Gonorrhoea 

Gleet 

Heart disease 

Haemoptisis 

Hemorrhoids 

Lumbago 

Neuralgia 

Ophthalmia 

Orchites 

Otitis 

Plurodynia 

Phthisis (pulmonary). 

Prurigo 

Spermatorrhoea 

Stricture, urethral. . . 

Syphilis 

Scurvy 

Ulcers, syphilitic. . . . 
Rheumatism 



M. H. E. GAUDET, M.D., 

Surgeon. 



43 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 



No. 6. 
EEPORT OF THE SCHOOLMASTER 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to present to you my tenth report on the school and 
the Eoman Catholic Library, for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

Subjects of instruction : Spelling, reading, writing, orthography and arithmetic. 

The average attendance is 56 ; being, in consequence, an increase of 10 over the 
preceding year. These 56 scholars are distributed as follows : — 

Spelling, numeration, tables, blackboard writing 15 

Beading (elementary) simple rules, copybook writing 26 

Beading (analytical) compound rules, dictation 15 

Total 56 



I am pleased to state that almost all the convicts attending the school show, by 
their good conduct and attention, a desire to profit by all the means of instruction 
offered them, and by diligent study, both in the school and in their cells, endeavour 
to procure the advantages of education. 

The library is in a good and prosperous condition, and greatly appreciated. To 
the convicts who are able to read, it furnishes a continual source of intellectual 
enjoyment, and to the student proves a valuable auxiliary to the text-book. 

I owe my best thanks to the warden, as well as to the chaplains for their aid 
and kindness towards me in the discharge of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

J. T. DOEAIS, 

Teacher. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



44 



ne, 1892. 



1 






3 




o 




H 




. 287 




. 22 




. 15 




8 




7 




5 




5 




5 




3 




3 




3 


1 


2 


; 


2 


„ 


2 




2 


, 


2 


• 


1 


• 


. 374 




. 262 




36 




. 30 




. 14 




9 




8 




5 




2 




1 


m','.'. 


1 


!• • • 


1 


• • • 


1 




1 


p \ '.'.'. 


1 


p 


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1 


3 




NT ... 
> 


. 374 


i 




ST 5 ... 


2 


I > 


2 


t ! ! ! 


1 


Li... 


4 


^ 1 ... 


1 


5 ... 


5 


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2 


: '3 ... 


3 


6 ... 


6 


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f 1 


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3 


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5 


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5 



56 Vict- 



Si 

the Ec 

Si] 

Tl 

preced 



la 
their go 
offered 1 
to proci 

Tht 
the coin 
enjoyme 

I o^w 
and kind 



J. G. Mo 
Inspe 



Department of Justice. 

No. 8. 

Criminal Statistics, St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, for fear ended 30th June, 1892. 



Race 



Marital 



Age 



Education.. 



Moral habits 



Religion , 



Sentence . 



I description. 



White... 
Coloured 
Indian . . 



Married 

Single 

Under 20 years 
20 to 30 do 
30 to 40 do 
40 to 50 do 
50 to 60 do 
Over 60 do 



Cannot read . . . 

Read only 

Read and write 



Temperate . . 
Intemperate 



Roman Catholics. 
Protestants 



22 months 

2 years 

2 years and 25 lashes . 
2 do and 50 do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

9 do 

10 do 
12 do 

14 do 

15 do 

17 do 

18 do 
20 do 
25 do 
Life.. 



and 50 lashes, 
and 58 do 



and 3 days , 



367 
2 
5 

374 



128 
246 



374 



39 

179 
92 
42 
17 

5 



374 



86 
21 

267 



374 



168 
206 



374 



289 
85 

374 



374 



367 
2 



374 



128 
246 

374 



39 

17!) 

92 

42 

17 

5 



374 



86 

21 

267 

374 



168 
20(5 



374 



289 
85 

374 



District. 



De 



Bcnpl K hi. 



Montreal 

Quebec 

St. Francis . . . 

Richelieu 

Bedford 

Beauharnois 

Joliette 

Three Rivers. 

Iberville 

Rimouski 
St. Hyacinthe 
Arthabaska . . . 
Beauce 

< rasp^ 

Ottawa 

Terrebonne. . . . 
Montmagny . . 



Country. 



Occupation 



374 

47 



Quebec 

United States . . 

England 

Ireland 

France 

Ontario 

Scotland 

Newfoundland . 

Brittany 

Denmark 

Germany 

Hungary 

Italy 

Manitoba 

New Brunswick 
Sweden 



Advocates 

Agents 

Accountant .... 

Barbers. 

Bricklayer 

Bakers 

Bartenders .... 

Butchers 

Book-keepers . . 
Bridge-builder. . 

Bank-teller 

Brakeman 

Banker 

Blacksmiths . . . 

Carpenters 

Carters 

Clock-maker . . . 

Clerks 

Cabinet-makers . 

Collector 

Cooks 

Cooper 

Cigar dealer 

Confectioner . . . 

Coachman 

Cigar-makers . . 





aS 

§ 

e 

P4 




287 

22 

L5 

8 

7 
5 
5 
5 

:; 
:; 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 

374 

262 
36 

30 

14 

9 

8 
5 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

374 

2 
2 

1 
4 
1 
5 
2 
3 
6 
1 
• 1 
1 
1 
5 
11 
21 
1 
12 
3 
1 
5 
1 
1 

! 

•-> 


'.'.'. 





56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 8. — Criminal Statistics, St. Yincent de Paul Penitentiary &c. — Concluded. 



Occupation. 



Description. 



Cri 



Dyer 

Draughtsman . 
Detectives 

Druggist 

Engraver .... 
Electrician 
Farmers 



Firemen 

Grocer 

Gardeners 

Horsedealer 

Hatter 

Hostlers 

Hunter ... 

Jeweller 

Labourers 

Letter carrier. . . 

Masons 

Mail driver 

Medical student. 

Miners 

Merchant 

Marble-cutter . . . 

Machinists 

Moulders 

Nail-makers 
Nickel-plater. . . 

Plasterer 

Painters 

Printers 

Plumbers 

Pattern-maker . , 

Peddlers 

Roofer 

Statuary ........ 

Saddler 

Storeman 

Steamfitter 

Switchman 

Stonecutters 
Shoemakers .... 

Sailors 

Traders 

Tailors 

Tanners 

Travellers 

Trunk-maker . . 
Tinsmiths 



Larceny 

| Shop- breaking 

House-breaking 

Stealing from the person. 

Forgery 

Hoi s( -stealing 

Receiving stolen goods. . . 

( J ross indecency 

Burglary 

Manslaughter 

Wounding with intent. . . 

Robbery 

Rape 

Damaging property 

Wounding 

Arson 



1 
1 
2 
1 
I 
1 
11 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
121 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
9 
2 
4 
1 
1 
10 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
23 
5 
11 
13 
2 
3 
1 
3 



374 



1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
11 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
121 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
9 
2 
4 
1 
1 
10 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
23 
5 
11 
13 
2 
3 
1 
3 



374 



Crii 



Description. 



Stealing a post letter con- 
taining money 

Shooting with intent .... 

Neglecting to provide. . . . 

Larceny by a servant. . . . 

Having in their possession 
property stolen in an- 
other part of Canada . . 

Indecency 

Indecent assault 

Obtaining property by 
false pretenses 

Stealing money 

Illegal appropriation .... 

Bringing into Canada 
stolen property 

Shooting with intent to 
kill 

Stealing money out of a 
post letter 

Bigamy 

Assault 

Embezzlement 

Attempting to break into 
a shop 

Stealing in a church . . 

Attempt to commit i 

' larceny 

Altering an order for the 
payment of money 

Altering a post order .... 

Wounding with intent. . . 

Stealing from his master. 

Embezzling a post letter . 

Breaking into a counting- 
house 

Carnally knowing a girl 
under 14 years of age . . 

Assault with intent to 
murder 

Damaging a railway car 
riage 

Sacrilegious larceny 

Attempt to carnally know 
a girl under 12 years . 

Rape and larceny 

Forcibly taking away a 
girl with intent to car- 
nally know ....... 

Attempting to shoot with 
intent to kill 

False pretenses 

Assault with intent. 

Larceny in a dwelling- 
house 

Altering a Dominion note 

Larceny as a bailee. 

Assault with intent t 
rape 

Discharging a fire- 
with intent 

Obtaining money by false 
pretenses 

Larceny on board railway 
cars 

Aggravated assault. 



Is 


6 

S 
ft 


3 
3 
3 
3 




3 
3 
3 




3 
2 
2 




2 




2 




2 
2 
2 

2 




2 
1 




1 




1 
1 

1 
1 
1 




1 




1 




1 




1 

1 




1 

1 




1 




1 
1 
1 




1 
1 

1 
1 




1 




1 




1 
1 
1 




374 





48 



Department of Justice. 



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49 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 
No. 10. 



A. 1893 



Movement of Convicts at St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary from Midnight of the] 
30th June, 1891, until Midnight of the 30th June, 1892. 



Description. 



Remaining at midnight 30th June, 1891. 
Received since from common jails 



Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 

By pardon 

By death 

Transferred to Kingston Penitentiary. 



Remaining at midnight of 30th June, 1892 . 



Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


350 




350 
139 

104 
9 

1 
1 








138 










488 
\ 

114 


1 

1 


489 
115 


104 
9 
1 


"i 










374 




374 











No. 11. 

List of Convicts pardoned out of St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary during the Year 
ended 30th June, 1892, with Crime and Place where convicted. 



No. 



Name. 



Thomas Beliveau. . . 

Joseph Belec 

Jean Louis Charron 

Edward Slack 

Octave Meunier .... 
Joseph Berthiaume . 
Luther T. McGrath. 
Raymond Brule 

Hubert Collin 



Crime. 



Horse-stealing 

Larceny 

Stealing money out of a post letter 

Embezzlement 

Forgery 

Uttering a forged bank note 

Manslaughter 

Assault with intent to do some grievous 

bodily harm 

Opening a post letter bag and stealing a 

letter therefrom 



Where convicted. 



Arthabaska. 
Montreal. 
Terrebonne. 
Bedford. 
Quebec. 
Montreal, 
do 

Richelieu. 

Gaspe. 



No. 12. 

List of Convicts who have died in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary during the Year 
ended 30th June, 1892, with Crime and Place of conviction. 



No. 



Name. 



Narciaee Belinge, 



Crime. 



Larceny 



Place of conviction. 



Montreal. 



50 



Department of Justice. 

No. 13. 

List of Convicts recommitted in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary during the Year 
ended 30th June, 1892, with the number of recommitments. 



No. 


Name. 


a 

o 
K § 

a 

§ 9 


§ 

o 
OS 


I 

s 
11 


8 

0) .J 

« i 

gl 


No. 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 


Name. 


1, 

MS 

t s 


§ 

o 

!Z2 


i 

o 
H 


1. 

o s 


1 


Alphonse Portelance 






1 


"i* 


James Johnson 

William Robert 


i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 








9 


Joseph Gauthier 












3 


Victor Chaput 


1 

1 
1 






Joseph Favreau 








4 


Joseph Gagner 

George Verret 

Arsene Latendresse 

Napoleon Lamoureux 








Napoleon Labreche 








5 








Francois X. Beauvais 

Joseph Belec 








(i 


T 

l 

i 


1 












Frederic Legault 








8 


Joseph Larivee 




Alphonse Brazeau 


1 
"l 






q 










T. Brochu alias Therien .... 
Damase Larose 


i 






10 


Patrick Scanlan .... 


1 
1 
1 

1 








n 


William Gray 








Prime Collin 


i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

25 






1? 


Alfred Metayer.dit St. Onge 
Xavier Charest. . , 








Joseph Thibault 








13 








William Wilton 








14 


Joseph Poitras. . . 


i 






Edward Carmody 








15 


Joseph Wayland 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






Napoleon Giroux 








16 


J ean JLortie 


Paul Giroux 








17 


Damase Laf ramboise 

Paul Letore 








Totals 


7 


2 




18 








1 


19 


Louis Morier 

























No. 14. 



Summary of Punishments awarded in the St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for the 

Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



^Description of Punishment. 


No. 

812 
811 
254 
275 
95 


Description of Punishment. 


No. 


Deprived of light 


Deprived of library books 


4 


On hard bed 

In dark cells on bread and water . . 


Placed in dungeon on bread and water 

Deprived of school 


46 

8 


Reprimanded 


do tobacco 


12 


Lost remission 


To wear shackles , 


2 









51 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 15. 



A. 189S 



Return showing the remission of Sentence earned by Convicts discharged from the 
St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary during the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



No. 
of Men. 


Days. 


No. 
of Men. 


Days. 


No. 
of Men. 


Days. 


No. 
of Men. 


Days. 


1 





10 


96 


2 


177 


. 5 


355 




36 


1 


135 


3 


178 


2 


359 




78 


1 


160 


2 


179 


3 


363 




81 


2 


163 


14 


180 


4 


365 




84 


2 


165 


2 


245 


1 


449 




88 


1 


166 


1 


254 


1 


455 




90 


1 


170 


1 


258 


1 


524 


5 


91 


5 


174 


1 


264 


1 


625 


4 

7 


92 
94 


2 

5 


175 

176 


K 


270 
343 






1 


104 





No. 16. 

Statement showing the Employments of Convicts in the St. Vincent de Paul Peni- 
tentiary on the 30th June, 1892. 



How employed. 



Wood yard 

Carpenters 

Blacksmiths 

Stonecutters 

Masons 

Farm 

Teamsters 

Tinsmiths 

Tailors 

Shoemakers 

Bakers 

Yard 

Gate.'. .".'.'.' .'.' 

Steward's' department 

Engineer's do 

Warden's quarters and garden 

Deputy warden's quarters and garden. 



No. 
of Men. 



15 

26 

15 

75 

35 

23 

4 

8 

43 

22 

4 

•2 

1 

24 

3 

5 

2 



How employed. 



Deputy warden's and accountant's offices. 

Chapels 

Messenger 

Hall guard 

Hospital 

School and library 

Change room 

North wing 

West do 

East do 

South do 

Sick cells 

New-comers 

Punishment cells 

Excavation 

Total 



No. 
of Men. 



1 

2 
1 
6 

374 



52 



Department of Justice. 

No. 11. 

List of Officers in the St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary on the 30th June, 1892, 
giving Salary, Bank, Nationality, Religion, Age and Date of Appointment. 



Telesphore Ouimet 

Rev. L. O. Harel 

jfcev. .lames Fulton 

Thomas McCarthy 

M. H. E. Gaudet, M.D 

Geo. S. Malepart., 

Gordon B. Papineau 

Charles N. Contant. . . . 
George B. Lamarche. . . . 

( tetave Labelle 

N a] k >leon Charbonneau . 
Eugene Champagne .... 

Ephrem Trudeau 

David O'Shea 

-Joseph T. Dorais 

Edward Kenny 

Jean Vaudry 

Procope Dumas 

N. Beauparlant 

T. Nantel 

D. O'Borne 

G. Labelle 

B. A. Brissette 

C. Sigouin 

Eugene Leclair 

John Lynch 

James Blain 

.Joseph Demers 

Gilbert Chartrand 

Ubalde Chartrand 

James Carty 

Jean Bte. Lemay 

Edouard Prevost 

Aristide Rochon 

Charles Taillon 

Napoleon Plouffe 

Olivier Lamere 

Francois Plouffe 

Henri Boyer 

Antoine Plouffe 

George Nixon 

Felix Lesage 

Jean Bte. Malepart. . . . 

Vincent Bisson 

Alberic V. Pare 

Elzear Bertrand 

Samuel Filion 

Napoleon Bastien 

Godfroi Monette 

Pierre Breland 

Wm. Wright Gibson. . . 

Lewis Henry 

Martin Plouffe 

Isidore, Charlebois 

Theodore Chabot 

John D. Fitzgibbon 

George Charbonneau . . . 
Daniel J. McLellan. .. 

Hilaire Roger 

Felix Clermont 

George Shefritt 



38—4 



Salary. 



2,800 
1,200 
1,200 
1,500 
1,400 
1,100 
800 
820 
900 
1,000 
790 
780 
500 
530 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
700 
660 
660 
600 
500 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
590 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
50d 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
490 
490 
490 
430 
430 



Rank. 



Warden 

R. C. Chaplain. . 
Prot. do 

Deputy warden. 

Surgeon 

Accountant 

Warden's clerk.. 
Chief keeper 
Storekeeper .-.-.*. 
Clerk of works . . 

Steward 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer. . 
Hospital overs'r . 
Schoolmaster.. . . 

Farmer 

Instructor 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Messenger 

Keeper 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Guard 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

53 



Nationality. 



Canadian . 

do . 

do . 

do 

do . 

do . 

do 

do 

do 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

Irish 

Canadian . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

Irish 

do ..... 
Canadian . 

do . 

do . 
Irish .... 
Canadian . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

Irish 

Canadian . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

Irish 

Canadian . 

do 
Irish 



Religion. 



Catholic 

do 
Protestant 
Catholic . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 
Protestant 
Catholic 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Protestant 
Catholic . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 

do . 
Protestant 

do 
Catholic 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Protestant 



A g* 



Date of 

Appointment. 



31st January, 1887. 
27th April, 1887. 
1st October, 1889. 
31st January, 1887. 
31st January, 1887. 
1st June, 1882. 
1st January, 1886. 
25th June, 1887. 
1st March, 1880. 
1st Sept., 1888. 
30th June, 1888. 
1st February, 1890. 
1st July, 1890. 
24th January, 1890. 
24th July, 1882. 
1st January, 1876. 
20th May, 1873. 
20th May, 1873. 
15th April, 1877. 
10th March, 1887. 
22nd June, 1882. 
8th Sept., 1886. 
1st August, 1888. 
22nd May, 1889. 
1st March, 1892. 
1st March, 1887. 
20th May, 1873. 
1st January, 1878. 
1st March, 1887. 
1st April, 1887. 
1st March, 1888. 
30th June, 1888. . 
22nd May, 1889. 
22nd April, 1891. 
1st May, 1890. 
6th March, 1882. 
21st April, 1882. 
16th May, 1882. 
18th August, 1882. 
14th June, 1883. 
6th August, 1883. 
29th August, 1883. 
1st May, 1884. 
12th July, 1884. 
17th April, 1885. 
1st August, 1885. 
3rd August, 1885. 
19th May, 1886. 
25th May, 1886. 
8th July, 1886. 
6th August, 1886. 
4th Dec, 1886. 
5th March, 1887. 
4th May, 1887. 
2nd.June, 1887. 
25th June, 1887. 
30th June, 1888. 
16th August, 1888. 
1st January, 1889. 
19th July, 1889. 
30th Nov. 1889. 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 
No. 17. 



A. 1893 



List of Officers in the St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary on the 30th June, 1892, 
giving Salary, Eank, Nationality, &c. — Concluded. 



Name. 


Salary. 


Rank. 


Nationality. 


Religion. 


Age 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Alfred Nadon 


430 
430 
400 
430 

400 
400 
400 


Guard 


Canadian . . 

do .. 

do .. 

do .. 

Irish 

Canadian . . 

do .. 


Catholic ... . 


33 

28 
33 
29 
44 
48 
43 


13th January, 1890. 
1st February, 1890. 
22nd April, 1891. 
22nd April, 1890. 
1st March, 1892. 
4th Nov., 1881. 
9th Nov. 1881. 


do 


do 
do 
do 

.< do 
do 

. ' do 


... 




do 




do 




do 




Teamster 

do 

























54 



00 ^ 

i-H ?5 

6 H 



T3 
o 

a 



c 
"8 

'3 



3 

CD 
O 

a 



< 

z 

o 

o 
o 



O 



18-4J 



Department of Justice. 



. . . . so ...••>». . 

■ - . . U • • • ■ rl t- • ■ 

; 2 • ■% ■ a • ••S&V ■ 

.:-£ • • s'oxts • g A * $ 
• d ■ » 5 h cc-s >~>7"o ^ ^ 

■ » h fe i e5 g^ i^s 

§ 3 S'3.3.2J§.53,3 S'J a 
PQ 



3 2 



aoocooooooooo 

3 T5 *T2 '"C ^ '"O *~& '"C *"C *"C 'Xj Tj *"C 



i-' CN "* Cl ■* 
^ CO.OJ rti CO t- 



I 2 



S£ |S 



<~ o o o o 



.• HiONON 
S *-l i— ' i— I r- 1 



■* CO O 35 35 O N 



* * fc S >> 






-I 

P 

o 

« 

o 

en 

m 

m 



g 



55 






56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 19. 
Expenditure of St. Yincent de Paul Penitentiary, for Year ended 30th June, 1892 



Summary 

Salaries 

Gratuity, W. Holden 

Uniforms 

Rations 

Convict clothing 

Travelling allowance 

Discharge clothing 

Bedding ; . 

Interments 

Chapels 

Library 

Escapes 

Hospital 

Heating 

Light . .. 

Repairs to buildings 

Maintenance of machinery 

Armoury 

Kitchen 

Stationery and Queen's Printer 

Farm 

Stables 

Telephone 

Telegrams and postage , 

Freight and express 

Advertising 

Travelling expenses 

Transfers 

Less — Refunds 



Staff Salaries. 

Warden, T. Ouimet 

Deputy warden, T. McCarthy 

Roman Catholic chaplain, L. O. Harel. 

Protestant chaplain, J. Fulton 

Surgeon, M. H. E. Gaudet 

Accountant, G. S. Malepart 

Warden's clerk, G. B. Papineau 

Storekeeper, G. B. Lamarche 

Chief keeper, C. N. Contant 

Clerk of works, Oct. Labelle 

Steward, N. Charbonneau 

Engineer, E. Champagne 

Hospital overseer, D. O'Shea 

Trade instructors, at $700, 7 

do 660,2 

do 600, 1, 4 months 

Schoolmaster, J. T. Dorais 

Keepers, at $600, 6 

do 590,1 

do 500, 1 

Guards, at $500, 22 

do 500, 1, 8 months 

do 490, 3 

do 430, 5 

do 400, 1 

'In 400, 1, 4 months 

Messenger, at $500, 1 

Teamsters, at $400, 2 

Assistant engineer, at -$500, l 

Protestant chaplain's back pay. . . 



Uniforms. 



cts. 



Welt leather, 334 lbs. 
Calf, split, 160 lbs. .. 



44,216 

100 

3,137 

15,508 

7,734 

881 

1,347 

711 

23 

788 

175 

31 

615 

5,939 

1,137 

2,409 

88 

97 

418 

299 

- 760 

1,606 

5 

66 

111 

168 

217 

32 



88,631 92 


78 18 


88,553 74 


2,800 00 


1,500 00 


1,200 00 


1,200 00 


1,400 00 


1,100 00 


800 00 


900 00 


820 00 


1,000 00 


790 00 


780 00 


530 00 


4,900 00 


1,320 00 


200 00 


700 00 


3,600 00 


590 00 


500 00 


11,000 00 


333 28 


1,470 00 


2,150 00 


400 00 


133 36 


500 00 


800 00 


500 00 


300 00 


44,216 64 



Uniforms — Concluded. 

Blue sheepskin, 1 doz 

French calf, 167| lbs 

Lambskin, 21 skins 

Calf, kid, 2 skins 

Split leather, 104 lbs 

Moccasin, 64 lbs 

Varnish, 4 galls 

Carbone, 3 lbs 

Webbing, 11 pieces 

Twist, 83 spools 

Sewing silk, 1 lb 

Farmers satin, 886 yds . . 

Pocketing, 170i yds 

Braid, 144 yds 

Sleeve lining, 1,027^ yds 

Buttons, 40 gross 

Braid, dh gross. 

Blue serge, 1,054| yds 

Wrappers, 4 only 

Cambric, 322^ yds 

Wadding, 1,080 yds 

Jean, 494; yds 

Tweed lining, 90| yds 

Caps, 4 only 

Frieze, 226| yds 

Interlining, 414^ yds 

Brown holland, 101 yds 

Mitts, 65 pairs 

Thread, 7 1b 

Elastic, 10 yds 

Canvas, 252J yds 

Silesia, 334f yds 

Hooks and eyes, 13 gross 

Buckles, 12 gross 

Grey cotton, 564; yds 

Binding, 6 gross 

Helmets, 5f doz 

Hook eyelets, 1 box 

Peaks, 6 doz 

Barrel buttons, 3 doz 

Blue cloth, 30^yds 

Sweat bands, 6 doz 

Cap straps, 6 doz 



Mations. 



Beef, 77,094 lbs 

Mutton, 4, 048 lbs.... 

Butter, 1,567 lbs 

Herrings, 21 brls 

Tobacco, 2141 lbs.... 
Codfish, 1,420 lbs. . . . 

Sugar, 4,429 lbs 

Molasses, 938 galls . . . 

Milk, 173i galls 

Flour, 825 brls 

Vinegar, 179^ g alls • 

Pease, 58h bush 

Pork, 16,800 lbs .... 

Cloves, 15 lbs 

Malt, 3 brls 

Lard, 200 lbs 

Hops, 100 lbs 

Oatmeal, 3, 600 lbs... 

Pepper, 700 lbs 

Christmas extras 

Beans, 554; bush 

Rice, 2,000 lbs 

Potatoes, 255£ bags . . 
Tamarack, 30 cords. . 



$ cts. 

5 50 
218 08 
141 75 

7 00 
14 56 
21 12 

6 20 

2 55 

3 30 
69 40 

8 00 
372 12 

59 68 
100 80 
226 05 
114 90 

47 50 
681 12 

80 
61 23 
27 00 
10 84 

130 13 
18 00 

147 39 
41 46 

17 17 
99 13 
10 30 

5 00 
35 32 
97 93 

1 71 
3 60 
5 63 

3 90 
157 50 

1 50 

18 00 

4 50 
61 00 

4 50 

2 75 

3,137 97 



782 08 
303 63 
313 40 ! 
126 00 
027 68 

78 10 
194 84 
375 20 1 

38 76 j 
661 25 

44 95 

58 

512 

6 

25 

22 

60 
126 

66 

97 
110 

75 
127 
127 



56 



Department of Justice. 
No. 19. — Details of Expenditure for Year ended 30th June, 1802 — Continued. 



Regions— Concluded. 

alt, 11,400 lbs 

'.a, 21 1 W^ 

allow, 300 lbs 



Con victs' Clothing. 



Spanish leather, 4,021 lbs. 

Ipper leather, 200 lbs.. . 

luff leather, 140ft 

Sheepskin, 386 lbs 

'orpoise, 23 1 lbs 

[arness leather, lOOi lbs. 

rhread, 128 lbs 

Nails, 235 lbs 

.velets, 10 boxes 

[ tcks, 36 gross 

Needles, 534 papers 

Wax, 40 lbs 

Veatsfoot oil, 21 galls 

Burrs, lbs 

I bags 

|fnk, 10 galls 

Wis, S boxes 

Bristles, H lbs 

Wl handles 12h doz 

Hammers, 1 doz 

knives, 4 doz 

Lasts, 41 prs 

jxalic acid, 2 lbs 

'ramps, 6 prs , 

: Vdraganth gum, 1 lb 

Jompass, i doz 

Red calf, 150 lbs 

Hooks, 2 doz 

Thread, 28 gross 

Buttons, 138 gross 

irey cotton, 7493 yds 

Springs, 12 

Flannel, 2,498 yds 

Wrappers, 49 

Thimbles, 6 doz 

Chalk, 5 boxes 

Convict cloth, 7,415J yds. 

Moleskin, 1,039 yds 

Sponges, 4 doz 

Indelible ink, 36£ lbs 

Footed socks, 178 prs . . . 

Benzine, 1 gall 

New socks, 1,006 prs 

Bobbins, 12 

Lever, 1 . . . . 

Holland, 308| yds...' 

Silesia, 300 yds 

Scissors, 4 prs 

Canvas, 489g yds 

Tape, 5 gross 

Machine oil, 1 gall 

Tip leather, 109 lbs 

Camphor, 1 box 

Pins, 25 papers 

Heel shaves, 12 



Rasps, 2 doz, 
Emery straps, 1 doz . 
Sand stone, 1 doz .... 

Punch, 1 

Size stick, 1 

rapesca 

Whisks, Hi doz 

Pape measures, h doz. 
Shuttles and feeders. 

liinen, 107i yds 

Straw hats, 40 doz. .. 



$ cts . 

57 00 
53 50 
36 00 



15,508 07 



844 

(10 

18 

173 

40 

20 

80 

21 

3 

17 

10 

7 

27 



3 

5 

12 

12 

9 

5 

9 

12 



7 

1 

1 

112 

2 

162 

41 

73 



999 

9 



3 

3,549 

467 

12 

42 

35 

1 

352 





52 

68 

3 

67 

3 

3 

32 

1 



13 

6 

3 

1 

1 





2 

1 

7 

24 

36 



Convicts' Clothing — Concluded 
• lean, 17 U yds 

Buckles, 9 gross 

Rings, 1 doz 

Snaps, \ do/. 

Elastic,' 523 yds 

Take up block, 1 



Travelling Allowances. 

1 convict, at $ 5 

55 do 7 

43 do 8 

6 do 9 

4 do 10 

2 do 12 

1 do 14 

1 do 15 



Discharge Clothing 

8! ft. buff leather 

187 lbs. kip do 

7 boxes eyelets 

12 prs. lasts 

1,329£ yds. flannel 

15 doz. hats 

13 doz. ties 

10 gross buttons 

12 doz. handkerchiefs 

12 doz. braces 

150 yds. canvas 

8II5 yds. tweed 

5 lbs. wax 

4 doz. mitts 

3 yds. imitation lambskin . . . 

117 yds. cotton 

133 yds. farmer satin 

360 yds. wadding 



Bedding. 

100 prs. blankets 

1 wrappers 

1 doz. needles 

492 yds. denim 

120 yds. grey cotton 

1 doz. quilts 

42 doz. twine 

638i yds. gingham 

l,222i yds. crash linen . 
60i yds. sheeting 



Interments. 



40 lbs. tapers . 
Oil 



Chapels. 

42^ yds. communion cloth. 

Needle work 

1 pair candle sticks 

1 feather duster 

18 yds. carpet 



$ cts . 

53 37 
20 
95 

33 

41 H4 

IS 



■31 S3 



5 00 

385 <»(, 

344 00 

54 00 

4) 00 

24 00 

14 00 

15 00 



ssl 00 



10 56 

56 10 

3 00 

3 60 

398 78 

105 00 

22 75 

32 10 

10 80 
18 00 

21 00 
527 31 

3 25 
36 00 

22 50 

11 70 
55 86 

9 00 



1,347 31 



360 00 
2 00 
1 20 

83 64 
12 00 
18 00 
25 08 
51 08 
110 03 
48 40 



•11 43 



14 80 
8 50 



23 30 



21 25 

1 30 

2 00 

2 75 
14 10 



57 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (So. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 19. — Details of Expenditure for Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Continued. 



Chapels— Concluded 

17 yds. matting 

\ gall, mass wine 

1 ostensory 

Corona. 

Care of chapel 

1 organ 

14 doz. scapulars 

220 hosts... 

1 church register 

1 chalice gilt 

Organist's salary 



Library. 

Books, 299 vols 

Skiver, 5 skins 

Linen, 5 yds 

Bibles, 2 .•••.••• 

Newspaper subscriptions 



Escapes. 

Officer's expenses 

Hospital. 

Eggs, 39 doz 

White sugar, 70 lbs 

Medicines 

Canton flannel, 20 yds 

Biscuits, 1 box 

Apples, li bush 

Honey, 9^ lbs 

Alcohol, 1 gall 

Chicken, 1 

Linseed, 25 lbs 

Services of oculist 

Subscription, " Math. Brief 

Jug and basin . . 

Tumblers, h doz 

Spectacles, 2 doz 



Heating. 

Maple, 47 cords 

Birch, 50 cords 

Hard coal, 552^% ton s 
Soft coal, 288£fi$ tons. . 
Steam coal, 26 7 yV°cr tons. 

Casting, 80 lbs 

Grates, 3 

Mica, 40 sheets 

Wicks, 2 

Range repaired 



Light. 

Chimneys, 297 A doz. . . 

Lamps, 6 

Bowls, (i 

Collars, 30 doz 

Wicks, 63 reels 

Coal oil, 1,298^|, galls 

Burners, 64 doz 



Repairs to Buildings. 
1 1 panes glass 

515 11)8. ochre 

4« doz. pommade magique. . . . 



cts. 



12 



141 

20 

50 

400 

8 

1 

2 

10 

100 



788 75 



144 

7 

1 

5 

18 



175 66 



31 90 



7 
3 
531 
2 

1 
1 
3 

1 
53 
1 
1 

4 



615 29 



267 

292 

3,833 

1,367 

140 

5 

6 

8 



18 



5,939 71 



312 

1 

1 

17 

32 

720 

52 



1,137 76 



Repairs to Buildings — Continued. 



1 crucible 

1 tap 

7 gross brass buttons 

10 doz. brushes 

3 doz. carpenter pencils 

3 brls. horse-shoes 

Chains 

40§ yds. carpet 

2 sponges 

2 balls cord 

Saw-dust 

6 prs. wheel boxes 

6 boxes tin 

2,266 ft. lumber ! 

3,170 bolts and nuts 

2 prs. knobs 

10 quires emery cloth 

8 truck wheels 

1 brading machine 

404^ lbs. block tin 

3,236^ lbs. iron 

50 lbs. horse-shoe nails 

7 pads 

740 lbs. paint 

20 lbs. rivets 

2 lbs. sifting wire 

4 doz. eyelets 

h doz. whip sockets 

1 scale repaired 

Inspection weights and measures . 

5 boxes tar camphor 

10 doz. mirrors 

13 ft. cane 

65 galls, varnish and japan 

15 lbs. washers 

2 hammers 

20 lbs. root 

50 gross screws 

2 rat traps 

202 lbs. nails.... 

300 lbs. tallow 

1 drawing knife 

2 scrapers 

2,717 ft. basswood 

716 ft. birch 

799 ft. hickory 

10 lbs. bristles 

Carriage lamps 

Yl\ doz. files 

25 sheets mica 

49 quires sand-paper 

Carriage-maker's tools 

5 boxes Canada plate 

2 wheel plates 

15^ lbs. stove pipe wire 

1 sun blade 

362 lbs. steel 

220 ft. leather 

2| doz. shafts 

2 saws 

8 lbs. pumice stone 

4 axes 

4 sleigh ferrules 

1 set steel axes 

49£ galls, raw oil 

1 putty knife 

60 drain pipes 

3 handscrews 

290 lbs. hair 

1 paint crushing machine 

Paint spatula. 



51 yds. carriage cloth. 
36 yds. binding 



2 vices. 



58 



Department of Justice. 

No. 19. — Details of Expenditure for Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Continued. 



Repairs to Buildings — Concluded. 



9 paint brushes 

t» lbs. pipeclay 

15 H>s. fibre 

4 balls twine and cord 

8 prs. tips 

S21bs. hlling-up 

lyd. felt 

Ufl yds. green cloth 

1] gross lace 

t anti-rattlers 

Roof repaired 

216 H>s. chloride of lime. . 

3 brls. charcoal 

4 gross tacks 

1 pr. hinges 

1 pkge. copper thread. . . . 

Bevel square 

3!> ft. cowhide 

3 double-irons 

2 sheets pasteboard 

1 soldering stove 

240 prs. bucket ears 

2 btls. muriatic acid 

1 leather strap 

6 prs. pincers 

305 lbs. whiting 

120 lbs. springs 

2 prs. snips 

Spoke-shaves 

Rolling machine repaired. 

4 hooks 

2 ball-braces 

10 sets hubs and spokes. . . 
17 yds. duck 

5 lbs. casting 

724 ft. elm 

1 machine screw 

26 doz. birch brooms 

1 brl. Albany sand 

1 compass 

3 chisels 

8 castors 

220 lbs. glue 

373 lbs. borax 

1 mortising machine 

8 bits 

5 doz. drill bits 

260fg lbs. wire 

3 doz. locks 

1 folding machine 

15 lbs. tampico 

2 iron planes 



1 paper-cutter. 
2bei 



;nt poles. 

Hall paper 

27 lbs. rubber 

1 ball twist 

3 sets reins 

10 yds. muslin 

15 yds. rubber drill.. . . 

6 doz. buckles 

5 pieces malleable iron . 
Clock oil 



Maintenance of Machinery. 

Turpentine, 41| galls 

Tallow, 300 lbs". 

Oil, 6 galls 

Bath-brick, 1 doz 

Pommade magique, 12 doz 



$ cts. 

4 05 
60 

6 oo 
73 

3 30 

4 80 

92 
63 71 

7 60 

1 65 

7 82 
17 20 

3 00 

5 96 
25 
10 

90 

5 27 

1 95 

20 

6 25 
9 60 

5 00 

3 00 

1 20 

1 53 

8 16 

7 00 

2 55 

6 50 
1 70 

4 25 
30 00 

8 60 

40 

22 32 

1 50 
10 40 

2 50 
90 

3 25 

4 80 
37 50 
29 94 
46 00 

3 75 

4 80 
14 74 

6 25 
26 00 
3 75 
6 75 
50 00 
2 90 
8 00 

23 67 
25 

5 25 

2 50 
12 00 

3 80 
5 11 
25 



2,409 80 



24 90 

36 00 

8 50 

6 00 

13 20 

88 60 



Armoury 

Care of arms 

Revolver repaired 

Cartridges 



Kitchen. 

Black lead, 3 doz 

Soap, 3,087 lbs 

Brooms, 36 doz 

Concentrated lye, 48 doz 

Caustic, 775 lbs 

Whisks, \ doz 

Stone, blue, 8 lbs 

Combs, 17 doz 

Razors, h doz 

Towels, | doz 

Cups and saucers, 2 doz. 

Meat dishes, 2 

Pearline, 3 boxes 

Forks and knives, 36 doz 
Spoons, 12 doz 



Stationery and Queen's Printer. 

Packing cases . . . • 

Stationery Office 

Queen's Printer's Office 



Farm. 

Paris green, 162 lbs 

Forks, 74 doz 

Fork handles, 1 doz 

Scythe stones, 6 

Land plaster, 36 brls 

Cement, 3 brls 

Drain pipes, 200 

Mowing machines repaired, 3 

Fingers, 6 

Sections, 6 

Sundry articles 

Manure 

Fence wire, 950 lbs 

Cramps, 100 lbs 

Rake handles, \ doz 

Spades and shovels 

Lumber, 827 ft 

Feed, 2 tons 

Putz, 3£ doz 

Timothy, 5 bush 

Seed 

Buckwheat, 1 bag 

Pease, 6 bush 

Potatoes, 30 bags 

Hellebore, 2 lbs 

Rake repaired 



Stables. 



§ cts . 

49 92 

l 00 

46 30 

97 22 



6 00 
197 66 
90 00 
26 40 
31 00 

1 60 

1 90 
10 10 

3 50 

2 00 
2 40 
1 20 

18 00 

25 20 

1 20 

418 05 



1 00 
263 39 

34 77 



299 16 



59 



Bran, 8,020 lbs 

Straw, 4,877 bundles. 

Oats, 815£ bags 

Horses shod 

Salt, 203 lbs 

Sponges, 2 doz 

Saddles repaired, 10 . 

Felt, 2yds. 

Axle-tree repaired, 1 . 

Brushes, 1 doz 

Soft soap, 35 lbs 



32 40 


20 15 


1 80 


60 


18 20 


4 50 


186 82 


31 25 


2 10 


72 


4 75 


203 35 


46 25 


5 50 


60 


29 25 


13 39 


53 00 


1 30 


11 00 


58 14 


1 25 


6 00 


18 00 


80 


9 45 


760 57 


60 16 


146 31 


815 25 


51 14 


1 30 


17 70 


14 00 


10 00 


1 50 


9 00 


5 25 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 19. — Details of Expenditure for Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Concluded. 



Stables — Continued. 

Brass terrets, 3i doz 

Castile soap, 5^ lbs 

Tar paper, 6 yds 

Hay, 4,100 bundles 

Veterinary services and medicines 

Cart axles, 4 * 

Saddle, 1 

Small scale, 1 

Carriage wheels repaired, 2 

Collars repaired, 4 

Harness blacking, 1 doz 

Rubber boots, 1 pair 

Reins 

High wines, l T T g gall 

Bells, 1 doz 

Spring repaired 

Snap, 1 

Harness repaired 

Carpet, 3 yds 

Tar camphor 

Nitre 

Horses clipped, 2 

Hames, 4 pairs 

Scissors, 1 pair 

Lamps plated 

Whip sockets, 2 

Oil cakes, 75 lbs 

Whip, 1 

Cord, 3 packages 

Linseed, 30 lbs 



cts. 


4 45 


83 


24 


528 00 


46 18 


28 00 


4 00 


1 50 


1 50 


6 00 


2 00 


1 00 


90 


4 00 


2 25 


50 


35 


7 85 


3 30 ! 


45 


10 


1 50 


10 25 


1 00 


6 25 


80 


3 75 


1 50 


36 


1 4;< 



Stables — Concluded 

Traces, 1 pair 

Pommade magique, 1 doz . . . 
Interfering boots 

Miscellaneous. 

Telephone 

Telegrams 

Postage 

Freight 

Express 

Advertising 



Travelling Expenses 

J. Leblanc 

G. B. Lamarche 

E. Kenny 

G. S. Malepart 

Tel. Ouimet 

J. Cloutier .'. 

Thos. McCarthy 

T. Lesage 



Transfers. 

One convict to Kingston 

Grand Total. 



$ cts. 

70 

1 10 

2 50 



1,606 21 



5 80 
11 32 
55 37 
83 59 
27 50 
168 36 

351 94 



95 95 

47 25 
4 95 

48 75 
17 50 

1 20 

2 00 
20 

217 80 



32 95 

88,553 74 



G. S. Malepart, 

Accountant. 



TELESPHORE OUIMET, 

Warden. 



60 



Department of Justice. 



No. 20. 

tatement showing cost of Maintenance of the St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 
for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Expenditure for year ending 30th June, 1892, 
' June 1891 


including 


material on 


hand 30th 


$ cts. 


-s cts. 

87,147 71 

1,230 02 


Cr. 












881 00 

1,123 87 

32 95 

59 60 

2,429 33 

51,081 50 
3,950 00 


By Discharge allowance 


85,917 69 


do clothing 
























4,526 75 




81,390 94 








• 






55,031 50 
26,359 44 







Average number of convicts 353 

do cost per capita for maintenance $ 230 56, 

Yearly cost of each convict after deducting the value of labour. 72 6 

Or, per diem per convict 204 



TELESPHORE OUIMET, 

Warden. 



G. S. Mal£part 

Accountant. 



61 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 21. 
Dr. Balance Sheet, St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 30th June, 1891-92. Cr. 



To Buildings, land, &c 

Farm 

Tailors 

Shoe shop 

Brickyard 

Tinsmith 

Hospitals 

Carpenters 

Armoury 

Deputy warden's quarters 

Protestant chapel 

Storekeeper 

Book bindery 

Roman Catholic library . . 

School 

Blacksmiths 

Bakery 

Roman Catholic chapel . . 

Stables 

Warden's quarters 

Protestant library 

Engineer 

Steward 

Office furniture 

Stonecutters 

Balance 



769. 
1, 
4 



$ cts. 

725 00 
791 25 
608 28 
748 82 
853 00 
357 15 
212 71 
354 74 
860 25 
302 00 
184 15 
118 20 
35 53 
446 30 
258 70 
992 90 
815 73 
208 80 
172 00 
638 10 
323 75 
208 35 
801 82 
037 79 
962 68 



881,018 00 



881,018 00 



By Balance. 



$ cts. 
881,018 00 



881,018 00 



G. S. MalIspart, 

Accountant. 



TELESPHORE OUIMET, 

Warden. 



No. 22. 

Statement of Days' Work in each Department for 1891-92, St. Vincent de Paul 

Penitentiary. 



Departments. 


Days. 


Price . 


Amount . 


Stonecutters, masons and excavators 


21,103 
7,873 
6,932 

12,027 
l,722i 
4,258 - 

23,710 
1,209* 
304" 
4,863 
7,307 
8,664 
1,095 
1,095 


cts. 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 


% cts. 

10,551 50 
3,936 50 
3,466 00 
6,013 50 ! 

861 25 

2,129 00 

11,855 00 

604 75 

152 00 

2,431 50 

3,653 50 i 

4,332 00 

547 50 

547 50 


Carpenters 

Shoemakers 


Tailors 


Tinsmiths 


Blacksmiths 


Steward 


Bakery 


Engineer 


Stonebreakers, wood yard and jobbing 


Boundary wall 


Farm, garden and stables 


Hospital orderlies 


Chapels and libraries 






51,081 50 


TELESP1 
G. S. MalSpart, 

Accountant. 

62 


[ORE OU 


1ME1 
W 


irden. 



Department of Justice. 

No. 23. 

The Farm in account with the St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, for the Year 

1891-1892. 



Description. 



Dr. 

To Implements, seeds, tools and 

fencing 

0,530 days convict labour.. . . 
1,200 days horse labour 

1 keeper's salary 

2 guards' do 

1 farm instructor's salary . . . 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



500 00 



Amount. 



cts. 



700 57 
3,208 00 

600 00 

000 00 
1,000 00 

700 00 



6,928 57 



Description 



Ck. 

By 3,600 bush, potatoes 

600 do grain 

7<>(> do turnips 

300 do beets. 


$ cts. 

50 

(i 50 
40 
40 


250 do parsnips 

500 do carrots 


40 
40 


200 do tomatoes 


80 

1 00 


800 do mangold 

30 baskets cucumbers . . . 

1,400 heads cabbage 

5,000 stalks celery 


30 
00 
04 
04 


8,586 lbs. pork 

4,000 bdles. hay 


07 
08 


4,000 do straw 


04 


1,000 do leeks. . . 


08 


500 loads manure 












Balance 





lv.lt'-. 



Amount. 



L,800 00 
300 oo 
280 00 

120 00 
100 00 
200 00 
160 00 
180 00 
240 00 

18 00 
560 00 
200 00 
001 02 
320 00 
160 00 

80 00 

122 00 

200 00 

127 67 

1,159 88 

6,928 57 



Ed. Kenny, 

Farmer. 



TELESPHORE OUIMET, 

Warden. 
G-. S. MalSpart, 

Accountant. 



No. 24. 
Summary of Real Estate, St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, 30th June, 1891-1892. 



Penitentiary buildings, lands, &c 

Warden's house and premises ... 

Brick do do 

Water works, sewers and appurtenances 

Stone house and premises 

Prison walls and towers 

Bridge 

One terrace of 8 houses 

Brick sheds and watchman's boxes 

Two limekilns 

Tramway and rolling stock 

Drainage 

New wall 



$ cts. 

620,625 00 

12,000 00 

1,500 00 

10,500 00 

1,000 00 

7,500 00 

1,500 00 

10,000 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

19,000 00 

25,000 00 

60,000 00 

769,725 00 



G. S. Mal^part, 



Accountant. 



TELESPHORE OUIMET, 

Warden. 



63 



5G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. IS.) A. 1893 



DORCHESTER PENITENTIARY. 



No. 1. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WARDEN FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

30th JUNE, 1892. 

Dorchester Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report, with the necessary returns, 
of the Dorchester Penitentiary, for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

On the 30th June, 1891, there remained 169 convicts ; received since, 72 males 
and 4 females ; total 245. Discharged during the year, 69 males, and transferred to 
Kingston Penitentiary 4 females, total 73, which left remaining at midnight on 30th 
June, 1892, 172 prisoners, an increase of 3 over the previous year. The daily average 
for the year was 170, a decrease of 5 over last year. 

Our expenditure for the year was $43,464.94, leaving an unexpended balance 
of $147.44. 

The hay crop, on the marsh, was almost a total failure, necessitating the pur- 
chase of considerable quantity. The marsh has been failing for years aud from all 
the information I could gather I came to the conclusion that the marsh needed 
flooding by the tide. I secured the consent of all the owners of the marsh in the 
body in which ours is situated, to cut out the aboideaux and to make sufficient 
openings in the dyke, to admit the flow of the tide over the marsh. These openings 
were made in November and left open until the middle of June. Quite a deposit of 
mud was left on the marsh, from which I expect good results for a number of years; 
of course I do not expect very much hay this year. 

The spruce lumber required to make butter tubs had to be purchased last year 
instead of getting it off of our own "land as formerly — the supply having been 
exhausted. 

The large reservoir has been thoroughly overhauled and repaired, in the same 
manner as the small one was two years ago. 

The tailor and shoe shops have been enlarged and otherwise improved ; they 
are now all that is required. 

I have erected the new carriage house authorized by you on your last visit. 

The wash-house is being repaired by putting up a brick wall behind and around 
one side, a couple of feet higher than the tubs, the wooden walls having rotted down. 
The ceilings I sheathed with pine boards ; the steam from the hot water while 
washing continually destroyed the plaster and anew cement floor has been put down, 
the old one not having been constructed in a proper manner in the first place. 

The Minister having approved and authorized the building of a working kitchen 
and wood shed to all the houses occupied by the officers of the staff the same as the 
one I built last year and which met with your approbation, I will have them built 
as fast as I can, building a couple each year. 

I had a brush fence put around all our wilderness land and converted it into a 
pasture for our young cattle. I have a gang of prisoners at work clearing up that 
portion of it that will grow vegetables. 

The rust struck our potatoes in August, before they had time to mature and a 
large quantity of them rotted in the cellar during the winter, if this had not hap- 
pened we would have had sufficient for our use. 

We lost a very valuable brood-marc while in pasture on the marsh last summer. 

Robert Welsh a young lad 14 years old, who was serving a seven years' sen- 
tence, for manslaughter, died of consumption on the 11th January last. I learned 

64 






Department of Justice. 

that he had, the day before his death, expressed a wish that his body could be interred 
beside that of his mother, in Truro. I sent the body to Truro and telegraphed a 
friend there to carry out the poor boy's wish. 

The conduct of the prisoners has been very good. 

Guard Samuel Barnes was retired on account of continued ill-health. Teamster 
John McDougall was promoted to the position of guard and Thos. P. (lillespie was 
appointed teamster. 

I have very much pleasure in reporting that the services of the chaplains have 
been most satisfactory and I know that they are doing good work. While on this 
subject probably it would not be out of place if I were to put on record here, the 
opportunities that prisoners have in this prison for reformation. 

There are two chaplains, a Protestant and Roman Catholic. These gentlemen 
have, in addition to their Sunday services, Bible class once a week, religious instruction 
twice, and choir practice once. The sick are visited regularly by the chaplains. 
There are a general and two religious libraries. Magazines and other good and use- 
ful books are allowed to be received. There is school for an hour every week day, 
which is w T ell attended, to teach those who have not been fortunate enough to have 
had this privilege before coming here. Young boys and middle aged men have come 
here unable to read or write, who have gone away able to do both. Each prisoner 
has a lamp in his cell until 9.30 in the evening, this gives them ample time to 
study their lessons and do their reading. Their are eight trade instructors, and as 
many as can be are taught trades. As much care is taken in their moral and reli- 
gious training as is ordinarily exercised by a parent over his children. Altogether 
I think the opportunities here for reformation will compare favourably with those 
enjoyed in reformatories. 

We have had those who were reared in orphan homes, religious schools and 
reformatories, who were when they came here, which was only a few weeks after 
their discharge from those institutions, as bad as the generality of those that come 
here; therefore we must not be discouraged should some return for the second or 
third time. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN B. FORSTER, 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., Warden. 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



65 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



No. 2. 
DOECHESTEE PENITENTIAEY. 

Per capita Cost of Convicts for the Year ended 30th June. 1892. 

Daily average, 170. 



Salaries 

Retiring gratuity 

Uniforms 

Rations ..." 

Convict clothing 

Discharge clothing 

do allowances 

Bedding 

Interments 

Chapel 

Libraries 

Escapes 

Hospital 

Transfer of prisoners 

Heating 

Light 

Repairs to buildings. 

Maintenance of machinery. 

Kitchen 

Stationery .' 

Queen's Printer 

Farm and stables. 

Telegrams 

Postage 

Freight 

Express 

Advertising 

Interest 

Telephone 

Officer's quarters 

Office furnishings 

Travelling expenses 

Industries 



Cash 

Expenditure 

for 

1891-92. 



$ cts. 

,820 53 

617 96 

,104 05 

,895 28 

,840 67 

649 21 

516 00 

371 47 

.7 72 

155 15 

66 92 

35 88 

342 46 

250 75 

444 35 

314 72 

280 66 

464 29 

261 03 

100 81 

54 40 

,965 99 

15 27 

82 28 

244 94 

14 65 

68 79 

54 25 

20 00 

26 00 
63 90 

27 11 
,287 45 



43,464 94 



Deduct 
Stock on 

hand 
30th June. 

1892. 



$ cts. 



430 17 
406 14 
869 44 

107 82 



191 44 



69 15 



28 72 



1,896 92 



3,999 80 



Net Ex- 
penditure 

for 
1891-92. 



cts. 



673 88 

5,489 14 

971 23 

541 39 



180 03 



273 31 



286 00 



390 53 



,805 51 



Add Stock 

on hand, 

30th June, 

1891. 



$ cts. 



314 47 

1,148 96 

823 40 

42 46 



23 62 



106 70 



350 00 
24 23 



2,613 76 



5,447 60 



Actual Cost 

for 

1891-92. 



$ cts. 

24,820 53 

617 96 

988 35 

6,638 10 

1,794 63 

583 85 

516 00 

203 65 

7 72 

155 15 

66 92 

35 88 

380 01 

250 75 

794 35 

310 23 

280 66 

464 29 

261 03 

100 81 

54 40 

1,965 99 

15 27 

82 28 

244 94 

14 65 

68 79 

54 25 

20 00 

26 00 
63 90 

27 11 
3,004 29 



44,912 74 



Per capita 
Cost. 



$ cts. 
144 24| 

3 m 
5 8l| 
39 0Z 

10 5£ 
3 44^ 
3 01 
1 20 
04^ 
9l| 
39^ 
21 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 

32 

11 5f 


4£ 

1 44 
08| 


32 
12 
15 
37| I 
16 

17 67^ 



262 44 



Amount of revenue year ended 30th June, 1892 $ 2,836 55 

Per capita cost $ 264 19 

Deduct for revenue 16 69 

Actual cost per capita $ 247 50 



JOHN B. FOESTEE, 

Warden. 



John A. Gray, 

Accountant. 



66 



Department of Justice. 



No. 3. 
EEPOET OF THtf PEOTESTANT CHAPLAIN. 

Dorchester Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report, as Protestant chaplain of the 
Dorchester Penitentiary, for the year ending with the 30th June, 1892. 

On that day there were 126 convicts, as against 117 on the corresponding day of 
1891, and as against 119 on 30th June, 1890. I regret to add that statement shows 
an increase of 5 percent upon any preceding year. 

We have only the oft told tale of "the daily round, the trivial task," with few 
circumstances of an unusual character, to diiferentiate one day or one year from 
another. And yet, it is of the first moment that the ever recurring public services, 
sermons, and addresses and private monitions shall retain spirit and freshness to give 
them point and effect. 

The voluntary attention, apart from the compulsory attendance, of the prisoners 
during Divine service, as I have, in substance at least, said more than once before, 
leaves little to be desired on that particular ; whilst anything like an actual breach 
of decorum is entirely unknown. 

I am not quite as well satisfied with the musical part of the service as I would 
like to be, seeing we have frequent choir practice ; but the dissatisfaction I feel, 
arises out of the frequently recurring removal of outgoing men who have been partly 
trained, and whose places are filled by untrained prisoners. But, all said and done, 
with such material as we have, we do the best that we can. 

1 am glad to be able to say, that to refer to the General Library is the same 
thing as to say that it is as satisfactory to my brother Chaplain as to myself ; and 
that under Mr. Gray's management it is in better and smoother working condition 
than it has ever been. 

The same kind of statement must be made in any reference to the day school, 
the showing of which is very good. The average attendance has shown since Mr, 
Gray took charge of the school in 1889, a steady increase. In that year the average 
attendance was 39*25 ; whereas, for the year just closed, it was 52*9. The school 
discipline is perfect ; the pupils show much genuine interest in their work, and a 
real desire to learn, from which, to some extent, may fairly be inferred some desire 
to reform. 

The appointment of a Eoyal Commission on the liquor traffic prompted me to 
ascertain from the data at my command, the proportion of convicts who refer to 
liquor as the cause of their crime. I found the proportion to be a slight fraction 
over 41 per cent. This is lower than is generally or popularly supposed ; but, even 
with this proportion, we find that outgoing men frequently change that statement, 
and assign some other cause. 

One convict under my charge died during the year. Some time before he died, 
having professed repentance toward God, and faith towards our Lord Jesus Christ, 
I baptized him ; and, afterwards, at his own earnest desire, I administered the Holy 
Communion to him, to his great comfort. 

I continue to be debtor to all the officers, from the w T arden down, for uniform 
courtesy, and readiness to help me whenever I require assistance. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. EOY CAMPBELL, " 

Protestant Chaplain. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 

67 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 18931 



No. 4. 
EEPOET OF THE KOMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN. 

Dorchester Penitentiary, 1st September, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you my annual report for the year endedji 
30th June, 1892, on which date I had 52 convicts inscribed on my register as against! 
51 last year. Out of that number, 13 are preparing for their first communion; 5 
have not yet been baptized but are under a course of instruction. During the year! 
5 have been admitted for the first time to the sacrament of Holy Eucharist and 2 to! 
baptism. The catechism class is weekly attended by 29, six of them unable to read.! 
I had to set apart an hour during the week to teach them. These figures show that]: 
the great majority of convicts are in a great need of religious instruction, the absence! 
of which in most cases has led them here. When the amount of good to be done is] 
so great, and, at the same time, the conditions are so favourable, it is not surprising 
that a pastor of souls should express his satisfaction and the consolation he feels in] 
ministering to such needs. In my last report I gave expression to this sentiment, 
and I herein repeat it. The longer I remain in this field of labour the fonder I feelj 
of my work and of the men under my charge. Of course it would be too much of a] 
gratification could I state that they all reform or all work in that direction ; but it 
is yet very pleasant to know that some do. Others amend to a certain extent, a] 
very effective step to a fuller conversion ; whilst a few remain obdurate to the voice 
of God and rebellious to his divine grace. In the course of the past year I heard 
from four or five convicts, who wrote to me after their discharge from penitentiary, 
that they had secured work, kept away from bad company, adopted good steady 
habits and felt happy. They moreover expressed their gratitude to those who had| 
been instrumental in directing their steps on the right path. 

In the chapel, at catechism classes, in whatever occasion or place I have to meet] 
the convicts, I must in justice say that, to a man, their behaviour is most commend- 
able. Their attention and general demeanour during mass and public instructions ia| 
praiseworthy, being rather filial than servile. 

The choir, I am pleased to say, is growing more and more efficient and renders! 
every Sunday the different chants of divine service in a manner at once admirable 
and edifying. This is not surprising as organist and singers are indefatigable i] 
their efforts to ensure this result by long and attentive rehearsals. Here I cannot refrain | 
from paying you, Mr. Inspector, my tribute of thanks for your efforts, reiterated ii 
your report of last year, to press strongly the just claims of the different organists] 
to an increase of salary. 

The libraries continue to be well conducted and books distributed regularly. II 
was given to understand that the warden is to apply for a special grant to furnish! 
the general library with some of the books selected conjointly by himself and! 
chaplains ; and it will be, I feel certain, a necessary and profitable expenditure, 
add yearly a few volumes to the Catholic library. 

In conclusion we must all be thankful to you, Mr. Inspector, for your untiring 
zeal in devising judicious ways to reform the criminal classes, as your last year's! 
report is an ample proof. I was very favourably impressed with some of the sug- 
gestions therein, which being put into effect would certainly accomplish the object! 
in view. Neither can I pass over in silence what you yourself call a very goodi 
suggestion in the report of the Protestant chaplain of Kingston when he says: 
"That every convict should be paid what his work is actually worth; that the! 
expenses of the institution should be charged against this at a just per capita rate. 
This ought to give every man a personal interest in preventing waste, either of foodj 
or material ; that every wife, child, mother or other person dependent on any con- 
vict should have a lien on the surplus earnings of that convict remaining after sucl 
deduction of expenses, amount of lien to be determined by circumstances in eacl 
case ; that any further surplus should be divided equally between the Government 

68 



Department of Justice. 



uhI the convict himself. From such an arrangement I would hope for several 
lesirable results." Morally speaking I would venture to say that this plan, if put 
nto execution, would have a most salutary influence over most convicts. 

The uniform civility and gentlemanly demeanour of all the officials towards me 
[ cannot ignore, and to mention it here is to show my high appreciation thereof. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



A. D. CORMIER, Priest, 

Roman Catholic Chaplain. 



No. 5. 



REPORT OF THE SURGEON. 

Dorchester Penitentiary, 30th September, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

The state of the institution is in the same good condition that has always pre- 
vailed since it was opened twelve years ago; cleanliness, good ventilation and a pro- 
3er temperature being its most marked characteristics. 

The enlargement of the shoemaker's and tailor's shops is a most satisfactory 
mprovement as regards health, and affords better facilities for good work ; there 
>eing plenty of room and good light. 

The water supply continues abundant, affording a full quantity for every desir- 
ible purpose in the prison as well as supplying the officers' cottages. 

The men have been employed largely this season in farming operations and other 
>utside work which tends to keep them in good health. My experience has been 
,hat there is nothing that is so conducive to health and contentment amongst 
Drisoners as moderate systematic daily employment for all ; just and fair treatment to 
he industrious and prompt discipline to the negligent. The lazy man is invariably 
he one who complains most, and idleness tends to deprave even a good man. 

The number of prisoners admitted this year has been larger than in any pre- 
vious one — 72 males and 4 females. The physical condition was not as good as last 
rear's admissions ; 9 lads came here at the age of 16, or under ; 7 between 40 and 
10, and 2 over 60. We concluded our year's admissions by the reception of 2 dimi- 
mtive Micmac Indians, aged respectively 10 and 11 years. A considerable number 
)f those were suffering from syphilitic or kindred diseases on admission. 

The general and physical condition of the convicts throughout the year has been 
atisfactory. The number sent to hospital was 23 ; there was one death from con- 
sumption. The number of applications for advice and treatment was 2,874. There 
s included in the above applications, a considerable number of convicts who were 
luffering from slight ailments, but were not so ill as to justify me in placing them 
n hospital; and yet requiring medical treatment. We have not been visited by any 
contagious disease and there have been no serious accidents. 

Annexed are the tables showing the cases treated in the cells and hospital. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



r . Gr. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



ROBERT MITCHELL, M.D., 

Surgeon. 



69 



18—5 



56 Victoria. 
Cases treated in the 


Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

Cells of the Dorchester Penitentiary daring 
30th June, 1892. 


the Y 


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Cases treated in tl 


ie Hospita 


ROBERT MITCHELL, 

Surgeon. 

of the Dorchester Penitentiary for the Year endejJ 
30th June, 1892. 


- 


Disease 


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I. 



Department of Justice. 



No. b". 
RH5PORT OF THE SCHOOLMASTER. 

Dorchester Penitentiary, 30th September, 1892. 

Sir. — I beg leave to submit my report as schoolmaster for the year ended 30th 
June, 1892. 

The daily average attendance during the year was 52*9, as compared with 52-08 
for the year preceding, being an increase for the year just closed of # 82; and this 
notwithstanding the fact that the prison population of the latter year was 5 less 
than for 1890-91. Were it not that so many men are employed during the summer 
months on the farm and in winter gathering fuel, lumbering, &c, at such a distance 
from the prison as to prevent them coming to the school, the attendance would be 
somewhat larger than it really is. 

Very considerable progress has been made by the large majority of those attend- 
ing, and it is most encouraging to find many who, on first coming knew nothing 
more than the alphabet, able, after a few months' attendance, to read, write, and 
figure with a good deal of proficiency. 

The conduct of those attending was — with very few exceptions — excellent, and 
on only two occasions during the year was I obliged to dismiss a pupil for mis- 
behaviour. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN A. GRAY, 

Schoolmaster. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 






71 

18— 5* 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



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56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



No. 8. 

Statement of the Movements of Convicts at the Dorchester Penitentiary during 
the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Remaining at 12 p.m., 30th June, 1891. 
Received since — 
From common jails -. 



Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 

Pardon 

Death 

Escape 

Sent to Kingston penitentiary 



Remaining at 12 p.m., 30th June, 1892. 



Male. 



109 

72 



Female. 



Total. 



169 



70 



Male. 



241 



54 i 
18 j 

l\ 
4 ! 



Female. 



(ill 



172 



Total. 



245 



73 



172 



74 



Department of Justice, 





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75 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 
No. 10. 



A. 1893 



Eeturn of Convicts who were pardoned out of the Dorchester Penitentiary during 

the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Name. 


Crime. 


Where convicted. 




Larceny 

do * 


St. John, N.B. 




do 


Geo. M. Lee 


Wounding to prevent arrest 

do do 

Forgery 


Frederictou, N.B. 


Newton Lee 


do 




Halifax, N.S. 




St. John, N.B. 




Larceny 


Halifax, N.S. 




do 


Robert Davis 


Wounding 


St. John, N.B. 






Truro, N.S. 




do ... 


do 


Arthur Armondale 


Shooting with intent to kill 

Bigamy 


Annapolis, N.S. 
Amherst, N.^. 


W. H. Crossman 







No. 11. 

List of Convicts who have Died in the Dorchester Penitentiary during the Year 

ended 30th June, 1892. 



Name. 


Crime. 


Where convicted. 


Robert Welsh 


Manslaughter 


Truro, N.S. 







No. 12. 

List of Convicts who were recommitted to the Dorchester Penitentiary during 

the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Name. 


Recommitment. 




Alexander Conners 




First recommitment. 

do 

do 

do 
Second recommitment. 
First do 
do do 




Thomas Davidson 




John McKenna 




Henry Await 




Charh-s Stew ait 




• I<h.'|,|i Harris 




Henrj Brown 











76 



Department of Justice. 

No. 13. 

Criminal Statistics of prisoners remaining in the Dorchester Penitentiary on the 

30th June, 1892. 



Sentence.. . . 



Nationality. 



Description. 



Larceny 

Burglary and larceny 

Assault and robbery 

Shooting with intent 

Attempted rape 

Manslaughter 

Forgery 

Rape 

Burglary 

Arson 

Obstructing railway 

Murder 

Buggery 

Assault 

Receiving stolen goods 

Attempt to murder 

Sending threatening letter. . 

House-breaking 

Robbery 

Horse- stealing 

Bigamy . 

Procuring abortion 

Fraud 

Malicious injury to property 



2 years 
24 do 
2h do 
2j& do 

3 do 
3J do 

4 do 

5 do 

6 do 

7 do 

8 do 

9 do 

10 do 

11 do 

12 do 

14 do 

15 do 

16 do 
20 do 
25 do 
28 do 
Life 



White 

Coloured . . . . 

Canadian 

English 

Irish 



172 



172 



154 

18 



172 



137 



Nationality 



Age. 



Religion . . . 



Occupation 



77 



Description. 



Scotch 

United States. 
Newfoundland 
West Indies. . 

France 

Germany 



Under 15 years 

15 to 20 do 

20 to 30 do 

30 to 40 do 

40 to 50 do 

50 to GO do 

60 to 70 do 

Over 70 do 



Roman Catholic. . . 
Church, of England 

Baptist 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Protestant. J 

Congregationalist . . 



Labourers . . 

Sailors 

Barbers 

Shoemakers . 
Stonecutters 

Clerks 

Plasterers . . , 
Carpenters . . 
Butchers 

Soldiers 

Millwright . 

Stoker 

Blacksmith . 
Plumber 
Machinist. . 

Dyer 

Teacher .... 

Cook.. 

Druggist 

Painter 

Weaver 

Baker 

Steamfitter . 
Shipwright 



172 



172 



172 



125 
8 
5 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 13.— Criminal Statistics of prisoners in Dorchester Penitentiary, &c. — Conclud. 



Description. 



Civil Condi 
tion 



Province. 
Nova Scotia. 



New Bruns- 
wick 



Married . . . . ' 

Single 

Widowers 

County 

Halifax 

Cumberland 

Colchester 

Queen's 

Pictou 

Inverness 

Hants 

Annapolis 

Cape Breton 

Lunenburg 

Antigonish 

Digby 

King's 

Guysboro' 

Westmoreland 

St. John 



35 

131 

6 

172 



109 



Description. 



Province. 

New Bruns- 
wick 



P. E. Island, 



Total by Pro- 



Co unty 

Albert 

Charlotte 

Madawaska 

Northumberland. . 

King's 

Victoria 

Carleton 

Restigouche 

York 

Kent 

Queen's. 

Prince 

King's 

Nova Scotia. 

New Brunswick.. . . 
P. E. Island... 



49 



14 



109 
49 
14 



172 



78 



Department of Justice. 

No. 14. 

Return showing Punishments awarded in the Dorchester Penitentiary during the 

Year ended 30th June, 1892. 









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> 


3 






Q 


PQ 


b 


1 


Cl, 


K 


t 


| 






a 


d 
o 


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73 


CD 


CD 


■n 


CD 

13 


i 






6 


d 


d 


d 


Q 


d 


d 


d 






£ 


fe 


£ 


fc 


£ 


£ 


ft 


ft 




1891. 


















July 




3 


3 




2 


1 


4 


2 


3 




1 


1 


1 






1 




4 


September 


6 


I) 




6 


2 


4 


2 


3 


October 


2 

6 

7 


2 

6 

7 


"i" 


1 
1 
4 


"i" 

i 


1 

1 
3 


"'i' 


2 


November 


1 


December 


2 




1892. 




January 




2 

6 


2 
G 


1 


1 
4 


" 2* 


1 
3 


i 


4 


February 


3 


March 


8 
3 


8 
3 




1 
1 




1 
1 


"i" 


1 


April 


2 


May 


3 


3 




2 


1 






3 


June 


10 


10 


1 


4 


2 


3 


i 


1 










57 


57 


4 


27 


10 


23 


8 


29 



No. 15. 

Return showing Remission Time earned during the Year by Convicts remaining in 
the Dorchester Penitentiary on 30th June, 1892. 



No. 




Days . 


No. 




Days. 






33 


Convicts earned 

do 

do 


120 
119 
118 
117 
116 
115 
113 
110 
107 
105 
90 
85 


4 
7 

16 
4 
9 
4 
• 4 
3 

13 
7 
9 
6 




84 


1 


do 


82 


3 


do ' 

do 


80 


1 


do 

do 


79 


5 


do 


75 


1 


do 


do 


74 


3 


do 


do 


70 


6 


do 

do 


do 


G9 


1 


do 


G5 


2 


do 


do 

do 


60 


21 


do 

do 


30 


9 


do 


15 











19 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 
No. 16. 



A. 1893 



.Return showing employment of convicts in the Dorchester Penitentiary as on 30th 

June, 1892. 



How employed. 



Carpenter shop 

Blacksmith shop 

Shoe shop.. 

Tailor shop 

Machine shop 

Pail making 

Saw-mill 

Bakery 

Stables and teamsters 
Farm. 



No. 



How employed. 



Building dyke . . . 
Working in yard. 

Prison work 

Kitchen 

Sick 

Hospital 

Idle 



No. 



Total. 



172 



No. 17. 

Return of the value of labour, exclusive of materials, on work done in the Dor- 
chester Penitentiary, for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Various departments. 



Carpenter shop 

Tailor shop 

Shoe shop 

Blacksmith shop 

Machine shop 

Bakery 

Saw-mill 

Wooden manufactures 

Farm 

Stables and teamsters 

Cutting and hauling firewood. 

Boiler room 

Work on dyke 

Kitchen 

Waiters and cleaners 

Washing 

Barber 

General work around yard . . . 





$ cts. 


1,366 50 


2,525 50 


1,223 00 


525 00 


571 00 


466 50 


2,604 50 


2,393 50 


1,628 50 


2,141 50 


1,779 50 


290 00 


551 00 


964 50 


1,967 50 


645 50 


127 50 


1,608 50 


23,379 50 



80 



Department of Justice. 



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56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 19. 

DOECHESTER PENITENTIARY. 

Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



A. 1893 



Staff Salaries. 

Warden, John B. Forster 

Deputy warden, Charles Ross 

Accountant and schoolmaster, John A. 

Gray 

Surgeon, Robert Mitchell 

Protestant chaplain, Rev. J. R. Camp- 
bell 

Roman Catholic chaplain, Rev. A. D. 

Cormier 

Roman Catholic chaplain, Rev. A. D. 

Cormier, arrears 

Storekeeper and steward, John Eraser. 

Engineer, James A. Piercy 

Hospital overseer, F. A. Landry 

Carpenter instructor, Charles Miller. . . 

Blacksmith do John Downey. . . 

Shoemaker do Nathan Tattrie . . 

Tailor do Wm, R. Burns . . 

Woodenware do Wm. Hogan .... 

do do do arrears 

do ^,do Henry Godsoe. . . 

do do do arrears 

Parmer, A. B. Pipes 

Keeper, John Johnston 

Messenger, James McDougall 

Guards, 13 at $500 

do 1 at 500, 3 months 

do 1 at 430 

do 3 at 400 

do 1 at 400, 9 months 

Teamster, 1 at $300, 11 months 17 days. 
Special matron, Mrs. Forster 



Retiring Gratuity. 

Samuel Barnes 

Uniforms. 

551| yards serge 

45^ do frieze 

7 do broadcloth 

lOi do doeskin.. . 

94f do coat canvas 

107 do twilled cotton. . . . 
115i do grey do .... 

121 J do Italian cloth 

51^ do corduroy 

141 do fancy silesia 

52 do black do 

107 do cottonade 

7 do tweed 

52£ do fancy wool lining. 

5 do sleeve lining 

4 gross buckles 

1 do braid 

1 1 do stay tape 

tape lines 

L2 reels twist 

2 do/., machine silk 

2 ll.s. do 

1 ,; His. sewing silk 

35 fui- caps 

.'5 \ cloth caps 

7 tfross brass buttons 

253 lbs. sol,, leather 

73 pairs boot and shoe uppers 



$ cts. 

2,400 00 
1,300 00 

1,200 00 
1,200 00 

GOO 00 

600 00 

158 38 
860 00 
900 00 
700 00 
700 00 
700 00 
700 00 
600 00 
660 00 

70 00 
660 00 

70 00 
660 00 
600 00 
550 00 
6,500 00 
124 98 
430 00 
1,200 00 
300 00 
285 53 

91 34 

24,820 53 



322 12 

29 57 

34 30 

18 38 

13 23 

13 36 

6 93 

57 68 

20 70 

17 72 

6 11 

29 22 

4 90 

17 32 

2 90 

(i 85 

13 30 

1 61 

1 00 

9 00 

16 00 

15 00 

15 51 

130 00 

43 00 

31 75 

53 13 

110 40 



Rations — Concluded. 

73 lbs. nails 

1 doz. sheepskins 

66 lbs. kipskins 

1 side welt leather 

1 side grain leather 

1 doz. red lining skins 

3 rolls boot webbing 

2 boxes chalk 



Rations. 

907 lbs. tea, at 19c 

3,652 do sugar, at 6c 

4,116 do oatmeal, at 3c. . . . 
5,000 do coarse salt, at ^c. . 

125 do pepper, at 17c 

1,969 do onions, at 3ic 

45 qtls. codfish, at $4.50 

17 brls. mess pork, at $17.50. 

25,289 lbs. beef, at 6ic 

13 brls. herring, at $4 

115 galls, vinegar, at 20c. . . . 
393 do molasses 

531^ lbs. tobacco, at 35c . . . 
1,539 do beans, at 3£c 

5 bags fine salt 

672 lbs. rice, at 3|c 

400 brls. flour, $5.68 

29 lbs. hops, at 50c 

50 do malt, at 6c 

392 do barley, at 2^c 

4 brls. peas, at $5. . ." 

420 lbs. butter, at 20c 

6 brls. cornmeal, at $3.25. . . 
400 bush, potatoes, at 40c. . . 
'Xmas extras 



Convict Clothing. 
l,011f yds. grey flannel, at 40c 



*2 



do grey tweed, at 44c 

do black and grey tweed, at 50c 

do coat canvas. . . 

do drilling 

do grey cotton . . . 

do twilled cotton. 

do holland 

do corduroy 

do French canvas 

do jean 

do white duck . . 

do osnaberg 

161 straw hats 

10 pairs moccasins 

6 doz. handkerchiefs . 

3 gross buckles 

3 do stay tape 

do pant buttons. . 
lbs. sewing silk.. . . 

do linen thread. . 

do yarn 

do drafting paper 

do beeswax 

do sole leather . . . 

do wax do 
5!)} do calfskin 



323^ 
403 
96^ 
124* 

408i 

228" 

96 

7 f 
14H 

56 " 

52 

8.', 



12 

10 
36 

210£ 

30^ 

\ 

2,087 
520 




Department of Justice. 

No. 19. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Continued. 



Convict Clothing Concluded, 

2 sides welt leather 

3 doz. sheepskins 

1 gross square awls 

.~> do sewing do 

loo ll.s. zinc nails 

50 do hungarian nails 

1 do bristles 

50 do iron nails 

18 do shoe thread 

(i do toe tacks 

B gross lasting tacks 

24 pairs lasts 

1 doe. rasps 

(i pairs boot-forms 

10 boxes eyelets 

6 crimping machines 

2 doz. bottles burnishing ink. 

1 do shoe rasps 

1 lb. hard ash 

Repairs to sewing machines 

Subscription to Tailor's Journals. 



I) ischa rge Cloth ing 

522f yds. tweed 

11!! do hoiland 

44. \ do Italian cloth 

90 do coat canvas 

110! do silesia 

6 do braid 

22 do linen thread 

24 gross buttons 

1 lb. silk reels 

12 reels twist 

22 doz. handkerchiefs 

5jt do neckties 

7 do pairs braces 

0£ do felt hats 

Ik do caps 

Gj\ do undershirts 

6^ do drawers 

6& do cotton shirts 

32 lbs. drafting paper 

2 bales wadding 

44 calfskins 

12 sheepskins 

10 lbs. toe tacks 

1,000 needles 



Discharge Allowances. 

1 convict at $ 5 

27 do 6 

5 do 7 

HI do 8.... 

3 do 9 

B do 10 

3 do 15 



$ cts . 

9 00 

10 60 
2 00 

7 25 

11 00 
6 00 

80 
2 50 

10 20 

1 50 

54 
10 20 

2 50 
4 00 
2 00 
2 50 
4 80 
2 50 

8 00 

1 96 
10 00 

1,840 07 



270 83 
14 28 

20 03 
13 44 
12 90 

00 
24 00 
17 72 

7 50 

10 37 

21 80 

8 45 

11 69 
41 66 

4 90 

39 00 

40 13 
37 09, 

2 56 
10 00 
33 00 

3 50 
2 50 

1 20 



649 21 



Bedding. 



100 blankets at $1.80. . 

160 yds. ticking 

543 do forfar sheeting at 27c 
350 do towelling at 6Ac . ... 



5 00 
162 00 
35 00 
152 00 
27 00 
90 00 
45 00 

516 00 



180 00 
22 11 

146 61 
22 75 

371 47 



Interments. 

Clothing and coffin fittings . . 
Expressage of body to Truro. 



Chapel. 

Wine, altar, bread and candles 

Washing altar linen 

Catechisms, beads and scapulars 

Church ornaments 

Flambeaux,' &c 

Roman Catholic organist Mrs. LeBlanc 
Protestant organist, Miss Forster 



Libraries. 

50 lbs. junk board, at 6c 

2 copies Life Leo XIII 

1 do Sir John A. Macdonald. 

45 volumes 

Subscription to St. John Sun 

do Empire . . . 



Escapes. 

Expenses on search for escaped convict 
Peters 

Hospital. 

85 lbs. biscuits 

2 do coffee 

50 do granulated sugar 

It? doz. oranges. : 

2 do' oysters 

66 do eggs 

179| lbs. butter 

61 yds. white cotton 

4 doz. knives and forks 

1 box sponges 

8 rolls batting 

1 doz. tumblers 

1 do pairs spectacles 

3 catheters 

2 yds. plaster 

Drugs and medicines 



Transfer of Prisoners. 

2 transfers to Kingston Penitentiary 
Heating. 

7 tons hard coal 

137^ do s °ft coa l 

1 old stove 

12 boiler couplings 

Grate linings 



Light 

1245| ! galls, oil at 20c. 
30 oil barrels at 60c . 

2 lamps 

6 lanterns 

37 doz. chimneys . . . 

6 do burners 

4 gross wicks 

10 do matches . . . . 



9 cts . 

1 78 

2 94 



7 72 



22 00 
6 oo 
4 00 
12 00 
11 15 
50 oo 
50 00 

155 15 



3 00 

8 00 

6 00 

3S 92 

5 00 

6 00 

66 92 



35 88 



9 09 
80 

3 50 
73 
30 
9 61 

33 92 
6 99 

4 26 
3 00 

40 

1 20 
1 20 

1 25 

2 05 
264 16 



342 46 



250 75 



38 65 

393 69 

1 50 

4 60 

5 91 



444 35 



249 25 

18 00 

6 15 

4 50 

20 40 

10 02 

3 40 

3 00 

314 72 



83 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 19. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30lh June, 1892 — Continued- 



Repairs to Buildings 



5 brls. cement 

16 casks lime 

6 brls. coal tar 

2 brls. charcoal 

6 boxes glass 

16 locks 

8 door latches 

204 lbs. galvanized iron . . 

9 kegs spikes 

6 kegs nails 

12 gross screws 

51 lbs. solder 

1 jackplane 

2 augers 

3 lbs. borax 

473 lbs. tarred paper 

1 doz. pencils 

7 pairs hinges 

16 whitewash brushes 

12 doz. brushes 

Rope, hose and couplings. 

Tape and cord 

Repairing prison roof. . . . 



$ cts. 



Ma intenance of Mach inery. 

1 burr machine 

1 turning machine 

1 wiring do 

1 pair stock shears 

1 pair elbow bench shears 

1 stove pipe former 

,2 soldering irons 

42 galls, cylinder oil 

171 f galls, black oil 

1 side lace leather 

1 vise 

129 lbs. lead pipe 

7 com]), bits 

2 bags fire clay 

1 brl. calc. plaster 

Repairs to saws 

18 stop-cocks 

10 iron castings 

2 brass cocks.. 

1 doz. saw blades 

Rivets and solder 

41 couplings and pulleys 

1 set Morse drills 

265 11 >8. sheet lead 

1 set stencil letters 

24 ft. belting 

25 lbs. boat nails 

40 lbs. steel 

1 doz. axes 

1 clock 

25 lbs. dry red lead 

34 lbs. black lead packing 

116 Lbs. sheet lead 

99 ll»s. ties 

100 ll.s. drier 

1 doz. scoops ". . . . 

40 II is. yellow metal 

!»2 lbs. galvanized sheet iron 

500 saw teeth 

Hose couplings and ties 



Kitchen. 

'J, c.io |i,s. common soap, 4!c, 

29 His. castile soap 

8 doz. toilet soap 



(5 
50 

55 
93 
64 

04 

41 

15 

60 

65 

s,s 

95 

14 

00 

54 

99 

60 

25 

85 

20 

93 ! 

08 | 

43 



280 66 



464 29 



118 
3 
4 



Kitch en — Concluded. 

10 tin dishes 

6 doz. dippers 

10 doz. pans 

6 doz. plates 

16 doz. spoons 

12 sets knives and forks 

18 doz. brooms 

784 lbs. sal-soda 

6 fly traps. 

6 doz. mirrors 

1 box tin for pans, &c 

Tableware for officers' mess. . 



Stationery 



From Stationery Office . 
2 packing cases 



Queen's Printer. 
Printing account books and forms . 
Farm and Stables. 

1 Acme harrow 

; 1 springtooth harrow 

\ 1 cultivator 

I 1 road scraper 

\ 1 pupg.. 

3 pairs hickory oxbows 

3 oil-cloth covers 

1 tripod harrow 

1 seed sower 

1 cutter grindstone 

1 riding saddle 

32 lbs. harness leather 

Repairs to harness 

Repairs to waggon . ... 

Rope 

Hay and garden seeds 

75 lbs. horse-shoe nails 

Plough fittings 

Mowing machine fittings 

Hay rakes and forks 

6 scythes 

44 baskets 

23 brls. cornmeal 

4 doz. axe handles 

Shoeing horses 

Services of stallions 

12 horse brushes 

12 curry combs . 

24 dyke spades 

24 potato forks 

17 lbs. chain 

6 shovels 

2,473^ bushels oats 

11 do barley 

2 do buckwheat 

36 tons hay 

16 do grass-standing 

Legal expenses — Turner marsh 
Fertilizer 



Miscellaneous. 



84 



Telegrams. . , 

Postage 

Freight 

Express 
Advertising. 



261 03 


99 81 
1 00 


100 81 


54 40 



Department of Justice. 

^o. 19. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Concluded, 



Miscellaneous Concluded. 

llttTcst 

'( lephone 

quarters 

)ffioe furnishings 



Travelling Expenses. 
John B. Forster 



Industries. 



! 0,400 lbs. black hoop iron, g in . 
12 lbs. do lin. 
i,352 lbs. galv. do § in . 
5,464 lbs. do do fin. 
§2,000 tinned rivets 

2,0844 ^ )S - ' ron w * re 

• reams sand-paper 

LOO lbs. cut tacks 



8 cts. 

54 25 
20 00 
26 oo 
68 90 



590 08 



27 11 



393 25 

3 92 

117 60 

142 18 

16 60 

72 21 

19 50 

13 50 



Industries Concluded. 

4 doz. axes 

2 pairs shears 

147 galls, paint oil 

173 do turpentine 

41 do varnish 

40| do japan 

4,374 lbs. dry white lead 

200 lbs. exhibition red 

100 lbs. patent dryer 

1,364 lbs. whiting 

Brushes 

1,547 lbs. zinc 

37,205 ft. pine logs 

121,524 ft. spruce 

400 logs 

3 cords birch 

Total 



S cts . 



6 75 


7 21 


91 47 


99 17 


:;:; 00 


28 55 


208 29 


40 00 


7 60 


8 45 


11 70 


107 78 


316 23 


442 H4 


92 00 


7 50 


2,287 45 



43,464 94 



85 



18—6 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 18! 



Dr. 



No. 20. 
Balance Sheet, Dorchester Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 



Land 

Buildings.. 

Armoury 

Mason 

Chapel 

Library 

Machinery 

Hospital 

Officers' quarters 

School 

Office furniture . . 
Prison do 
Carpenter shop. . 
Blacksmith do . . 
Shoe do . . 

Tailor do . . 

Farm 

Industries 

Storekeeper 

Steward 

Baker 

Customers 



$ cts. 


20,800 00 


367,000 00 


808 50 


83 60 


1,274 44 


313 50 


3,352 45 


597 93 


1,121 25 


32 25 


966 25 


6,189 51 


762 34 


407 31 


272 44 


742 74 


5,302 83 


1,896 92 


3,164 78 


237 93 


186 16 


263 06 


421,776 19 



Balance 



$ I 
421,776 



421,77( 



86 



Department of Justice. 



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56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



No. 22. 
Library Return of the Dorchester Penitentiary for the Year ended 30th June, 189' 



General library 

Protestant library 

Roman Catholic library 



Total Number 
of Volumes 
in Library. 



540 
224 

308 



1,072 



Number 

added during 

Year. 



101 



Number of 
Convicts who 
used Books. 



138 

105 

45 



288 



Total Numb, 
of issues 
during Yeai 



7,176 
2,730 
1,170 



11,076 



88 



Department of Justice. 



MANITOBA PENITENTIARY. 



e,l> 



No. 1. 

1 REPORT OF THE WARDEN FOP THE YEAR ENDED 30tii JUNE, 1892. 

Manitoba Penitentiary, 

Stony Mountain, 30th September, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report for fiscal year ended 30th 
Tune, 1892. 

The movements of inmates for the year have been as follows : — 

Convicts remaining 30th June, 1891 71 

Received since 36 



107 
Discharge during the year 32 



Remaining 30th Jane, 1892 75 

Lunatics remaining 30th June, 1892 39 



Total inmates 30th June, 1892 114 



Daily average of convicts 69-98 

do lunatics 44*48 



do inmates 114*46 



The above is a slight decrease of returns of last year. 

The expense of the institution, I am glad to say, shows a decrease; the gross 
expenditure for the year ending June, 1891, being $50,120.57 against $45,401.34 for 
this year — a decrease of $4,719.57, or $67.40 per convict. 

This saving has been made under heads of rations, clothing, hospital, postage, 
telegrams, printing and stationery, travelling allowance and light. 

Considerable improvements have been made in the security of the prison: three 
outside doors — one in main prison building, another in laundry passage and a third 
in laundry building — have been bricked up as unsafe and unnecessary; several 
windows have had their iron protection strengthened. Two strong iron gates have 
been erected, one across the main hall entrance and the other in basement passage 
immediately below, cutting off any possible escape by way of accountant and store- 
keeper's offices. 

The prison wall to be constructed will complete the protection necessary for 
such an institution. 

Upon my recommendation the Minister has directed the moving of the dry shed 
to points where it can be put to practical use. The building is 150 feet in length 
and was formerly used as a rink, and it has now been cut in two unequal portions ; 
1 one part of 90 feet has already been moved to the farm-yard and has been filled with 
hay for winter consumption. The remaining 60 feet will shortly be placed near the 
Canadian Pacific Railway depot to serve as a coal shed, the railway authorities 
having granted a site for the building. 

In the past our coal was dumped from the cars into the snow or water as the 
case might be. There was considerable waste in this method. Our shed will obviate 
this in future and will also save labour in loading and teaming. Heretofore the 

89 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



coal was hauled to the farm-yard and stored, from whence it had to be reloaded and 
teamed to points inquired. This second handling will now be unnecessary as the 
coal will remain in the shed at the depot until required and then hauled direct to 
points where needed. 

The farm has been very much extended since my taking charge, when only 45 
acres were cultivated; this year we have taken crop off 89 acres — 45 acres oats, 2*7 
barley, 13 potatoes, 4 flax and turnips. About 34 acres of new land have been broken, 
which will make a total of 123 acres for next year's crop. 

The above produce is intended for rearing and fattening about 100 hogs for 
prison consumption ; the pork obtained in this way will cost about 4 cents per pound! 
as against 8 and 9 cents paid to contractors. The saving in this direction will bej 
considerable. We have already a fine lot of pigs, but the numbers are not what they 
should be owing to the havoc made by hog cholera last fall. We expect, however, 
to kill five tons of pork this fall. 

By direction of the Minister tho reserve has been inclosed with a wire fence, 
with the exception of a small openning left on the north-east corner adjacent to the! 
village of Stony Mountain. A road is thus left through the reserve. It would not 
be out of place for me to mention here that the municipality of Eockwood have] 
petitioned the department for a right of way through the penitentiary land. If 
this be granted and the road located where desired, 12 acres of our best farm land,] 
and already under cultivation, will be taken away. To my mind the travelling public) 
will be in no way benefited, as the proper road allowance skirting the west 
side of the reserve is the direct road between Winnipeg and all points north of the! 
Mountain. In support of my statement it will be sufficient to mention that a hotel,] 
stables and stores are now under construction near the Canadian Pacific Eailwayj 
depot at Stony Mountain, and on this road allowance, the spot being chosen as the] 
best location for the convenience of travellers. The benefit of a road through the 
reserve would be confined entirely to the village of Stony Mountain, and would be 
useless unless the expropriation of the road were continued a distance of 13 miles to| 
Winnipeg — an expensive matter for the mere object of saving of a quarter of a mile, 
necessary to get on the road allowance above referred to instead of coming through! 
the reserve. 

The cesspool receiving drainage from the quarters occupied by the chaplaine 
and surgeon has been offensive, especially to the Eoman Catholic chaplain, in frontj 
of whose door it was located. I have therefore had the course of the drain altera 
and the cesspool removed to about 100 yards farther south. 

The meat contractor having to slaughter his animals elsewhere has clearec 
away another cause of the offensive smells, at one time prevalent around the prisorl 
buildings. 

The lemoval of the insane at an early date will be a step in the right direction;] 
the patients themselves will benefit greatly by the change. Their return here ir| 
l« w 88 was a mistake, which four years' experience has too well proven. After theii 
removal the hospital building will be free for some other use. The upper flat woul 
serve admirably for tailor and shoe shops — the lower floor would afford more thai 
ample accommodation for our convict sick. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 



J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



GEO. L. FOSTEE, 

Warden. 



90 



Department of Justice. 

No. 2. 

Statement showing Cost per capita for 1891 and 1892. 

I >aily average, 7<». 



Expenditure. 



alaries... 

rratuitu s 

informs. 



itions 

othing 

Bcharge clothing 

^veiling allowance and gratul 



•■■ Iding 

lospital 

Chapels 

Cscapes 

i library 
It 'pairs to buildings 
(tables 

Mtchen 



arm 

Maintenance of machinery 

[eating 

^ight 

Vrmoury 



' encmg 

Jueen's Printer and stationery. 
Felegrams 

Express charges 

Freight 

Advertising 

Travelling expenses 

,'Vttornies fees 

Special service 

[Transfer of convicts 

Justice fees 

il'hoto camera 

Telephone 

ppecial furnishing 

Jhristmas extras 



Total 



Cash 
Expenditure 

fori Si II 
and 1892. 



$ cts. 

19,833 76 
671 92 

770 72 
7,406 19 
1,900 46 

367 49 

(174 US 
326 36 
597 94 
169 21 
330 58 

70 30 

1,136 96 

1,103 37 

387 45 

301 47 

60 10 
6,702 89 
190 65 
3 40 
321 30 
410 65 
382 32 

84 24 

77 89 

39 98 
260 27 

80 07 

43 45 
7 00 

72 35 
198 65 

12 00 

7 52 

135 00 

232 40 

32 02 

45,403 01 



( Add 

Stock on 
Hand, 

1891. 



% cts 



432 16 

452 is 

453 is 
88 76 



199 97 
13 00 



275 30 
60 00 
70 42 

77 98 



873 75 
476 32 



78 65 
12000 



3,671 97 



Total Ex 


pendil ure 


for is«. H 


and L892. 


cts. 


L9,833 76 


671 92 


1,202 88 


7,858 67 


2,353 64 


456 25 


674 68 


326 36 


7'. '7 91 


182 21 


330 58 


70 30 


1,412 26 


1,1(53 37 


457 87 


379 45 


60 10 


' 7,576 64 


66(5 97 


3 40 


399 95 


410 65 


502 32 


84 24 


77 89 


39 98 


260 27 


80 07 


43 45 


7 00 


72 35 


198 65 


12 00 


7 52 


135 00 


232 40 


32 02 


49,074 98 



1 )l'(|ll(t 

Stock, 
Sales, As} 
luni Sup 
plies, &c. 

■S cts. 

2,460 on 


17:; 21 
1,770 is 
1,174 74 

120 til 

"37*38 

99 19 




212 59 
37 60 

161 74 
35 25 


1,555 67 
269 62 

"6 75' 
11600 






2 10 


















11,220 36 



.\.t Cash 

'. pendil ure Per capita 



for is; 11 
and 1S92. 



s cts. 

17,373 76 

671 92 

1,029 67 

3,088 00 

1,178 90 

336 21 

(574 68 
288 98 
(ilis 72 
182 21 
303 58 

70 30 

1,199 67 

1,125 77 

296 13 

344 20 

60 K) 
6,020 97 
397 35 
3 40 
399 20 
410 65 
392 32 

84 24 

77 89 

39 98 
258 17 

80 07 

43 45 
7 00 

72 35 
198 65 

12 00 

7 52 

135 00 

232 40 

32 02 



37,854 62 



( lost. 






540 78 



Net cash expenditure , $37,854 62 

Per capita cost $ 540 78 

Less — For balance paid by the Department of Interior on 

account of insane patients $11,107 47 

Cash revenue 1,017 51 

12,124 98 

Net expenditure $25,729 64 

Net cost per capita per annum $ 367 56 

Per convict per diem $ 1 00 



P. McGowan. 

Accountant. 



GEO. L. FOSTEK, 

Warden. 



91 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 189) 

No. 3. 

REPORT OF THE PROTESTANT CHAPLAIN. 

Manitoba Penitentiary, 

Stony Mountain, 22nd August, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report of Protestant prisoners i 
this penitentiary for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

Number on books, 30th June, 1891 45 

do received during year 25 

70 

do discharged by expiration of sentence. 18 

do transferred to Kingston penitentiary... 3 

do escaped 2 

do pardoned 1 

24 

do remaining on books, 30th June., 1892 46 

Showing an increase of 1 over last year. Of this number there are 45 male and 
female convict. The latter being a girl not 15 years of age when received, who* 
tender age suggests that had there been a reformatory for federal convict 
there she should have been sent, rather than to associate with criminals of a moi 
hardened type. 

The usual Sunday services have been regularly performed. In addition to th 
instruction thus given, early in January I opened, a bible class, inviting all convicl 
present, who cared to do so, to attend. The warden kindly placed a room at m 
disposal, and provided a suitable guard. I have met with much encouragement froi 
this venture, as evidenced from the steady increase both in point of numbers attendin 
as well as deep earnestness manifested in those subjects under discussion. I earnest! 
pray God may continue to vouchsafe His blessing on our little gatherings, so thi 
much spiritual good may be realfzed and experienced by all those attending. Th 
attendance at our first gathering was 10, now it is 33. Perfect order and decorui 
obtains at these meetings. 

On Sunday, 26th June, at the regular morning service, an adult Indian unde 
sentence of death, was, after due preparation and at his own request, received int 
the church by the solemn rite of baptism. Under the special circumstances of th 
man's crime, and the short time to elapse before the sentence was to take effect, 
was a most solemn and trying service, felt equally by myself and all those presen 
By the intervention of the public, generally, a petition for commuting his sentenc 
to life was prepared, and owing to the apparent circumstances surrounding the cas<; 
was granted by the Governor General. 

The conduct of those attending my ministrations has, with one exception, bee 
all that could be desired. The exceptional case is that of an illiterate and stubbor 
negro. From the time of his inception here, he has been a " thorn in the flesh," nc 
only as regards his spiritual affairs, but also in respect of almost every rule of th 
prison. Every argument known has been used with this man in order to bring hii 
to view things in a proper light, but with little success. His case is now, I unde 
stand, under consideration with the object of transferring him to Kingston. SpeaJ 
ing only in regard to his spiritual condition I am led to think, that if not insane o 
this subject, that he is a most hopeless and desperate case. 

Considerable disappointment was felt by the convicts in not being allowed, fo 
some reason or another, to have (as was usual upon all similar occasions) theij 
chapel decorated with evergreens, &c, on Christmas. The small expenditure fo 
such was so trivial that I earnestly hope in future it will warrant the department i 
even acceding to this plea of a time-honoured custom, if nothing more, on the great 
est day of all to those who bear the name of Christians. 

92 









Department of Justice. 

The school and library continue to do most useful work under the painstaking 
care and solicitude of Mr. Bourke and his assistants. As has been previously men- 
tioned, only the elementary subjects are generally taught. Still we find, that not a 
few young men who are unfortunate to be sent here, having long sentence to servo, 
who are thoroughly versed in these simpler subjects, are yet desirous ot prosecuting 
their studies to a higher degree. Mr. Bourke is ever ready to go out of his way, by 
lending his own books and drawing from others, in order that their desires may be 
gratified. I would strongly uige that Mr. Bourke be allowed to obtain such books 
not in stock as he may require, with every due regard to economy, for such deserv- 
ing convicts. 

The choir continues its good work, under many difficulties (proverbial in all 
choirs, but more especially found to be so in prisons) by the persistent efforts of Mr. 
Deuden. 

By permission of the warden, I have had the assistance from time to time, of 
Rev. W. A. Burman, principal of Rupert's Land Indian Industrial School, in minis- 
tering to those Indians assigned to my care. To this gentleman and true friend of 
the Indian I owe a very great debt of gratitude. 

Last but not least, I have with much regret to refer to some interference in 
their religious convictions felt by those regularly assigned to my care, and to ven- 
ture to suggest a remedy for obviating all such painful matters if I may be allowed, 
in the future. 

There is no need for me to enter into details of interference here, other than 
mention the mere fact. No end can be gained thereby. Therefore I would respect- 
fully suggest, trusting it may meet with your earnest consideration if not approval, 
that when any convict is convicted and sentence is to be passed on him by the pre- 
siding judge, that before leaving the prisoner's dock, the judge or sheriff, ascertain 
his religious persuasion and that this be signed by such officer and forwarded by 
judge or sheriff along with the customary commitment papers, to be handed over to 
those responsible for the safe custody of such — and that this shall in all cases be 
held an official declaration of his or their belief, except when sincerely and earnestly 
convinced to the contrary, to be determined by the minister or inspector. 

Much difficulty and embarrassment would I think in this way be spared the 
wardens, and certainly all of the chaplains would accept it as a most fair and equit- 
able solution of what is often a vexed subject. Good-will and the kindest relations 
would or should then exist from one officer to another. 

In conclusion, sir, I beg to renew my thanks to all those officers who have 
assisted me in the discharge of my duties. 

I am sir, your obedient servant, 

ARTHTJK W. GOULDING/b.D., 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., Protestant Chaplain. 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



No. 4. 
REPORT OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN. 

Manitoba Penitentiary, Stony Mountain, 13th August, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to forward my annual report for the fiscal year ended 
the 30th day of June last. 

At the end of the year there were some 25 convicts under my charge. It is 
about the same number I had the year before. 

In a general way those I had have given me satisfaction. 
I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant 

G. CLOUTIER, Ptre, 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., Chaplain. 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 

93 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



No. 5. 



REPORT OF THE SURGEON. 



Manitoba Penitentiary, Stony Mountain, 25th August, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ended 30th 
June, 1892. 

I have to report no cases of severe illness, no accidents of a serious nature and 
no deaths. My department, under the efficient management of hospital overseer 
Bourke, furnishes nothing specially important calling mention here. 

The insane still under my care have received every attention which it is 
possible to give them here. 

Number of days in hospital 487 

The warden has been kind in his attention to the sick, for which he has my 
thanks. 

The usual returns are hereto appended. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



W. R. D. SUTHERLAND, M.D., 

Surgeon. 



Annual Return of Sick treated in Hospital, Manitoba Penitentiary, from 1st July, 

1891, to 30th June, 1892. 



Disease. 



Biliousness ' 

Burn 

Conjunctivitis 

Diarrhoea 

Debility, nervous 

Dyspepsia 

Epilepsy 

Gumboil 

Insomnia 

Neuralgia 

Nephritis 

Rheumatism 

Rheumatic arthritis. . 

Syphilis 

Sprain 

Toothache 

Wound 

Total... 



24 



21 



X 



W. R. D. SUTHERLAND, M.D., 

Surgeon, 



94 



Department of Justice. 

No. 6. 
KEPOET OF THE SCHOOLMASTER. 

Manitoba Penitentiary, 22nd August, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual school report. The enrolled attend- 
jance for the year was 23. In addition to this number, many convicts not attending 
school are permitted the use of school books, and nearly all of both classes exhibit 
the same desire to improve which I have noticed in former reports. It is difficult 
ko estimate the amount of good being done by school and library. Apart from the 
use to which the knowledge acquired here may be applied later on, the attention 
iwhich a convict gives to study, especially when he finds he is making good progress, 
has a tendency to remove that melancholy, meditative disposition peculiar to convict 
life. I regret to have to repeat that many of those attending school arc mere youths, 
Ito whose moral improvement penitentiary associations are not favourable. 

Itfrequently happens that a young convict comes here who has a fair knowledge 
of the elementary English branches of learning. He sees before him a long term of 
j imprisonment and desires very naturally to pursue his studies further. To meet the 
requirements of those cases, 1 havo supplied from my own private library as well as 
from that of the Protestant chaplain text books on the more advauced branches. I 
I desire to express my thanks to the Rev. Mr. Goulding for his kindness in this 
matter. I would respectfully recommend that the school be supplied with such text 
books on advanced branches as the schoolmaster may deem necessary. 

I must express my gratitude to the warden, Mr. Foster, for the warm interest 
which he takes in my work. 

Number of volumes in general library 137 

do Protestant library 309 

do Catholic library 199 



Total 645 

Number of volumes added during the year 61 

Number of convicts using books in General library 67 

do do Protestant library 44 

do do Catholic library 23 

Number of volumes issued during year 2,986 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
J. G-. Moylan, Esq., D. D. BOUI^vE, 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. Schoolmaster. 

No. 7. 
Movements of Convicts for fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Movements. 



Remaining at midnight 30th June, 1891 . 
Received during fiscal year 



Discharged by expiration of sentence . 

do escape 

Removed to Kingston female ward . . 
1 >ischarged by pardon 



Con- 
victs. 



Total discharged 

Total remaining midnight, 30th June, 1892 . 



Total. 



107 



GEO. L. FOSTER, 

Warden. 
95 



5G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.' 



A. 1893 



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56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



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98 



I 



Department of Justice. 



No. 10. 

Return of Convicts pardoned in Manitoba Penitentiary during the Fiscal Year 

ended 30th June, 1892. 



No. 


Name. 


Crime. 


Where 
coin icted. 


Term. 


(>0 


Wet-backside 


Larceny .... 


Fort Macleod, N.W.T 


2 years. 









No. 11. 



Return of Recommitments of Convicts in Manitoba Penitentiary during the Fiscal 

Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



No. 


Name. 


Recommitments. 


Crime. 


Remarks. 


r>? 


Joseph Farrell. . 




Larceny and pre- 
vious convictions 
Horse-stealing. 




42 


Alfred Phillips 


First 


about 30 hours after 
discharge from the 
penitentiary. 



No. 12. 
Crimes of Convicts confined in Manitoba Penitentiary 30th June, 1892. 



Crimes. 



Robbing the royal mail 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

Bringing stolen property into Canada 

Doing grievous bodily harm . 

Intent to murder 

Larceny and previous convictions 

Robbery 

Larceny 

Horse-stealing 

Arson 

Stealing 

Attempted rape 



Crimes. 



Shop-breaking 

►Perjury 

House-breaking and larceny 

Receiving stolen property 

Burglary 

House-breaking and cattle stealing 
Carnally knowing a girl under age. 
Killing cattle with intent to steal . . 

Shooting with intent 

Cattle-stealing 



99 



University 

BIBLI0THECA 

Pftavienafa 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893? 



No. 13. 
Terms of Convicts confined in Maniotba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

























<D 






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2 


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75 



Remarks. 



Since commuted to a life term. 



No. 14. 
Race of Convicts confined in Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 



Race. 


Number. 


Race. 


Number. 


White 


63 

1 


Half-breed Indians 


5 
6 


Black 


Indians 




Total 




75 






Nationality of Convicts coi 


No. 15. 
lfined in Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 


Nationality. 


Number. 1 


Nationality. 


Number. 




15 

1 
14 
1 
8 
5 


Dane 

Scotch 


1 




* 9 


English . . 


6 






1 


Irish 


Spaniard 


1 






1 




Total 






75 







No. 16. 
Ages of Convicts confined m Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 



From 

15 to 20 

Years. 


From 

20 to 25 

Years. 


From 

25 to 30 

Years. 


From 

30 to 40 

Years. 


From 

40 to 50 

Years. 


From 

50 to 60 

Years. 


From 

60 to 70 

Years. 


Total. 


12 


16 


14 


20 


9 


3 


1 


75 



100 



Department of Justice. 



No. 17. 
Religion of Convicts confined in Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 



Religion. 


Number. 


Religion. 

1 


Number. 




46 

28 

! 

1 


Unknown— pending decision of de- 
partment 




unan Catholic 


1 




Total 















No. 18. 

Statement of Education of Convicts confined in Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th 

June, 1892. 



Education . 


Number. 


Education. 


Number. 


'annot read nor write 

'an read (English) only 


3 

5 

(54 


Can read Cree (only) 


2 


Can read Italian (only) . . 


1 


• ad and write (English) 


Total 


75 









No. 19. 
Occupation of Convicts confined in Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 



Occupation. 



labourers . . . 
blacksmiths. 

armers 

lerks 

ow-boys . . . 

ooks 

Tailors .... 

arpe titers . . 
firemen .... 

iutcher 

Machinist. . . 



Number. 



Occupation. 



Telegraph operator. 

Steamfitter 

Bricklayer 

Printer 

Painters 

Brassfinisher 

Tinsmith 

Baker 

Jeweller 

No occupation 



Total . 



Number. 



1 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
30 



75 



No. 
Civil Condition of Convicts confined in 


20. 
Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 


Civil Condition. 


Number. 


Civil Condition. 


Number. 


Single 


55 
19 




1 


Married 


Total 


75 






18—7 


1( 


)1 





56 Victoria. ) 
Punishments inflicted 


Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 21. 

on Convicts in Manitoba Penitentiary 
ended 30th June, 1892. 


dun 


ng 


A. 1893 

the Year 


Punishments. 


^5 


B 

bo 

< 


a 

m 


u 

O 

o 

O 


s 

> 

o 


Ph 
CD 

s 

a; 
o 

K 


>> 
eg 
3 


>> 

g 

1 


o 

eg 


<1 


& 


*"5 


3 

o 
H 


Remarks. 


Confined in penal dark cells. 


1 

4 

8 

2 
1 


2 
6 
6 










1 

4 

2 










2 

22 

4 


6 
92 
54 

2 
24 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 

188 




11 
1 


3 


6 
4 


"4' 


13 

2 


9 

9 


5 
5 


9 
9 




Admonished 

Deprived of library books. . . 


*For attempt 
ing to escape 


10 


2 
1 


2 




i 


2 




2 


1 


3 




Confined in cell 










1 


i 






1 




1 


2 


Floerered 










1 




Deprived of all remission . . . 


















*1 
1 

13 










24 




















Totals 


16 


15 


5 


11 


6 


10 


15 


21 


22 


30 





No. 22. 

Statement of days remitted, lost or earned by Convicts in the Manitoba Penitentiary 
during the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Month. 



1891. 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December , 

1892 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Earned. 



4,306i 



Lost. 



372i 


8 


349i 


22 


334 


44 


347^ 


13 


356 


10 


335 


9 


364i 


7 


354f 


22 


355 


19 


366$ 


87* 


403^ 


14 


367$ 


41 



296 



Remarks. 



'Includes 75 days lost I 
one convict for attemp 
ing to escape. 



102 



Department of Justice. 



No. 23. 

VALUE of unproductive labour by convicts in the Manitoba Penitentiary, during the 

Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Employments. 



Kitchen and scullery 

Bakery 

Laundry 

jarpenters' shop 

Tailors' shop 

■Uiof shop. . 

/leaning lamps 

Blacksmiths' shop 

Vt tending stables 

do piggery..... 

Rawing wood and hauling. . . 

rarden 

Farm and root house 

'Iraning grounds 

Butchering 

Repairing quarters 

Fencing farm 

'Packing and hauling ice ... . 

Garden's residence 

jDeputy warden's residence . . 
Painting and whitewashing . 

iHaymaking 

Steward's orderlies 

Storekeeper's orderlies 



(Basement 
Prison 
)hapels 
jVIain hall 

Hospital 
Librarian 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



General employ. 



Days 



1,012 

732 

1,000 

1,650 

2,456 

1,145 

900 

350 

580 

635 

2,163 

1,140 

1,762 

325 

101 

15 

115 

59 

732 

390 

210 

320 

732 

260 

366 

732 

366 

366 

1,064 

366 

500 



22,544 



Rate. 



$ cts. 

25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



Amount. 



$ cts. 

25^ 00 

183 00 

250 00 

412 50 

614 00 

286 25 

225 00 

87 50 

145 00 

158 75 

540 75 

285 00 

440 50 

81 25 

25 25 

3 75 

28 75 

14 75 

183 00 

97 50 

52 50 

80 00 

183 00 

65 00 

91 50 

183 00 

91 50 

91 50 

366 00 

91 50 

125 00 



55,636 00 



GEO. L. FOSTEE, 

Warden. 



18—TJ 



103 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 24. 



A. 189! 



Daily Average of Inmates in Manitoba Penitentiary for Year ended 30th June 

1892. 



Monthly Totals 



Convicts. 



1891 
1891. 



July, 
August, 
September, 1891 . 

1891. 

1891. 

1891. 

1892. 

1892. 

1892. 

1892. 

1892. 

1892. 



October, 

November, 

December, 

January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 



2,315 
2,230 
2,165 
2,138 
2,068 
2,137 
2,079 
1,916 
2,089 
2,064 
2,193 
2,222 



25,616 



Daily 
Averages 



69 98 



Monthly Totals. 



Lunatics. 



July, 

August, 



1891. 
1891. 



September, 1891. 



October, 

November, 

December, 

January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 



1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 
1892. 



Total average of inmates. 



1,418 
1,457 
1,358 
1,395 
1,336 
1,364 
1,364 
1,276 
1,364 
1,306 
1,301 
1,343 



16,282 



Daily 

Average! 



44 -4| 
1144 1 



GEO. L. FOSTER, 

Warden. 



No. 25. 
Eeturn of Officers of Manitoba Penitentiary on 30th June, 1892. 



Name 



Geo. L. Foster 

M. O. D. McDonell 
A. W. Gould ing. . . . 
Gabriel Cloutier . . . . 
W. R. D. Sutherland 

P. McGowan 

Benjamin F. Power. 

Win, Durden 

John Mustard 

I). I). Bourke 

John Smith 

Wm. Shead 

Eli Lusignan 

John I'uigh 

J. O. Beau pre 

George Addison .... 

Wm. Eddies 

P. McFarlane 

I). Gr. Sutherland.. . . 

Charles Gingras 

Wm. (irahame 

E. Freeman 

Amedee Manseau. . . 
Wm. II. Walpole... 
E. Bourke 



Rank. 



Warden 

Deputy warden and chief keeper .... 

Protestant chaplain 

Roman Catholic chaplain 

Surgeon 

Accountant and storekeeper 

Assistant accountant and storekeeper 

Warden's clerk 

Steward 

Hospital overseer and schoolmaster.. 

Engineer and blacksmith 

Tailor instructor . 

Carpenter instructor 

Guard 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do , 

do and messenger 

do 

do 

do 



Religion. 



Protestant 

Roman Catholic 

Protestant 

Roman Catholic 

Protestant 

Roman Catholic 

do 
Protestant 

do 
Roman Catholic 
Protestant 

do 

Roman Catholic 
Protestant. . . 
Roman Catholic 
Protestant 

do 

do 

do ^. 

Roman Catholic 
Protestant 

do ...... 

Roman Catholic 
Protestant 

do ..... 



Date of 
Appointment. 



May 1, 1891 
Jan. 18, 1881 
April 11, 1886. 



do 
May 

Feb. 

do 

Nov. 

Sept. 



5, 1883, 
1, 1882. 
9, 1886. 
1, 1892 
1, 1887. 
1, 1884, 



July 23, 1886 
Nov. 1, 1889 
Dec. 1, 1886. 
April 1, 1892. 
Mar. 24, 1885. 
July 28, 1885. 
Oct. 20, 1885. 
Aug. 19, 1885. 
Feb. 1, 1888. 
11, 1888. 
1, 1891 . 



Dec. 
Feb. 
June 
do 
July 
Mar. 
Sept. 



1, 1891 . 

2, 1887. 
1, 1891. 
1, 1892. 
1, 1891. 



Salary, 



2,000 (! 

1,200 
800 
600 

1,200 

1,100 (j 
700 
660 
800 
870 
780 
750 
600 (I 
650 », 
650 
650 i 
650 i 
590 i 
560 i 
500 ' 
500 
650 
500 
500 
500 



GEO. L. FOSTER, 

Warden. 



104 



Department of Justice. 



co oo a S oi ':£ 

t~ oo »o ** a i-t 
gcoco cocc 



-5 o 






1 t^t^tflCC 

.(NCOGO t- 






t-oo rtiec c 






«occco»t>o»»x 






H 

£ 



c 

23 



< 
C 



105 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 1 8 ) 



A. 1893: 



No. 27. 
Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Salaries. 



Warden, Geo. L. Foster 

Deputy warden and chief keeper, JE. 

D. O. McDonell, 7 days 

Protestant chaplain, A. W. Goulding. . 
Roman Catholic chaplain, G. Cloutier. 

Surgeon, W. R. D. Sutherland 

Accountant and storekeeper, P. Mc- 

Gowan 

Assistant storekeeper, B. F. Power, 4 

months 11 days 

Warden's clerk, Wm. Durden 

Steward, John Mustard 

Hospital overseer and schoolmaster, D. 

D. Bourke 

Engineer and blacksmith, John Smith . 

Tailor instructor, Wm. H. Shead. 

Carpenter instructor, John Puigh, 9 

months 

Carpenter instructor, Eli Lusignan, i 

months 

Guards, 4 at $650 

do 1 

do 1 

do 3 at $500 

Guard Preston, for 2 months 

do McNaughton, 7 months, — days 

E. Bourke, 10 months 

A. McDonald, 9 months 

John Puigh, 3 months 

W. Walpole, 4 months 



$ cts. 

2,000 00 

22 55 

800 00 

600 00 

1,204 00 

1,100 00 

254 27 
660 00 
800 00 
870 00 

780 00 
750 00 

524 97 



do 
do 
do 
do 



Salaries, Asylum Staff 

Attendant, Wm. Abbott 

do A. Pritchard 

do J. H. Hackland . . 

Matron, Ellen McLean 

Attendant, Isabel McLeod. . . . 

do Catherine Davis . . 



Retiring Gratuities. 

P. H. Ennis 

Ben Preston 



Uniforms. 

11 prs of black gloves 

4,000 eyelets 

l,ooo hooka 

10IJ doz. frogs 

5$ lbs. twist 

6 gioss brass buns and rivets 

174 lbs. of French calf 

60 prs. do vamps, at $1.50 

1 pre. do do 2.50 
| yds. silk velvet 

218 yds. silesia 

36 yds. gold braid, at 7.>c 

0} lbs. assorted sewing silk 

6 gross braid assorted 

( loal wadding 

335 yds. coat canvas 

40 yds. grass linen 

Shoe blacking 

2 lbs. rubber tissue 

1 1 j ds. gold cord 



150 
2,600 
590 
560 
1,500 
108 
338 
416 
419 
162 
166 



17,378 06 



500 
500 
500 
360 
300 
300 



2,460 00 



143 

528 



671 92 



Uniforms — Concluded. 

4 doz. Spanish glycerine 

2 forage caps 

2 gold collars 

2 gold crowns 

75 yds. serge, blue, at 70c 

152 yds. do 60c 

101yds. do 55c 

13t; yds. Halifax tweed.. 

2 cap ornaments 

2 doz buckskin mitts 

1 gross military hooks and eyes 
26^ yds. Italian cloth, at 55c . . . 
Coat buttons 



Rations. 

822 sacks flour 

52,121| lbs. beef 

13 brls. mess pork, at $18. . . 

488 lbs. of mutton 

186 do of fresh pork, at 8c 

887i do whitefish 

3,300 do codfish 

2,518 do of butter, at 17c. . . 

515 do of tea 

75 do Java coffee 

280 do raisins 

226 do currants 

500 do rice 

2,003 do beans 

588 do split peas 

804 do pot barley 

3,146 do oatmeal 

3,075 do sugar 

20 do granulated sugar . . 

260 do lard 

30 do hops 

25 do pepper 

h do allspice 

h do cloves 

\ do nutmegs 

3,360 do salt 

300 do fine salt 

342 do chewing tobacco . . 
192^ do smoking tobacco. . 

53 do suet 

45 do baking powder. . . . 

8 do yeast gems 

Essence of lemon 

Lemon peel 

Soda bicarb 

3 doz. of eggs 

2 boxes of clay pipes 

5 brls. of apples 

81 galls, of vinegar 

349 % galls, molasses 



Clothing. 



106 



Shoe knives 

Emery straps 
Awls, assorted . . . . 

h deer bones 

| doz. pincers 

1 doz. lasts 

1 doz. rasps 

2 files 

1 gall, of shoe ink . 



10 (M 
12 Oil 



4 (X 

8 0i 
52 5< 
91 5' 
55 8. 
47 8 

1 
40 2 

6 
14 5 

6 

;io 7 



2,027 

3,181 8 

234 

43 9 

14 8 

49 6 

198 

428 

113 3 

27 7 

19 6 

16 9 

25 
85 1 

17 fi 

28 C 
98 2 

153 7 

1 l| 

26 6 
5 4 

5 (1 
21 
2] 

o a 

37 i\ 

4 c 

174 4 

115 l\ 

3 1 

20 i\ 

6 S 
E 
7 
( 
t\ 

2 J 
16 5 
24 i\ 

197 (I 



,406 



Department of Justice. 

No. 27. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Continued. 



( 'loth ing — Concluded. 



5 lbs. of wax 

;<o Iks. assorted shoe nails 

} lb. bristles 

Lworted shoe rivets 

2 peg wheel markers 

2 lbs. lasting tacks 

3 gross sand paper 

1 gall, shoe varnish 

1 gross assorted awls 

.'-, aoz. hammers 

9 Iks. shoe thread 

1 \ bush, pegs 

1 gross heel ball 

3 llis. rivets 

1,196^ lbs. sole leather 

160 lbs. kip leather 

2*2 lbs. waxleather 

47 lbs. moose hide 

202 lbs. moccasin leather 

8 doz. steel shanks 

2 doz. strip awls 

| gross tailors' needles. 

Singer sewing machine needles . 

35 gross assorted buttons 

15 doz. tape assorted 

White thread assorted 

177 lbs. yarn 

4 doz. straw hats 

014 yds. grey flannel 

478A yds. convicts' tweed 

20.', yds. dress tweed 

'Mm yds. jean 

Pattern paper 

4 pairs hose 

357 i yds- g re y cotton 

2 shawls 

2 pairs gloves 

B yds. black silesia 

115 lbs. moccasin leather 

124A yds. grey tweed 

Wrappers 

3 pairs shears 

2 stencil brushes 

1 box tailors' chalk 

Tailors' thimbles. 

149A yds. duck 

Beeswax 

'1 gr< iss buckles 

48 yds. brown Holland 

Machine knitting needles 

Shoe blacking 

2 clothes baskets 

20 lbs. cotton yarn 

1 Singer sewing machine 

Sperm oil 

Stencils and figures 

Flat-iron holder 

184. 1 , yds. grey cotton, at 9£c. . . 

126| do Kentucky jean 

40 do brown duck 

5 lbs. linen thread 

5 gross bone buttons 

Sundries furnished asylum 



Discharge Clothing. 

55 lbs. Canadian calfskins . . . 

105 feet of cordovan 

1 doz. coloured sheepskins . 

2i do braces 

2h do overshirts 

34 do undershirts 

1$ do drawers 



$ cts. 



1 00 


2 00 


2 75 


2 00 


1 50 


1 00 


1 35 


2 20 


t; 62 


1 62 


7 20 


1 87 


62 


1 50 


382 80 


96 00 


11 00 


47 00 


101 00 


4 00 


1 20 


2 99 


8 04 


10 20 


9 00 


45 52 


69 92 


3 00 


244 05 


237 95 


5 47 


57 39 


4 00 


1 80 


32 90 


5 00 


70 


75 


40 25 


54 67 


1 00 


22 50 


34 


1 10 


20 


34 34 


1 40 


1 30 


7 08 


3 75 


94 


2 50 


9 10 


45 00 


1 25 


7 00 


25 


17 07 


30 42 


8 70 


4 50 


45 


161 49 


1,899 06 


41 25 


21 00 


7 00 


6 63 


19 00 


22 75 


9 75 



DiBckargi Clothing Concluded. 

2 doz. pocket 'kerchiefs 

2 do neckties 

LA d<» felt hats 

8lf do farmers' satin 

272.\ yds. silesia 

\\ doz. linen collars 

10ij| gross assorted coat and vest buttons 

1 doz. fur caps 

2 do mufflers 

127 yds. Canadian tweed, at 04.^e 

42 do gelantina 

gj, doz. vest buckles 



Travelling Allowance and Gratuity. 

11 convicts, at $20 each 

16 do at $15 do 

Paid for railway tickets 

For charges for discharged Indians. . 



Bedding. 

361 yds. of ticking 

40 pairs of blankets, at $3.60 
24 do do 2.65 

112 yds. duck, heavy 

2 pillows 

J chamber set 

Sundries for asylum 



Hospital. 

2 doz. lemons, at 80c. ; Enos' fruit salt, 

$2 _ 

2 boxes dominoes 

2 boilers, copper bottoms 

Playing cards 

1 doz. briar root pipes 

65 yds. white cotton 

25 do grey flannel 

2 jars mustard 

3 oil sheets 

1 cook stove and furnishing 

30 lbs. granulated sugar 

! 1 clock 

21 galls, spirits f rumen ti 

3^ do vini gallicis 

Paid Dr. Blanchard 

do McTavish 

Sundry drugs 



Chapels. 

Paid Wm. Durden, organist. . : , 

do Miss Eva McDonell 

Bottle of port wine 

Prayer books 

Altar furnishings 

Box candles 

Paid for washing altar linen, &c 



$ cts. 

i :,o 

4 70 

13 <u 

44 99 

47 82 

3 00 

16 11 

12 00 

<; oo 

si 1)2 

7 Of) 

i. 75 

307 4!) 



220 00 
240 00 

102 38 
52 30 

074 08 



53 26 
144 00 

63 60 

33 60 
3 00 
3 00 

25 90 

326 36 



2 80 

1 70 
4 00 

3 10 

2 65 

6 50 

7 50 
2 00 
6 00 

34 25 

1 75 

6 50 

47 25 

13 38 

120 00 

10 00 

328 58 

597 94 



62 50 
37 50 

1 25 
10 00 
14 00 

96 
43 00 



Escapes. 



169 21 



?aid expense travelling, livery, &c. . 

do Detective McKenzie 

John Mustard's exp. to Florida 



do 




330 58 



107 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 27.— Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Continued. 



Library. 



70 volumes 

59 yds. brown duck. 



Repairs to Buildings. 

Wire cloth 

1 package tacks 

8 lbs. rivets . . . 

Soil pipe 

2 brls. Portland cement 

2,400 ft. glass 

Files, assorted 

67t? lbs. putty 

Yale blank keys 

2 doz. carpenters' pencils 

17 gross screws 

Pump heads 

5,500 ft. boards 

1,666 ft. pine 

8 kegs nails 

1,203 ft. ash, birch and oak. . . 

533 scantling 

1,804 ft. select pine 

700 ft. ceiling 

151 ft. hickory 

37 ft. cedar 

150 lbs. white lead 

20 lbs. Indian red paint 

15 lbs. glue 

28 lbs. ultramarine blue 

| doz. whitewash brushes. . . . 

1^ doz. paint brushes 

4^ doz. butt hinges 

2 doz. Yale night latches 

J doz. mortise chisels 

§ doz. auger bits 

1 doz. adjustable augers 

Traps, bends and fittings, &c . 

Lead pipe 

14 lbs. block tin 

2,410 lbs. iron 

263 lbs. sheet steel 

10 lbs. nuts 

125 lbs. clinch nails 

19 lbs. brads, assorted 

\ doz. flush bolts 

1 oil stone 

1 diamond 

4 galls, shellac 

1 do walnut stain 

5 do turpentine 

2,700 bricks. 

Paid for plumbing and fitting 
£ doz. locks 



Kitchen. 

§ doz. barber scissors 

3 tea steepers 

Sundry tinware 

3,860 Lbs. of soap 

7 doz. brooms 

125 lbs. chloride of lime.. 

200 yds. towelling 

5 butcher knives 

2\ doz. scrub brushes 

3 doz. spoons 

3 doz. pots pomade 

2 brls. washing soda 

\\ doz. bannister brushes 

2 clothes lines 

1 hair brush 



$ cts. 

58 50 
11 80 



70 30 





1 

42 

11 

113 

7 

2 

1 



5 

19 

101 

63 

33 

60 

10 

72 

22 

9 

2 

10 

3 

3 

5 

1 

3 

3 

5 





4 

30 

8 

3 

74 

15 

1 

7 

2 





5 

12 

1 

4 

31 

305 

2 



17 
50 

10 

56 
50 

oo 
21 
00 
75 
75 
36 
oo 

00 

10 

75 
15 
66 
16 

40 

SI 

22 
50 

00 

00 

60 
20 
03 
31 
00 
71 
88 
00 
70 
oo 
92 
66 
78 
oo 
78 
-II 
75 
65 
50 
00 
75 

00 

05 

35 

25 



1,136 96 



9 00 

3 00 

30 53 

224 56 

18 00 

13 80 

27 00 

3 92 

!> 37 

75 

1 50 
16 80 

6 75 
30 
90 



Kitchen — Concluded. 

Repairs 

1 doz. tumblers 

1 do stove blacking 

1 do combs 

1 do mirrors • 

1 do stove brushes 

1 do razors 

1 do blueing 

Sundries for asylum 



Stables. 



1 double-seated express wagon 

341 bush, oats 

3tj tons bran 

6 do chopped feed 

Unground feed 

56 lbs. flax seed 

181^ bush, barley 

Paid for chopping barley and oats 

h, gross buckles 

3 gross brass burrs 

62 lbs. harness leather 

2 halters 

2 collars 

Harness repairs * 

| doz. tie chains 

2 horse brushes 

1 curry comb 

1 rubber coat and gloves for messenger. 

1 horse whip 

1 doz. axle grease 

Horse liniment 

i doz. neck yokes 

1 martingale 

1 pair spurs and chains 

1 riding saddle 

2 fly nets 

h doz. harness dressing 

I do water buckets 

1 set wheel tires and bolts 

1 bull ring , 

2 lbs. pumice stone 

1 set wheel felloes 

\ doz. tins drop black 

1 gall, carriage varnish 

2 do raw oil. 

2 do castor oil 

1 comb and sponge 

Carriage repairs 

Service of stallion 

lbull 

Paid McNerney 

1 pair horses 

1 horse ! 

Paid veterinary surgeon 



$ cts. 



75 
75 

(Ml 

50 

25 
2 75 
2 42 
30 
4 55 



387 45 



Farm. 

Repairs to implements. 

Hay ground rent 

Garden seeds 

75 lbs. binding twine . . 

Oak plank 

4 pieces timber. 

Iron 

1 ton Bios coal 

Rope 

Service boar pig 

1 set of harrows 

15 bush, seed barley. . . 
Sacks 



48 00 
104 80 

43 25 
162 00 

30 00 

2 80 
38 78 
23 51 

45 

1 50 
19 84 

3 00 
9 00 

50 

2 25 

1 98 
30 
7 50 
80 

75 

5 50 

2 40 

1 75 

2 50 
25 00 

2 50 

6 00 
2 25 
2 33 
25 

20 

1 40 
1 50 
1 75 

1 48 

2 55 
!)5 

4 75 
13 00 
27 80 
22 50 

325 00 

145 00 

4 00 

1,103 37 



28 10 
59 00 
34 80 

11 25 
13 98 

2 00 
13 74 

12 00 
4 56 

3 00 

13 00 
7 50 
50 



108 



Department of Justice. 

No. 27. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Concluded. 



Farm — Concluded. 



154 bush, seed potatoes 

Weights and measures inspector's bill. 
Shovels 



i ar paper 

Veterinary surgeon's bill re sick hogs. 



Maintenance of Machinery 

Sturgeon oil 

1 gauge, $1.50 ; 4 valves 

Stop cocks 

1 doz. files 

1 inspirator 

Tallow 

Mulder 

Mur. acid 

Rubber packing 

I Jandle wick 

Sundry castings 



Heating. 



I cords wood 

)06^$fij tons soft coal . 
"''iV.u, tons hard coal. 

Iron pipe 

Urate bars 

Stove pipe 

Buck saws 

h doz. axes 

1 stove back 



Armoury. 



Repairs to revolvers . 



Kepan 

26 ii»s. 



shot. 



Light. 

'20 gross matches 

(Brackets, chimneys and burners 

Lamp shades 

BjW doz. lanterns 

1476^ galls, coal oil, at 22c. . . ' 



Prisoii furnishing. 



Emery cloth . 
Pots pomade . 
Blank keys . . 



$ cts . 

62 34 

7 75 

8 25 
2 70 

17 00 

301 47 



3 00 

3 26 

3 43 

3 86 

10 50 

14 68 

1 10 

30 

13 57 

50 

5 90 

60 10 



974 47 

4,606 20 

692 11 

10 69 

39 75 

20 82 

4 50 

4 50 

9 25 



6,362 29 



65 
2 75 



3 40 



9 40 
51 57 

8 10 

16 75 

104 83 



190 65 



2 25 

4 50 

5 00 



Prison furnishing ( loncluded. 



Locks 

Cell combs and mirrors. 
( ralvanized iron pails. . . 

( 'onservatory stock 

Scuttle 

Cockroach exterminator. 

BaDCOCk hose 

Bell snap 

Green baize 

Cretonne 

Brown duck 

Bannister brushes 

Repairs electric bells 

Iron 



Screws 

Zinc 

Barber straps 

W. C. paper 

Charges on a wardrobe . 
Bedroom furniture 



Fencing. 



Cedar posts . 
Barb wire . . 



Queen's Printer and Stationery. 

Sundries . 

Miscellaneous. 

Telegrams 

Postage 

Express charges 

Freight do 

Advertising 

Travelling expenses 

Attorney's fees 

Special service 

Transfer of convicts 

Justice's fees 

Photo camera repairs 

Telephone 

Christmas extras 

L e s s — Refunded Depart- 
ment of Interior for 

lunatics, N.W.T $16,257 82 

Officers for provisions. . . 3,420 82 



Total . 



1 ct». 

:;i 00 

2 50 
96 ok 
17 50 

75 

8 00 

3 50 

90 
6 50 
3 50 

2 40 
lo 13 
32 10 
48 80 

6 55 

1 40 
1 34 

3 60 
3 00 

235 27 



556 57 


213 35 
197 30 


410 65 


381 82 



84 24 
77 89 
39 98 

600 81 

80 07 

43 45 

7 00 

72 35 

198 65 

12 00 

7 52 

135 00 
32 02 



45,408 28 



19,678 64 
25,729 64 



109 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



No. 28. 
Balance Sheet, Manitoba Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 



Buildings, land, &c 

Storekeeper 

Steward 

Tailor shop 

Shoe do 

Carpenter shop 

Blacksmith shop . . 

Engineer's department 

Farm stock 

Stables 

Hospital 

Protestant chapel 

Roman Catholic chapel 

Armoury 

School 

Library 

Furniture and office furnishings. 
Officers' quarters 



$ cts. 

315,558 92 

1,053 67 

6,133 00 

1,130 19 

612 45 

553 50 

169 86 

8,529 20 

2,184 25 

3,587 00 

816 95 

864 37 

941 87 

1,245 39 

130 30 

405 76 

1,414 75 

1,838 50 



347,169 93 



By Balance. 



$ cts. I 
347,169 93, 



347,169 9J 



P. McGOWAN, 

Accountant. 



No. 29. 
Statement of the Manitoba Penitentiary Farm for the Year 1891— 


92. 


154* tons hay, at $2.50 


$ ctej 

386 a 

204 4' 


1,022 bushels oats, at 20c 


139 do barley, at 30c 


41 7l 


40 do wheat, at 50c 

1 , 1 47.', do potatoes, at 20c 


20 1 
229 5| 


418£ do turnips, at 20c 


83 7' 


25 do mangels 


6 2 


1 1 5 do sundry vegetables 

244 do onions, at $2 


46 C 
49 


2,529 lbs. pork, at 8c • 

1,000 heads cabbage, at 4c 

189 galls, milk, at 20c 


202 a 

40 q 

97 




1,408 i 

' j 
■ — 1 



P. McGOWAN, 

Accountant. 



110 



Department of Justice. 



No. 30. 
Stock in School and Library, 30th June, 1892. 

School. 

1st Readers 05 

2nd do 32 

3rd do 18 

4th do 13 

Grammar, English 18 

do French 35 

Arithmetics 39 

Geographies, small 12 

do large 20 

Slates 52 

Crayons r 1 box 

Slate pencils li gross 

Histories, British 4 

Spelling books 45 

Dictionaries 5 

Blackboard 1 

Pens '. \ gross. 

Penholders . 3^ doz. 

Library. 

Volumes in general library 137 

do Protestant library 309 

do Roman Catholic library 199 

045 

Volumes transferred for use of Sunday school from general library 91 

do do do Protestant library 41 

132 

Volumes in library 513 

D. D. BOUEKE, 

Schoolmaster. 



Ill 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 



BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY. 



No. 1. 
REPORT OF THE WARDEN FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30th JUNE, 1892. I 

British Columbia Penitentiary, 2nd July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit to you the annual returns on the manage-: 
ment of this penitentiary for the year ended 30th June, 1892. 

On the 30th June, 1891, there remained here 73 convicts; received since, 19 
males, 1 female, total 20. Discharged by expiration of. sentence 15, by pardon 1, byj 
escape 2, which left remaining on 30th June, 1892, 75 convicts. 

I am pleased to note the decrease in number of convicts received during the, 
past year, that is, when compared with the number admitted during former years. 
The conduct of the prisoners has been good, and you will be gratified to know that! 
the general health has been very favourable. Although there has been a great deal 
of sickness in the surrounding neighbourhood, we have suffered very little inconve- 
nience from illness — at the present writing there are no cases in hospital. 

I musi draw your attention to the fact that our water supply is far from sum! 
oient, and at times it is not fit for drinking or cooking. The work of clearing and 
building is going on above the dam; old roads are being reopened, and after rain, 
the condition of the water is most objectionable. 

The city water works are nearly completed, and one of their mains runs along! 
the northern boundary of the penitentiary grounds ; therefore I hope you will seel 
fit to have the prison and other buildings connected with the institution, supplied! 
from that source. 

The school continues to be satisfactorily conducted by Mr. Keary. 

A new wharf, which improvement was very much needed, has been built during 
the year. In order to make it more serviceable for our wants, it will require to bd 
partly covered, 

I am glad to see that an appropriation has been made for heating the prison 
building with hot water. This should have been done in the beginning. It i* 
impossible to keep the place neat and clean with the number of clumsy stove* 
required. 

You will be pleased to hear that the conduct of the officers has been good. ]| 
am happy to say that I have seldom had to report anything to the contrary. 

And now, in closing this short report, I beg you will accept my sincere thank* 
for the kindly assistance received from you on many occasions, not only during th*| 
year just ended, but also during the many years that I have had the honour Oil 
managing this institution ; under your able guidance. 

I remain, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ARTHUR H. McBRIDE, 

Warden. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq , 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



112 



Department of Justice. 



No. 2. 
Per Capita Cost of Convicts for Year 1891-92. 

Daily average, 73. 



Salaries 

Uniforms 

Rations... 

Clothing 

Travelling allowance . 
Discharge clothing . , 

Bedding 

Chapels 

Library 

School 



Hospital 

Heating 

Light 

Repairs to buildings 

Armoury 

Kitchen 

Stationery and Queen's 

Printer 

Farm 

Stables 

Furniture 

Telegrams 

Postage 

Freight charges 

Express charges 

Advertising 

Telephone 

Wharf... 

Industries 

Totals 



Cash 
Expenditure 



$ cts. 

19,749 66 

414 42 

3,860 73 

2,418 86 

267 50 

301 09 

106 75 

107 00 
171 76 

21 00 

20 15 

387 83 

1,125 45 

1,965 05 

2,033 72 

205 45 

517 67 

133 11 

642 76 

127 60 

20 00 

90 30 

44 00 

27 16 

6 50 

51 00 

84 00 

1,379 60 

346 03 



Add 
Material on 

hand 
30th June, 

1891. 



$ cts 



532 79 

113 34 

3,424 50 


180 69 
433 41 

8 38 

55 00' 



185 53 
338 81 
133 08 
439 17 
55 00 
191 00 

190 00 

102 40 

7 37 

46 50 



Total 

Expenditure, 

1891-92. 



$ cts. 

19,749 66 

947 21 

3,974 07 

5,843 36 

267 50 

481 78 

540 16 

115 38 

171 76 

76 00 

20 15 

573 36 

1,464 26 

2,098 13 

2,472 89 

260 45 

708 67 

323 11 

745 16 

134 97 

66 50 

90 30 

44 00 

27 16 

6 50 

51 00 

84 00 

1,379 60 

346 03 



Deduct 
Material on 

hand 
30th June, 

1892. 



$ cts. 

" 71397 

104 61 

4,634 72 


343 50 

121 67 

2 25 


65 00 



181 20 
304 70 
106 83 
689 02 
95 00 
242 47 

186 00 

140 05 

11 12 

47 00 



Net 


Expenditure 


$ cts. 


19,749 66 


233 24 


3,869 46 


1,208 64 


267 50 


138 28 


418 49 


113 13 


171 76 


11 00 


20 15 


392 16 


1,159 56 


1,991 30 


1,783 87 


165 45 


466 20 


137 11 


605 11 


123 85 


19 50 


90 30 


44 00 


27 16 


6 50 


51 00 


84 00 


1,379 60 


346 03 


35,074 01 



Annual 

Per Capita 

Cost. 



$ cts. 

270 54 

3 20 

53 01 

16 56 

3 66 
1 90 
5 73 

1 55 

2 35 
14 

28 

5 35 
15 88 
27 28 
24 44 

2 27 

6 39 

1 88 
8 29 
1 70 

27 

1 24 
60 
37 
09 

70 

1 15 
18 90 

4 74 

480 46 



Amount of revenue, 30th June, 1892 $471 55 

Per capita cost on net expenditure $480 46 

Deduct for revenue 6 44 

Net per capita cost per annum $474 02 



Net per capita cost per diem $1 30 



113 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893, 



No. 3. 



REPORT OF THE PEOTESTANT CHAPLAIN. 

British Columbia Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir. — I have the honour to submit my fourteenth annual report for the yeai 
ended 30th June, 1892. 

There have been 51 convicts under my care during the year, 43 remaining at 
this date ; white men, 17 ; Chinese, 20 ; Indians, 3 ; coloured, 2-, and half-breed, 1 

All the duties of my office have been regularly performed. The conduct of the 
prisoners while attending divine service has been very good. There is nothing oii 
importance to notice in connection with the school, library or singing class. All! 
have been duly attended to. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



ROBERT JAMIESON, 

Protestant Chaplain. 



No. 4. 



REPORT OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN. 

British Columbia Penitentiary, 

New Westminster, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ended 30t 
June, 1892. 

The general conduct of the convicts leaves little to be desired. 

It is to be regretted that better accommodation cannot be provided for those wh<| 
attend the school ; their patience and assiduous attention to study certainly deserv 
great praise. 

The choir organized last year continues to make satisfactory progress. I niigl 
suggest that the organist's remuneration is hardly commensurate with the labou; 
involved and the time taken up. 

The number of convicts under my charge has been reduced during the yea | 
from 28 to 23. 

I cannot conclude without thanking the warden, schoolmaster and other officei 
for their unvarying kindness. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. M. J. MORGAN, O.M.I., 

Acting Chaplain. 
J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 

114 



Department of Justice. 



No. 5. 



EEPORT OF THE SURGEON. 

British Columbia Penitentiary, 1st July, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ended 30th 
rune, 1892. 

The health of the convicts in this penitentiary has been very good during the 
)ast year, and we have reason to be thankful that small-pox, which is now more or 
ess epidemic throughout this province, has found no entrance into the penitentiary. 

I again beg to call to your attention the question of the heating of the prison. 
Che system in use at present gives a very uneven heat, and the alleged hospital has 
>nly a small grate to heat a large room. The substitution of hot water for the pre- 
sent arrangement is a matter which calls for immediate attention, and the whole 
prison should be included in any such system. 

The hospital overseer, Mr. Carroll, continues to discharge his duties in a most 
satisfactory manner. 

I have to thank the warden and other officers for many kindnesses. 



I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. A. DeWOLF SMITH, 



M.D. 



G. Moylan, Esq., 
Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



&c, 
Surgeon. 



Annual Return of sick treated in Hospital from 1st July, 1891, to 30th June, 1892. 



Diseases. 

• 


I 

50 u 

s ^ 
a a 


73 

-fci 

< 


o 


s 


H3 

o 

s 


bb 
g 

'2 

S 

& 


Abscess 




1 

9 
1 
2 

"i 


1 
9 
1 

2 
2 
1 

1 
18 




1 

9 
1 

"2 
1 
1 




Accidents 






.'Chancre 






Insane 




2 


, Phthisis 


2 

1 




Scrofula 




Stricture 




Ext dent 




















3 


14 


35 




15 


2 



W. A. DeWOLF SMITH, M.D., 

Surgeon. 



115 



56 Victoria 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1895 



No. 6. 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOLMASTER. 

British Columbia Penitentiary, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir, — I beg leave to submit ray report on the school at this penitentiary fo 
fiscal year ended 30th June, 1892. 

The average attendance 27. Subjects taught : reading, writing, spelling, dictjii 
tion and arithmetic. 

With pleasure I state that the majority of those attending desire to improve, b; 
embracing every opportunity both in schoolroom and in cell practice. Many than 
are due our warden for the great interest he has taken in this department ; also, t 
the chaplains for their zeal in the good work of education. 

It is to be regretted that a more suitable room for school purposes cannot b 
provided. As it is now, we utilize one side of the wing for teaching, which is not a 
all convenient. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



W. H. KEARY, 



J. G. Moylan, Esq., 

Inspector of Penitentiaries. 



Schoolmaster. 



116 



Department of Justice. 



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117 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



No. 8. 

Eeturn showing Movement of Convicts in the British Columbia Penitentiary duringt 

the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Description. 



Remaining at midnight 30th June, 1891 
Received since 



Discharged : — 

By expiration of sentence . 

By pardon 

By escape 



Remaining at midnight 30th June, 1892 . 



Male. 



Female. Total. 



No. 9. 

Comparative Statemknt of Movement of Convicts in the British Columbia Penjten 
tiary for ten years ended 30th June, 1892. 



— 


1883. 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892 


On bail, by order of Supreme Court 














1 
44 


18 


33 




Admissions : — 


39 
2 

41 

12 

2 


34 
1 

35 

12 
3 
1 


29 


33 


20 


24 


20 


Recaptures 






















Total 


29 
21 

"i" 

4 


33 

21 

2 
1 


20 

32 
1 

'"'a 


24 

30 
6 
1 
3 

1 
4 


45 

18 

2 


18 

25 
8 


33 

33 

2 


20 

15 

1 


Discharges : — 

By Expiration of sentence 

Pardon 


Having sentence reduced. 


Death 


2 






1 




Bail, order of Supreme Court 






Scut to Kingston Penitentiary 












"'2' 








Escapes ' 
















2 




18 
74 


16 
93 


26 
96 
92f 


24 

105 

ioih 












Total . . . 


36 

89 
94 


45 
68 
73^ 


22 
91 

72^ 


33 

76 

80{, 


36 
73 


IS 


Remaining at midnight on 30th June, each year. 


75. 


A eerage, daily 


01 


m 


68f 


73 






11 


8 
















i 



Department of Justice. 



No. 10. 



jiST of Convicts who have been pardoned out of the British Columbia Pentientiary 
during the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



So. 


Name. 


Crime. 


Place. 


82] 


James Kavanagh 


• 

Abominable crime 













No. 11. 

Table of Crimes and Number of Convicts guilty of each Crime, British Columbia 
Penitentiary, for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Description. 



\Iurder 

Manslaughter 

Jobbery with violence 

Maliciously wounding 

\ minding with intent to murder 

Shooting with intent to do grievous bodily harm 
: Obtaining goods by false pretenses 

Sending threatening letters 

eiving 

rtering counterfeit money 

Buggery 

Sodomy 

Abominable crime 

Burglary 

Rape 

Arnault with intent to do grievous bodily harm. . 

Assault occasioning actual bodily harm 

\ ssault with intent 

Attempt at larceny 

I Attempt to break and enter 

Entering house with intent to steal 

Breaking and entering 

House-breaking 

House-breaking and felony 

iking and stealing 

- Larceny from dwelling 

[ House-breaking and larceny 

1 arcenv 

Larceny and receiving 

Feloniously stealing and receiving 

! Feloniously stealing 

Stealing from person 

irgery . 



Indecent assault 

Arson 



Arson 
iPerjury 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



119 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 189 



No. 12. 

Tabular Statement showing number of Convicts sentenced, with length of 

sentence of each. 



Sentence. 



Life 

15 years 

14 do 

13 do 

12 do 

10 do and 13 lashes 

10 do 

7 do 





93 




3 


1 


13 

o 
H 


4 




4 


4 




4 


3 




3 


1 




1 


3 




3 


1 




1 


4 




4 


9 




9 



Sentence. 



o years 

4 do 

34 do 

3" do 

2± do 

2 do and 24 lashes 

2 do 

Total 





o3 






03 

"3 


£ 

03 


14 


1 


8 




1 




16 




1 




1 




22 




92 


1 



Ethnology of Convicts in the 



No. 13. 

British Columbia 
30th June, 1892. 



Penitentiary, for Year ended: 



Race. 



Whites . . . 
Coloured . 
Half-breed 
Indians. . . 





0; 










03 


s 


OS 


3 


03 





46 


1 


47 


5 




5 


8 




8 


7 




7 



Race. 



Japanese 

Chinese 

Total 



03 


Female. 


i 

25 




92 


1 



No. 14. 
Nationalities and Number of Convicts of each Nationality. 



1 description. 


*3 


Female. 


"3 

o 

H 


Description. 


13 


03 

a 

03 


t 


Canada 


20 
7 
5 
5 

19 
1 
3 


.... 


20 

8 

5 
5 
19 
1 
3 


Sandwich Island 


2 
25 




8 


England 


1 reland 




Scotland 


Switzerland 


1 iiitcd States 




Norway 




[taly 


China 




Total 




92 


1 








121 


) 









Department of Justice. 



No. 15. 
Occupations. 



1 description. 


0) 

Is 




Female. 
Total. 


Description. 




* 






4 
1 
39 
1 
4 
1 
!) 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 




4 
1 
.... 39 
1 
4 
1 
9 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 


Wood turner 


i 
i 

i 

2 

1 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


"T 




ivil engineer 

labourers 


Ship carpenter 










Cabinet-maker 
















arpenters 












Shoemaker 










House-keeper 






Total 








92 


i 


93 









No. 16. 
Civil Condition. 



Married 
nngle . . 



Description. 



Total 



Male. 



26 
66 



92 



Female. 



Total. 



No. 17. 
Moral Habits. 





Description. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Temperate 




53 
34 

5 


1 


54 


ntemperate 


34 


\bstinent 








Total 








92 


1 


93 









121 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 189: 



No. 18. 
Ages of Convicts. 



Age. 



Under 20 years 
20 to 25 do 
25 to 30 do 
30 to 35 do 
35 to 40 do 
40 to 45 do 





<ri 










eg 


& 

a 


1 


5 




5 


10 




10 


19 




19 


20 




20 


15 




15 


5 





5 



Age. 



45 to 50 years 
50 to 55 do 
55 to 60 do 
Over GO do 

Total. 



J2 
la 

8 


1 


"3 

5 




7 
4 
4 
3 


" 1 






92 


1 


i 





No. 19. 
Eeligious Belief. 


Description. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total 1 


Roman Catholics. 




33 

10 
9 
8 
2 
4 
1 

25 




3: 


Church of England 


1 


l 


Presbyterians 






Methodists 






- 


Baptists 






Lutherans 






Campbellite 




None 


o: 










92 


1 


9; 




No. 20. 
State of Education. 











Race. 


Could Read when 
admitted. 


Could Write when 
admitted. 


Wholly 
Illiterate. 


Total j 




Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




Whites 


45 
4 

8 


1 


45 
4 

8 


1 


1 

1 




4 

2- 
9' 


( 'oloured 




Half-breeds 






1 adians 




7 
24 




Chinese 


1 
1 




1 
1 






Japanese 
























122 











Department of Justice. 



No. 21. 

iReturn of Punishments awarded in British Columbia Penitentiary during the Year 

1891-92. 



Nature of Punishment. 




< 


S 

ft 


I 

o 

o 


.2 

S 

1 


U 

s 

Q 

Q 


I 


S 


p 


<3 


>> 


| 


Total. 


Bread and water, with hard bed 


4 
3 
1 

1 


2 

3 


1 
1 


1 

3 
1 


.... 


1 
1 


2 




4 
1 


2 

1 
1 
1 


4 
5 


6 
2 


27 
21 








3 


Deprived of light 
















2 


Received corporal punishment 




















1 
36 

1 


1 


























36 




2 
1 




















2 

7 


5 


Admonished 


4 


2 




1 




1 




4 


5 


25 



No. 22. 



Return of Remission of Sentence earned by Convicts in British Columbia Peniten- 
tiary since date of Imprisonment. 



Number. 


Number 

of 

Days. 


Number. 


Number 

of 

Days. 


1 convict earned 

2 convicts earned 


4 
6 

7 

8 
10 
15 
17 
19 
20 
21 
27 
30 
32 
33 
36 
38| 
47 
48 
50 
51 
53i 
62 
60| 
79" 
80i 
82* 
831 
84f 
91 
93 
934 
94 
95 


1 convict earned 

1 do 


1211 
122 


2 do 


2 convicts earned 


125 


do 


1 convict earned 


136! 
145 


1 convict earned 


1 do ' 


1 do 


1 do 

1 do 


149 


1 do 


153 


1 do 


1 do 

1 do 


156! 
168 


1 do 


2 convicts earned 


1 do 


17H 
174 


1 convict earned. 


1 do 


2 convicts earned 


1 do 


176 


do 


1 do 


176! 
177 


do 


1 do 


1 convict earned. . . . 


1 do 


190 


1 do 


1 do 


225 


3 convicts earned. . . 


1 do 


253 


1 convict earned 


1 do 


268 


1 do 


1 do 


280 


1 do 


1 do 


284 


1 do 


1 do 


303| 
310 


1 do 


1 do 


- convicts earned. . 


1 do 


311 


2 do 


1 do 


339i 


1 convict earned . . 


1 do 


351 


1 do . . 


1 do 

1 do 


356! 
362 


1 do 


1 do 


1 do 


424 


1 do 


1 do 


5391 
656" 


2 convicts earned. . . 


1 do 


1 convict earned . 


1 do 


761 


2 convicts earned. 


1 do 


843 


2 do 











123 



5G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 



A. 1893 



No. 23. 

Table of Earnings of Convicts in each description of Labour at the British Columbia 
Penitentiary for the Year ended 30th June, 1892. 



Tailoring 

Farming 

Shoemaking 

House-cleaning 

Clearing land 

Cooking 

Carpentering 

Baking 

Building wharf 

Blacksmithing 

Cribbing ravine 

Driving team 

Washing 

Piling manure 

Making fence 

Weeding 

Orderly 

Gai-dening 

Making road 

Attending stable 

Cleaning road 

Picking stones. ...... 

Mending clothes 

Working in ravine 

Whitewashing 

Building photo studio . 

Laying waterpipe 

Shovelling coal 

Painting 

Shovelling snow 

Building range 



Description. 



Number 

of 

Days. 



3,509* 
2,490" 
2,490 
1,660 
l,503i 
926 
853 
607 
5381 
501 
4821 
451* 
431" 
337i 
335 
329i 
301 
288 
261 
183^ 
176 
95 
88 
73| 
64 
63 
56 
49 
35 
26 
8 



19,2121 



Rate per 
Dav. 



$ cts. 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



Amount. 



$ cts 

1,754 75 

1,245 00 

1,245 00 j 

830 00 

751 75 

463 00 j 

426 50 

303 50] 

269 25 

250 50 j 

241 25 

225 75 

215 50 

168 75 

167 50 

164 75 

150 oil 

144 00 ' 

130 50 

91 7fi 

88 00 

47 50 

44 00 

36 7£ 

32 0C; 

31 5( 

28 0(j 

24 5< ( 

17 5< 

13 (Xj 

4 0( 



9,606 21 



124 



Department of Justice. 



No. 24. 



jIST of the Staff at the British Columbia Penitentiary on the 30th June, 1892, giving 
Salary, Bank, Nationality, Eeligion, Age and date of Appointment. 



Name. 



\itlmr H. McBride. . . 

I aim's Fitzsimmons . . . 

\V. A. De Wolf Smith. 

I Keary 



;.\. \{, Jamieson. . . . 
F.Guertin, O.M.I 

Pirns. A Mclnnes 

W. J. Carroll. 

reo. Mackenzie 

\. Coutts 

lames Miller 

'has. X. Derrah 

ruy W. Walker 

Thus. \V. Quilty 

Hamilton McKee 

Finlay Stewart 

lames Doyle 

Patrick Smyth 

U. J. Robertson 

I). C. McGillivray . . . . 
Adam Jackson 



Mm McXiven.. . . 
Patrick Fiunegan. 
Thomas Sampson. 
W. A. Patchell... 
K. J. Muldoon.... 
Daniel MeMaster. 



Salary 

per 
Annum. 



2,150 

1,400 

600 

1,100 

600 
600 
800 
630 
750 
750 
660 
660 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
600 
590 
590 
590 
560 
560 
530 
530 
500 
500 
530 



Rank. 



Warden 

Deputy warden 

Surgeon 

Accountant, storekeej 

er and schoolmaster, 
Protestant chaplain. . . 

R. C. chaplain 

Steward 

Hospital overseer 

Trade instructor 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Keeper 

Guard 

do 

do 

Teamster 

Guard 

do 

do 

do 

Messenger and guard . 
Guard 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Nation- 
ality. 



Ireland . 

do . 

Canada . 

Ireland . 

do . 
Canada . 

do . 
U. State 
Scotland 
Canada . 
Scotland 
Canada. 
England 
Canada. 
Ireland . 
Canada . 

do . 
Ireland . 
Canada . 

do . 
Australia 
Ireland . 
Scotland 
Ireland . 
England 
Canada . 

do . 

do . 



Religion. 



Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . . . 
Episcopalian ' 

Roman Catholic 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . . . 

Methodist 

Roman Catholic. . . . 
Presbyterian 

do 

do 

Episcopalian 

do 

Roman Catholic 

Presbyterian 

do 
Roman Catholic. 

do 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. 

Episcopalian 

Reformed Episcopal 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic. . . . 

Methodist 

Episcopalian 

Roman Catholic. . . . 

do 



Age 



Date 
of 
Appoint- 
ment. 



May 16, 78. 

Aug. L2, 78. 
Nov. 1, '87. 

Mar. 10, '84. 
Jan. 4, 79. 
May 15, '89 . 

do 10, '82. 
July 23, '86. 
Nov. 1, '83. 
Oct. 1, '86. 
Sept. 24, '88. 
Nov. 1, '88. 
May 17, '92 
Jan. 18, '82. 
Nov. 7, '84. 
April 1, "85. 
Oct. 1, '86. 
Feb. 21, 79. 
Oct. 11 , '87 
Dec. 26, '87 . 
May 18, '88. 
Oct. 1, '88. 
June 1, '89 
Mar. 0, '90 . 
April 1, '90. 
Aug. 18, '90. 
Oct. 1, '90. 
Feb. 1, '91 . 



No. 25. 

JReturn ahowing number of Volumes in Protestant and Eoman Catholic Libraries, 
respectively, showing number of Convicts who have used books from each 
Library; the number of Volumes issued during the year and the number of 
Volumes added. 



Number of volumes at beginning of year 

do do added during year 

do do on 30th June, 1892 

do of prisoners using library 

do of volumes issued during the year 

125 



Protestant 
Library. 



383 
46 

429 

26 

2,704 



Catholic 
Library. 



201 

38 

239 

25 

1,300 



Total. 



584 

84 

litis 

51 

4.004 



56 Victona. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18. 



A. 189; 





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126 



Department of Justice. 

No. 27. 

Details of Expenditure, British Columbia Penitentiary, for the Year ended 30th 

June, 1892. 



Staff Salaries. 

Warden, Arthur H. McBride 

Deputy warden and chief keeper, Jas. 

Fitzsimmons 

Accountant, storekeeper and school- 
master, W. H. Keary 

Surgeon, W. A. DeWolf Smith 

Chaplain, Rev. R. Jamieson 

do Rev. K. Guertin, (). M. I. . . 
do do arrears 

Stew aid, Thos. A. Mclnnes 

Hospital overseer, W. J. Carroll. 
Trade instructor, George Mackenzie. . . 

do A. Coutts 

do Chas. N. Derrah 

do Jas. Miller 

do Kenneth McRae 

do Guy W. Walker 

Keeper, Thos. W. Quilty.. 

Guards, at $600 j)er annum 

do 590 do 

do 560 do 

do 530 do 

do 500 do 

Teamster 

Messenger 



Uniforms. 



10 yds. braid mohair, at 20c. 

7i gross buttons 

25$ yds. frieze, at 65c 

25 summer hats, at $1.50. .. . 

25 winter hats, at $4 

2 lbs. rubber tissue, at $4. . . 
202| yds. blue serge, at 60c. . 
168 yds. blue serge, at 55c. . . 

38 yds. blue serge, at 70c 

Wrappings 



Ration) 



1,4294 lbs. beef, at 12* 

11,306^ lbs. beef, at 9c 

U ton bran 

266 lbs. butter, at 30c 

Christmas extras 

3,876 lbs. salmon, at 6c 

254 brls. flour, at $5,85 

35 lbs. lard, at 10c 

1 kitchen range 

135 galls, molasses, at 45c 

50 lbs. pepper 

1,200 lbs. rice, at 4c 

2,900 lbs. salt, at lc 

I H00 lbs. soap, at 4c 

S lbs. soap, shaving, at 40c 

-,271 lbs. sugar, at 5|c 

279 lbs. tea, at 26c 

398 H>s. tobacco, at 52c 

I 724 galls, vinegar, at 60c 

Woods <fc Gamble, professional services 



Cloth ing. 



is awls 

1 barometer 

2 oz. bristles, at .$1 ] 

99 yds. brown Holland, at 16c. 



cts . 



2,150 00 

1,400 00 



1,1(1(1 
600 
600 
600 

165 

800 

630 

750 

750 

660 

660 

495 

74 

600 

1,800 

1,770 

560 

1,590 

1,000 

600 

560 



19,915 26 



2 

9 

16 

37 

100 

8 

121 

92 

26 





414 42 



178 68 


,017 58 


47 50 


79 80 


46 88 


232 56 


,485 90 


3 50 


130 00 


60 75 


2 50 


48 00 


29 00 


32 00 


10 00 


130 58 


72 54 


206 96 


43 50 


2 50 



3,860 73 



Clothing Concluded. 



Buckles 

'M gross buttons, at 25c 

4 lb. shoe buttons, at $1 .50* 

56 yds. canvas, heavy, at 45c 

200 yds. canvas, coat, at Kic 

2 chamois skins, at $] 

1 chest measure 

10 pis. cork soles, at 25c 

496 j yds. cotton 

2 boxes crayons, tailors, at $1 .25. . 

10 gross eyelets, at 50c 

-j doz. feather dusters, at .$14 

1 doz. hafts, awl 

2 pi's, hair-clippers, at $7 

121g yds. hair cloth, at 37^c 

6 hammers, at 65c 

28 doz. handkerchiefs, at $3 

44 doz. hats, straw, at $1 . 50 

1 heelshave 

212 yds. Italian cloth, at 75c 

4 kit lamps, at 80c 

1 leather patching machine 

67 ft. leather Canadian buff, at 25c . 

19 lbs. do harness, at 30c 

114^ lbs. leather pebble, at 25c . 



134 lbs. do 
1128 lbs. do 
3624 lbs. do 
20 sq.ft. do 
135^ yds. linen, 



California sole, at 40 . 

B. C. sole, at 30c 

B. C. upper, at 60c . . 

welt, at 25c 

Forfar, at 25c 



43| yds. linen, French, at 25c. . 
130 yds. lining, fancy, at 25c . . . 

3 lining, shoe, at $1 

6 doz. prs. mitts, at $5.50 

nails, brass, at 40c 

do Hungarian, at 15c. 

iron, at 14c 

channel, at 40c. . . . 
channel, at 35c. . . . 



do 
do 
do 



12 



38 lbs. 
57 lbs. 
40 lbs. 
6 lbs. 

6 lbs. 

Needles 

14 galls, oil, sperm, $4 

Packing 

5 reams paper, pattern 

7 reams paper wrapping 

3 reams locks, at 60c 

l^lbs. rivets, at $1.40 

1 quire sand-paper 

3 sewing machines, at $70 

Sharpening shears 

1 doz. shears, tailors 

3J gross shoe hooks, at 75c 

Shoemaker varnish, etc 

2 galls, shoe pegs, at 25c 

1954 yds. silesia, at 25c 

2834 yds. silesia, at 20c 

7 skins, Canadian calf, at $1 

22 lbs. skin Canadian kip, at 85c . . 
58| lbs. skin, French calf, at $1.60. 

6 skins, French kid, at $2.75 

24 lbs. skin, French kip, at $1.40. . 

f doz. skins, sheep, at $15 

14 doz. skins, sheep, at $10.50 

1 gross steel shanks 

9 lbs. shoe tacks 

2 thermometers, at $2 

9 gross, cotton spools, at $5.75. . . . 

2 doz. linen spools, at $4.20 

9 lbs. shoe thread, at $1.25 

14 doz. spools silk thread, $12 

1594 yds. towelling, at 124c 

34 doz. towels 

7 



s cts. 

2 40 
'.i 25 

75 
25 20 

32 oo 
2 00 
5 00 
2 50 

47 81 

2 50 

5 00 

3 50 

1 00 

14 00 
45 51 

3 90 
84 oo 

6 75 

1 50 
159 00 

3 20 

75 00 
36 75 

5 70 

28 62 

53 SO 

338 40 

217 50 

5 00 

33 81 

10 94 

32 50 

3 00 

33 00 

15 20 
8 55 

5 60 

2 40 
2 10 

11 35 

6 00 

50 
49 40 
31 00 

1 80 

2 10 
50 

210 00 
75 

19 75 
2 50 

11 47 
50 

48 87 

76 70 

7 00 
18 70 
93 20 

16 50 
33 00 
11 25 
15 75 

6 00 

7 15 

4 00 
51 75 

8 40 
11 25 

18 00 

19 94 

20 30 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18) 



No. 21. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892- 



4. 1893 

■Continued. 



Cloth ing — Concluded. 



Tanning 

2 lbs. twine, at $1.10 

Twist machine 

12 lbs. wax, bees, at 75c . . 
6J lbs . wax, shoe, at 35c. . 
h gross webbing, at $3.50: 
156 lbs. yarn, at 60c 



Convicts' Travelling Allowance. 



1 convict. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



at $12.50. 
at 15.00. 
at 17.50. 



Discharge Cloth ing. 



186^ yds. canvas, at 16c. 

14 collars, at 25c 

14 hats, felt 

195§ yds. flannel 

I85 yds. Italian cloth . . . 

14 neckties, at 25c 

212^ yds. tweed, at 70c. . 



Bedding. 



1 bedstead 

150 yds. canvas, at 45c 

2 doz. counterpanes, at $15 . 
1 mattress 



Chapels 



Organists' salaries 

1 bottle communion wine 

1 doz. hymn books 

20 hymn books, Chinese, at 25c. 



Library. 

141 hooks for Catholic library 

48 books for Protestant library 

1 B.C. Directory 

1 map of New Westminster 

Sub. !» nios. " Dailv Colonist," at $1. 
Sul). 12 inos. " Columbian," at $1. . . . 



School. 



6 doz. slates, at 



12d. 



date pencils, ;it 



Escapes. 



1 doz. 1 plates 

{ doz. I plates, at $1 . 
1 doz. cabinet plates. . . 
1 roll printing paper 

camera 

I developing, h photos 

Travelling expenses, pd. ( ruard Quilt} 



for- detective 



$ cts. 



18 00 


2 20 


109 83 


9 00 


2 27 


1 75 


93 60 



2,418 86 



267 50 



29 

3 

29 

72 

13 

3 

118 



301 09 



106 75 



100 

1 
1 
5 



107 00 



170 96 



21 00 



Escapes — Concluded. 

Travelling expenses,, pd. Guard Jackson 
do do Smyth., 

do do McNiven 

do do Stewart . 



Hospital. 



3 lbs. acet. scillse, at 10c ... 

f lbs. acid boracic, at 15c 

5 oz. antipyrine, at $2.25 

2 rolls antiseptic gauze, at $2.25.. . 
10 lbs. aqua amon. fort, at 12c .... 

2 lbs. barley, pearl 

h gall. bay. rum, at $6 

4 doz. .Johnston's fluid beef, at $6. 
1 bottle beef, iron and wine 

3 j galls, benzine, at 25c 

If lbs. bismuth carb. , at $8 

1 bottle black draught 

24 doz. bottles 

1 arm. atropia sulphas 

6 stock bottles, at 50c 

20 doz. nests boxes, chip, at 12|c. 
h doz. nests boxes, pill, at 25c 

2 brushes, at $5.50 

2 oz. cam ph. salol, at $1.50 

4 lbs. cas. sagrada, at 75c 

2 lbs. chloroform, at $1.75. ..... . 

10 lbs. chloride of lime, at 7c 

rj doz. chlorodine C.B., at $6 

1 oz. codia 

5 gro. corks, at 20c 

If lbs. cotton, absorb., at $2 

1 box courtplasters 

16 lbs. crackers, at 7c 

\ lb. creosote, at $1.60 

7 galls, cod liver oil 

i gall, olive oil, at $1.50 

1 gall, oil morrhua 

100 pil. antipyrene, at 4c 

100 pil. camph. mono., at 2c 

500 pil. cath. co 

3 bx. pil. Cockle's, at 75c 

10 doz. pil. quin. sulph., at 20c. . . 

1 doz. bottles porter 

2 lbs. pot. bitart, at 30c 

1 lb. pot. chlor 

1 lb. pot. chlor. tablets 

2 oz. quinine, at 40c 

1 oz. quin. sulph 

8 oz. rhei pulv, at 31 ^c 

3 lbs. sal. Rochelle, at $1 

10 lbs. salts, Epsom, at 5c 

1 bottle sarsaparilla 

1 box silicon 

2 bars soap, at $1.50 

9 cakes soap, acid carb., at 20c. . . 
74 lbs. soap, castile, at 9c 

3 boxes soap, cuticura, at $1.05. . 
h doz. soap, Pear's, at $3 

6 lbs. soda bicarb, at 15c 

1 do salicylate 

2 prs. spectacles, at $2.50 

7fj lbs. sponges, at 75c 

4 lbs. spr. camph. co., 

4 do ether nitr. , at 70c 

2 stockings, silk elastic, at $3 

1 roll sul). gauze 

70 11 >s. sulphur, at 4c 



128 



15 lhs. sulph. magnesia, at 20c. . . . 

10 syringes 

3 bottles syrup, Fellow's, at $1.50. 
1 lb. syrup ferri iodid 



Department of Justice. 



No. 27. — Details of Expenditure for the Yearendei 30th June, 1892 — Continued- 



Hospital — Concluded. 

\ do/., bottles syrup of figs, at $0. 

13 lbs. syrup simplex, at 50c 

I ll)s. taraxicum fid. ex., at $2. . . 

benzoin, at 60c 

calumba, at 20c 

do card, co 

campli. co., at 40c 

fern, mur., at 20c 

gent, co., at 35c 

mix vomica 

opii, at 75c 

opii camph. co., at 40c. . 

rhci co 

senega, at 50c 

senna, at $1.25 

tolu, at $1.50 

zingiber 



lbs. tr 

do 

do 

2 do 

2 do 

\ do 
1 do 

3 do 

4 do 

1 do 

3 do 

2 do 
2 do 

1 do 

15 bottles triturates, Wyeth's, at $1. 
.') trusses 

5 o/.s. ung. pat. iodid, 50c 

'.I lbs. vaseline, at 20c 

2 bottles Witch Hazel ex., at 50c. . . 

12 do/., eggs, at 15c 

11 emp. bellad 

10 bottles fruit salts, at $1 . 

3 ozs. ferri et quin. cum strych., 75c. 

Fruits 

10 lbs. glycerine, at 75c 

2 graduates, at 75c 

10 lbs. gum camph. at 85c 

3 bottles hydrangia, at $2 

1 o/.. hyd. sub. chlor 

4 ozs. iodoform, at $1 

li rolls isinglass plaster, at $1 

!) bottles lactopeptine, at $1 

2 lbs. lin. aconite, at $2 

2 do belladon., at $2 

11 do saponis, at $1 

lib lint 

\ doz. lith. hydrangia, at $24 

36 lbs. meal, linseed, at Gc 

350 lbs. meal, oat, at 4c 

20 lbs. mutton, at 12ic 



cts. 

50 
50 

on 
20 
60 
to 
80 
Id 
40 
00 
25 
60 
50 
50 
50 
no 
65 
00 
00 
00 
80 
oo 
so 

42 

00 
25 
05 
50 
50 
50 
00 

10 

00 

00 
00 

00 

00 
00 
55 

00 

50 
00 
50 



Total for maintenance. 
Heating 



174, ! tons coal, at $0 

1 door and frame for bake-oven 

180 lbs. grate bars 

1 doz. pokers 1 

- stoves | 

1 Btoveback [ 

140 lbs. stoveback castings, at 15c 

; . doz. tongs, at $6 



387 
7,662 



83 



07 



Light. 

'•"Kails, eoal oil, at 22c. 
662,900 ft. gas 

I doz. lanterns 

II gross matches, at 50c. 
24 bundles wicks, at 10c. 



1,048 50 
7 30 
40 
50 
50 
25 
oo 
00 



1,125 45 



Repairs to Bid/dings. 

1 boiler and cover 

Brushes, J)amt and whitewash. 
Butts and hinges 



6 

1,937 

13 

5 

9 



1,965 05 



Repairs to Buildings Concluded. 



( 'ement and lime 

1 east in n door front 

Piles, assorted 

Furniture furnishings 

Glass 

80 lbs. glue 

1 heater coil 

Locks and keys 

Lumber 

Methylated spirits 

Nails and spikes 

Oil, linseed 

Oil sperm 

Plumbing and gas fitting 

Piping, valves and unions 

25 padlocks 

Paint 

Patent driers 

82 lbs. putty, at 5c 

Repairing bake-oven 

Repairing furnace and boiler- 

Roof plate and cap 

30 lbs. rope, at 20c 

Sand-paper and emery cloth 

41 gross screws 

1 sink 

1 steel tape 

48 pkgs. tacks 

Tar 

Tools for carpenter and blacksmith shop? 

Tracing cloth and drawing pins 

30 galls, turpentine 

Twdne 

Varnish and shellac 

2 water closets 

Whiting 

Wire 

Zinc, lead and solder 



Armour 1/ . 



1 cap extractor 

Caretaking 

2,400 cartridges 

1 Dominion flag 

2 lbs. powder, at $1. 

000 shells, cartridge. 
2 sacks shot 

1 shotgun 

1 box wads 



129 



Kitchen. 



7 bake-pans 

1 doz. bath-bricks 

25 lbs. blueing, at 10c 

4 boilers, at $9 

4 doz. brooms, at $3 

59 buckets, galvanized 

4 doz. buckets, wooden, at $4.50. 

8 butcher knives 

1 carpet-sweeper 

doz. clothespins, at 5c 

h doz. dusters, at $14 

2 frying-pans, at 00c 

1 sheet galvanized iron 

\ doz. ladles, at $2.50 

144 lbs. lye 

2 meat saws, at $3.25 

1 set meat scales 

1 doz. mop-handles 

Piping, bends, elbows, &c 



s cts. 

73 50 

50 
2 40 

13 14 

28 50 

23 oo 
15 00 

11 2'A 
52!) 52 

10 00 
98 25 
43 70 

1 oo 
17:» oi 

39 33 

17 50 

112 35 

4 40 

4 10 

60 oo 

12 20 

2 50 
6 00 

14 40 

24 50 
6 oo 

11 50 

4 80* 

5 00 
62 90 

5 30 

29 00 
4 20 

45 75 

17 50 

54 50 

!) 30 

17 91 

2,033 72 



25 

24 00 

69 40 

23 00 

2 00 

7 05 

4 00 

75 00 

75 



205 45 



3 00 

3 00 
2 50 

36 00 
12 oo 
69 90 
18 00 
10 10 

5 50 

30 
7 00 

1 80 
1 50 
1 25 

23 04 

6 50 
12 00 

4 50 

7 85 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 18.) A. 1893 

No. 27. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Continued. 



Kitchen — Concluded. 

2 galls, pipe varnish, at 75c 

Repairing boiler 

50 lbs. sal soda 

3 sauce-pans 

1 doz. scrubbing-brushes 

1 doz stove-brushes 

2 sieves, at 75c 

500 lbs. soap, at 4c 

6 doz. soup-dishes, at $3 

1 steamer 

1 steel sink 

\ gross stove polish, at 50c 

4 doz. strainers, at $2.50 

6 doz. table knives, at $4.50 

12| doz. table spoons, at $1.50 

15 sheets tin, at 20c 

6 doz. tin cups, at $1.50 

25jt doz. toilet paper 

4 wall-brushes 

4 water-sprinklers, at 65c 

9 doz. water-tins 

10 doz. whisks, at $1 

1 wringer 

14 lbs. zinc, at 12^c 

12 doz. tin plates 

Stationery. 

1 case 

2 baskets, paper 

Farm. 

\ doz. axes, at $15 

2 tons barley 

4 barrels, at $1.12J 

6 baskets, at $1 

6,200 lbs. bran 

36 lbs. chain, at 8c 

6 doz. handles, axe and pick, at $4.50 
h doz. hay forks, at $!) 

15 loads manure, at 50c 

1^ doz. manure forks 

3 sets maul rings, at $1 

66 feet oak lumber, at 13c 

8 plough points, at 75c 

Powder, fuse, etc 

.', doz. rakes, at $7 

248 lbs. rope, at 18c 

1 doz. scythe stones 

2 doz. sections for mower 

Seeds 

Service of bull 

2 tons shorts 

1 single-tree 

300 ft. vitrified drain pipe, at 29c. . . . 
60 wagon spokes, at 15c 



$ cts. 

1 50 

1 25 

2 50 
7 25 

15 00 

5 50 
1 50 

20 00 

18 00 

4 00 

3 50 

25 

1 25 
27 00 
18 75 

3 00 

9 00 

88 08 

6 50 

2 60 
23 25 
10 00 
10 00 

1 75 
9 90 

517 67 



50 
2 50 



3 00 



7 50 

73 75 

4 50 

6 00 
88 00 

2 88 
27 00 

4 50 

7 50 
13 75 

3 00 

8 58 
6 00 

86 75 
3 50 

44 64 

1 50 

8 25 
61 41 

2 00 
71 25 

75 

87 00 

9 00 



Farm — Concluded. 



50 lbs. wheat, at 2^c 

I doz. wheelbarrows, at $25. 



Stables. 

3 doz. axle grease, at $3 

550 lbs. barley, at 2|c 

i ton bran 

1 tin harness oil 

1 breast plate 

1 collar 

1 set harness, single 

1 pair horse clippers 

2 horse rasps, at $1 

2 pipe cutter rollers, at 50c . . . . 
llf lbs. rubber packing, at 50c 

2 rugs, at $4.50 

\ ton shorts, at $37.50 

3 doz. fire bolts, at 12c 

3 doz. waggon bolts, at 25c. . . . 
1 whip 



Furniture. 
20 yds. damask, at $1 ... . 



Total for working expenses . 

Miscellaneous. 



Telegrams 

Postage 

Freight charges. 
Express charges . 

Advertising 

Telephone 

Wharf 

Queen's Printer. 
Stationery Office. 



Industries, 

Cocks, valves, &c 

4,075 lbs. Cumberland coal, at lfc 

2h kegs, horse-shoe, at $9 

15 lbs. horse-shoe nails, at 15c. . . . 

Iron 

Steel '. 

Tools for blacksmish shop 

Tools for carpenter shop 

Grand Total 



$ cts. 

1 25 
12 50 



642 76 



9 00 
12 37 

17 50 

75 

4 00 

5 00 
36 00 

2 25 

2 00 

1 00 
5 87 
9 00 j 

18 751 
36 
75 

3 00 1 



127 601 



20 00 



6,640 7(1 



90 3( 
44 01 
27 U 
6 5(| 
51 0i ' 

84 m 

1,379 6< 
74 8 
55 2 

1,812 el 



8 

71 
22 

2 

135 

15 

44 ( 

46 ( 



346 ( 

36,626 ■ 



130 



Department of Justice. 

\ T ( >. 27. — Details of Expenditure for the Year ended 30th June, 1892 — Concluded. 

RECAPITULATION. 



off : 
Salaries. . 
Uniforms. 

laintenanct : 



Stations 

Clothing 

Travelling allowance 
Discharge clothing. . . 

Bedding 

Chapels 

Libraries 

School 

Escapes 

Hospital 



'orking Expenses : 

Heating 

Light 

Repairs to buildings. 

Armoury 

Kitchen 

Stationery 

Farm 

Stables 

Furniture 



sedlaneous : 

Telegrams 

Postage 

Freight charges. . 
Express charges. 

Advertising 

Telephone 

Wharf 

Queen's Printer. . 
Stationery Office. 

ilustritx : 
Sundries 



Refunded by warden 



Total. 



Grand Total. 



19,915 26 

1 1 » 12 



3,860 ?:'. 

2,418 86 
267 :><> 
30] on 

IOC) 75 
107 00 
171 76 
21 00 
20 15 
387 83 



1,125 45 

1,065 05 

2,033 72 

205 45 

517 67 

3 00 

642 76 

127 60 

20 00 



90 30 
44 00 
27 16 
6 50 
51 00 
84 00 
1,379 60 
74 84 
55 27 



$ cts. 



20,329 68 



7,662 (57 



6,640 70 



1,812 67 

346 04 

36,791 76 
80 00 

36,711 76 



131 



5G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 18.) 

No. 28. 



Balance Sheet, British Columbia Penitentiary, for Fiscal Year ended 
Dr. 30th June, 1892. Cr. 



Buildings 

Land 

Fencing 

Tailor shop 

Sundries 

Farm 

Store room 

Wing 

Shoe shop 

Stables 

Catholic chapel 

Armoury 

Warden's residence 

Deputy warden's quarters . 

Wash house 

Blacksmith shop 

Hospital 

Accountant's office 

Protestant chapel 

Carpenter's shop 

Halls 

Convict's kitchen 

Warden's office 

Bakery 

Lamp room 

Steward's office. 

Guards' room 

Womans' department 

Guards' quarters 

Officers' dining room . . . 
Meat room 



To Balance. 



cts. 



217,511 00 


89,500 00 


9,750 00 


4,246 Gl 


2,939 00 


2,682 10 


2,548 22 


2,230 20 


1,335 92 


1,257 10 


1,104 26 


1,028 05 


1,003 25 


984 75 


968 85 


850 51 


753 30 


655 25 


615 50 


583 06 


372 25 


332 70 


162 80 


128 10 


122 60 


95 40 


57 65 


48 95 


47 45 


40 95 


31 00 


343,986 78 


343,986 78 




343,980, 



132 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 1893 

DEPARTMENT 



OF 



MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



OF THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA, 



REPORT 



FOR THE 



HALF-YEAR ENDED 30th JUNE, 1892 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT. 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE QUEEN'S MOST 
EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1893 

[No. 19—1892.] Jfrice 5 cents. 



'! 



Militia and Defence. 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley, Baron 
Stanley of Preston, in the County of Lancaster, in the Peerage of the United 
Kingdom, Knight Grand Gross of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, 
Governor- General of Canada. 

My Lord, — 

I have the honour to forward to Your Excellency the accompanying Report of 
the Department of Militia and Defence of the Dominion of Canada for the half-year 
ended 30th June, 1892, which is respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, 

My Lord, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 



J. C. PATTERSON, 
Minister of Militia and Defence. 



Department op Militia and Defence, 

Ottawa, 15th December, 1892. 



Militia and Defence. 



CONTENTS OF REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE. 



HALF-YEAR ENDED 30™ JUNE, 1892. 



Page, 
kpoet of the deputy minister of mllitia and defence : 

Present report, to end of fiscal year only ' \ ii 

General Officer Commanding, Report of vii 

Changes made in organization, &c, of Permanent Forces vii 

Other measures of improvement suggested vii 

("amps being held later in the year, those operations not in present report vii 

Cartridge Factory, changes in machinery, may be required vii 

Ammunition manufactured during half-year viii 

Revenue obtained from Militia sources viii 

Estimates, proportionate increase recommended , viii 

Financial statement for fiscal year 1891-92 viii 

lppbndix No. 1 to Report of the Deputy Minister. 

Report of the General Officer Commanding the Militia: — 

Present report supplementary, being to 30th June only 1 

Returns submitted as Appendices, list of I 

Permanent Forces, Return of personnel (Appendix A) ] 

Discipline, comparison with previous year (Appendix B) . . . 2 

Schools of Instruction, increased activity in (Appendix C) 2 

Permanent Corps, development of regimental organization in 2 

do do higher education of Officers again recommended 2 

do do Medals (Imperial) for long service and good conduct 2 

Active Militia, measures taken towards increased efficiency 2 

Inspections, instructions as to manner of carrying out 2 

Competition, system of, established 2 

Absence without leave from inspection, check upon 2 

Prizes for efficiency offered by Sir Donald Smith 2 

do in other Districts, hoped for 2 

Training in 1892-93, number provided for 2 

do Comparison of numbers with two past years 3 

do cost of, remarks on 3 

do do transport, &c. , of Rural Militia 3 

Organization, of Military Districts, changes in 3 

' Staff, changes should be carried out 3 

Active Militia, regimental reorganization 3 

do separation of the two categories 3 

( llothing, issues, absence of system in 3 

Money allowance to city Corps recommended 3 

Volunteer system, United Kingdom, referred to 3 

Equipment, condition worse than before represented 4 

Saddlery issued, unfit for use . . 4 

Boots " do do 4 

Material, Field Artillery, bad state of 4 

Arms, most suitable new rifle, enquiry respecting. 4 

Ammunition produced by Cartridge Factory, remarks upon 4 

Rifle Ranges, not servicable for modern rifles 4 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 189: 

PA<j 

Appendix No. 1 to Report of the Deputy Minister — Concluded. 

Report of the General Officer Commanding the Militia — Concluded. 

Stores, system of issue to the Militia, objected to 

Purchase should be vested in civil branch 

Custody, inspection and issue, in military executive. . . 

Store-houses inspected, report upon 

Store Branch, reorganization urged 

Workshops, military, in each District advocated 

Ordnance, obsolete, should be disposed of 

New, should be obtained with the proceeds 

Barrack accommodation, Winnipeg, now provided 

Kingston, sanitary condition bad 

Works, defensive, old, plans for utilization of 

Staff reorganization, again recommended 

Appendices to Report of the General Officer Commanding : — 

A. — Permanent Corps, Return of 

B. — Courts Martial in Permanent Corps, Return of 

C. —Cavalry, Artillery and Infantry Schools, number of Officers, &c. , who have 

qualified in 

D. — Local Headquarters, number of Officers and Men of City Corps trained at. 

E. — Inspection Report of Corps included in Appendix D 10 i 

F.— Royal Military College of Canada, Commandant's Report ] 

Appendix No. 2 to Report of the Deputy Minister: — 

Director of Stores, Report of 

A. — S. A. ammunition issued for practice, 1st Jan. to 30th June, 1892 

B. — do on repayment, do do 

C. — Gunpowder, &c, issuedforpractice and salutes, do do 

D. — Ordnance in possession of Militia and in Store charge on the 30th June, 1892. 34 ;- 

Appendix No. 3 to Report of the Deputy Misister : - 

Engineer Branch, Architect's Report 4 

Appendix No. 4 to Report of the Deputy Minister: — 

( Jartridge Factory, Superintendent's Report -I 



VI 



Militia and Defence. 



REPORT 



Of THE 



DEPUTY MINISTER 



Department of Militia and Defence, 

Ottawa, 14th December, 1892. 

Sir, — The present report on the administration of the Department of Militia and 

fence, to the 30th June last, is a report on six months' operations only. The Depart- 

n of Militia and Defence was the only Department, the yearly report of which ran 

■ h the calendar year to the 31st December, all the other branches of the Government 

orting for the fiscal year ending on the 30th June. Great inconvenience, and delays 

isons for which were not generally understood, arose from the impossibility of 

paring and closing up returns until the calendar year was ended, the subsequent 

ig and revision of proofs still further retarding the issue of the report. It has 

ore been thought advisable, with your sanction, to adopt the course pursued in the 

r Departments of the public service. In future, it is hoped that our report will be 

at a very much earlier period. 

The report of the General Officer Commanding will be found of great interest, deal- 
ill as it does with matters of importance to the well-being and further development of 
Militia system. Upon previous recommendations of Major General Herbert, several 
es have already been made in the organization and regulations of the Permanent 
. tending to bring these Corps up to the standard of efficiency that all bodies of 
foliar soldiers should attain. Other measures are now suggested, for improvement in 
I different branches of the service, and they will come up for your consideration as 
h preliminary considerations are matured. 

The greater part of the operations of the training of the Militia in camp during 
; year 1892 took place after the 30th June; and I very much regret that, for this 
. the present departmental report is devoid of much of the usual interest and 
u.ility attached to those operations. 

Should it be decided to introduce an improved rifle for the arming of the Militia, 

- ae changes will be necessitated in the machinery of the Cartridge Factory. With the 

• lit ion of one or two machines, however, and some changes in the existing plant, the 

munition for the improved weapon can be promptly turned out at the Factory. I 

lorn the Report of the Director of Stores (see page 28), that existing requirements, 

'jth as regards small arm ammunition and shell, were fully met by the Factory, besides 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 18! 

the reserve in magazine charge being added to. Of the Martini-Henry ammunition nc 
produced at the Factory, a quarter of a million rounds were turned out during the 
year ; and it will be observed from the Superintendent's report (Appendix No. 4 heret 
that the output for the year 1892, of small arm ammunition, will not fall far short of U 
million rounds. This ammunition has been tested, and has given the greatest satisfactic 

I have the honour to report, as regards financial matters, that in some cases 
amounts voted by Parliament were found to be insufficient for the requirements of tl 
service, and. in consequence an increase will now be necessary. 

Although the Department of Militia and Defence is not supposed to add much 
the general revenue of the Dominion, it will be seen by referring to the report of 
Director of Stores (Appendix No. 2) that during the fiscal year the amount of $20,125. 
was deposited to revenue. The whole of the amount, except $4,450.78 paid in forrei 
represents moneys deposited to the credit of the Receiver General for the purchase j 
ammunition, military stores and clothing. These purchases are of constant occurren! 
and are on the increase. This amount, therefore, is equivalent to a refund of just so mi 
of the money that had been voted for the Militia, and our Estimates, may therefore! 
considered as practically curtailed to that extent. I would also beg to point out thai 
large amount of the Vote for the Royal Military College is likewise recouped in the sal 
way, by deposits to revenue made by Cadets, amounting this year to the sum of $18,679. 
In view of these facts, I would respectfully recommend that a proportionate increz 
allowed in the Estimates, in order that the Militia service may receive the full value 
the money which it is the intention to vote for its maintenance and development. 

The Militia expenditure for 1891-92 was as follows : — 

Militia Expenditure, 1891-92. 

Salaries, Head Quarter staff $ 6,600 00 

District staff.: '. . . 10,983 32 

Brigade Majors 13,684 SO 

Royal Military College. « 63,949 31 

Ammunition, clothing and stores 191,403 03 

Public Armouries and care of arms 59,884 52 

I )rill pay and camp purposes 251,125 70 

Drill instruction 36,314 15 

Contingencies 38,882 38 

Dominion of Canada Rifle Association 10,000 00 

" Artillery Association 2,000 00 

Drill sheds, rifle ranges and military properties 31,370 12 

( lonstruction and repairs 63,680 79 

Permanent ForceSj Cavalry, Artillery and Infantry; 

.Hid Schools of .Military Instruction 479,166 38 

Monuments, Battle fieldsdf Canada 50 00 

Expenses, formation and drill of a new Kilted Battalion 

at. Toronto 5,000 00 

viii 



Militia and Defence. 

Provincial rifle range, Sussex, N.B $ 500 00 

Improved rifled ordnance 1,713 55 

Ordinary Militia expenditure $1,266,308 05 

North-west service (Rebellion 1885) 3,956 47 

$1,270,264 52 

Pensions, 1891-92. 

War of 1812 and subsequent service, down to 1839 

(Upper Canada) $ 2,720 00 

Annual grant to surviving veterans 1812-15 540 00 

Active service (Fenian Raids, &c.) 3,147 50 

Rebellion, N.W.T., 1885 20,604 45 

$ 27,011 95 

Revenue, 1891-92. 

Casual revenue $ 163 29 

Extra ammunition $ 11,722 27 

Stores and clothing 3,969 14 

Miscellaneous , 1,556 59 

Rents, military properties 4,450 78 

21,698 78 

$ 21,862 07 

Royal Military College 18,679 62 

$ 40,541 69 

Number of Pensioners, 1891-92. 

War of 1812 and subsequent service, down to 1839 

(Upper Canada) 32 

Surviving Veterans, 1812, receiving an annual grant.. 18 

Active service (Fenian Raids, &c.) 20 

Rebellion, N.W.T., 1885 104 

174 



The report of Lieutenant White, Acting Architect in the absence through illness 

of Mr. James, which report will be found in Appendix No. 3, calls for no special 

ix 
19— B 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



A. 18931 



comment. The duties which have devolved upon Lieutenant White have been ver 
efficiently performed, and he has here given in detail an account of the works of repai 
and maintenance of Militia buildings that have been carried on under the Enginee 
branch of the Department. 

I have the honour to be, sir, ** 

Your obedient servant. 



C. EUG. PANET, Colonel, 
Deputy Minister of Militia and Defence. 



The Honourable 

The Minister of Militia and Defence. 



Militia and Defence. 



AITKXDIX No. 1 



TO 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



OF 



MILITIA AND DEFENCE. 



Half-year ended 30th June, 1892. 



{EPORT OF THE GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING THE MILITIA. 

Headquarters, Ottawa, 30th November; 1892. 

The Honourable 

The Minister of Militia and Defence. 

Sir, — It having been decided, that in future the report of the Department of 
►tiiitia and Defence shall extend over the whole period comprised within the fiscal 
7ear closing on the 30th June annually, I have the honour to submit the following 
is a supplement to the report, which was published under date of the 31st 
December, 1891. 

I do not propose to deal herein with matters other than those affected by 
•ircumstances, which may have occurred within the fiscal period extending from 
he 30th June, 1891, to the 30th June, 1892 ; consequently the details and results of 
he Militia training, for which provision was made in the estimates for 1892-93, 
lave been omitted, and will form the subject of a future report. 

I submit herewith the following enclosures: — 

1. Annual return of Permanent Corps of Active Militia. (Appendix A.) 

2. Return of convictions by Court-martial. (Appendix B.) 

3. Return of Officers, non-commissioned officers and men who have obtained 
ertiricates of qualification at the Schools of Military Instruction. (Ap- 
)endix C.) 

4. Supplementary return of Officers and men drilled at local Headquarters in 
'-891-92. (Appendix D.) 

5. Inspection report of the Corps included in Appendix D. (Appendix E.) 

H. The report of the Commandant of the Royal Military College. (Ap- 
)endix F.) 

The first of these returns (Appendix A) deals with the personnel of the 
Permanent Force on the same principle as was adopted in my former report. A 
■ine has been added to show the increase and decrease, under each heading, during 
jhe past year, as compared with the, preceding one. 
1 J— 1 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 1893 j 

Appendix B shows an increase of 33 in the number of crimes dealt with by 
Court-martial. This increase is almost entirely in one Corps — "B " Troop, Canadianj 
Dragoons, at Winnipeg — which shows an increase of 25 cases tried by Court-martial,) 
of which 12 occurred within the first two months of its organization. This fact 
shows clearly the low ebb to which discipline had been allowed to fall in the! 
" Mounted Infantry," from which this Troop was formed. The general increase of] 
military crime is directly traceable to the same cause, viz., laxity of discipline' 
in the past, and inequality in the manner of enforcing it. 

Appendix C gives evidence of increased activity in the Schools of Military 
Instruction. The returns for the year 1891 show that during the twelve months of 
that year 304 Officers, N. C. Officers and men attended those Schools and obtained; 
various certificates of qualification. Those now published show that in the first. six 
months of the year 1892 that total was exceeded, and 312 certificates were granted. 
As extra courses of instruction were organized this year, to be carried out in thej 
months of July, August and September, there is reason to expect that the second! 
six months of the year will yield equally satisfactory results. 

A step has been taken towards remedying the defects of organization in th(J 
Permanent Force, to which I referred in my previous report, by incorporating tluj 
four Companies of Infantry into a Regiment, with the title of the " Canadian Regis 
ment of Infantry," and by similarly connecting the two Troops of Cavalry, undej; 
the title of the " Canadian Dragoons." The future development of the Regimenta 
system, will make it possible to secure greater uniformity in drill, administra 
tion, and in the standard of instruction, imparted at the Schools of Militan 
Instruction. 

There is much yet to be done to bring this small Force up to the level of th» 
important duties devolving upon it. I regret that it has not been found possibl 
to give effect to my recommendations, tending towards the higher education of th< 
Officers, and I submit these again for your favourable consideration. The Officers ok 
the Permanent Force must be professional soldiers, and to attain that charactei 
they must devote themselves to the serious study of the profession they bav 
adopted. They have little to look forward to in the way of material advantaged 
and they have therefore the more right to expect, that the means be provided t 
them for that education, by which alone they can become fitted, to perform efficienth 
their duties as instructors of the Militia. 

The Imperial Government has expressed its willingness to confer medals, fol 
long service and good conduct, on non-commissioned officers and men of the Peij 
manent Force, under conditions similar to those governing such rewards in th! 
regular Army. I trust that means will be found to carry this desire into effecj 
Such a distinction would be highly prized, and could not fail to be productive < 
excellent results. 

ACTIVE MILITIA. 

In my previous report I attributed the lack of efficiency of a considerable paij 
of the Active Militia to deficient inspection. Instructions have now been issued as tj 
I he manner in which inspections are to be carried out, a system of competition hi| 
been established, and measures have been taken lo check absence without leave froi 
inspection. This practice has grown into a serious abuse, in certain city Corps » 
.Militia, and if permitted to continue, must render abortive any attempt to raitj 
the standard of efficiency in those Corps. I have pleasure in reporting thatthrouj 
the generosity of Sir Donald A. Smith, K.C.M.G., prizes for efficiency have be( 
offered for competition in No. 5 Military District, on the same principle as tho 1 
established by Sir Casimir Grzowski, K.C.M.G., A.D.C., in No. 2 District. I am fu 
ther encouraged in the hope of seeing similar prizes instituted in the other Militai 
Dial riots of I be Dominion. 

Arrangements have been made for the training in 1892-93 of 21,484 men of I 
ranks of the Active Militia. 






Militia ;m<l Defence. 



The following comparative statement shows the numbers for which provision 
made in the two preceding years : — 



\ nil 



L890-91. 1891-92. 



Cfcvalrj 

Field Artillery 

Garrison Artillery. 

Enjfineers 

[nfantry 



1,233 
1,360 

L8,036 
20,629 



L,186 
1,360 

17,778 



20,324 



1892-93. 



1,722 
L,360 

L8,402 



21,484 



The increase this year has been made principally in the Cavalry, which costs 
elatively about three times as much to train as the Infantry. Notwithstanding this 
ict, however, the average cost per man trained will not exceed, and will probably 
e less than in previous years. Nevertheless the cost of training the rural Militia 
8 main 8 at a figure for which neither the country nor the men receive full value. 
everal items of expenditure in connection with it, notably that of rail way transport, 
inquire to be dealt with by executive enactments, under the powers conferred by the 
|lilitia Act, 49 Vic, cap. 41, sects. 88, 89. 

ORGANIZATION. 

A considerable step has been taken in amending the organization of the Militia, 
y the alteration of the boundaries of several of the Military Districts. The old 
[ivisions, while adding to the cost of administration, were in certain cases so incon- 
enient, as to render any arrangements for mobilization impossible. Authority has 
eeu obtained for certain changes in the Staff of these Districts, and it is mo3t desir- 
ble, in the interest of economy and efficiency - , that they be carried out. 

It is an imperative necessity, that the .Regiments of Active Militia be likewise 
ubmitted to a process of administrative reorganization. I have already, in my 
aiiier report, pointed out the direction which this much-needed reform should take, 
'he two categories of Militia should be separated, and placed under regulations 
uitable to the conditions under which each performs its training. The establish- 
ment of each Corps shouid be fixed so as to answer to the conditions of the locality to 
fhich it belongs, and to the demands which may be made on it, both in time of peace 
nd in the event of emergency. At present these establishments are not based on 
ither tactical or administrative requirements. 

CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT. 

In my last report I drew attention to the unsatisfactory system, or more cor- 
lectly to the absence of system, governing the issue of clothing to the Militia, and I 
leeommended that, in the case of city Corps, the issue should be replaced by an 
[llowance in money, and that the Commanding Officers should be entrusted with 
esponsibility for the clothing of their Corps, subject to strict regulation and inspec- 
ion. The sole objection, which has been urged against the practical character of 
His proposal, is an alleged possible loss of uniformity. In once more urging it as the 
fnly satisfactory solution of the question, I desire to draw your attention to the fact 
hat two Battalions of the Canadian Militia at present procure the whole, and some 
ther Battalions a part of their clothing in this manner. We have further the 
■xample of upwards of 200,000 Volunteers in the United Kingdom, whose clothing, 
•rovided entirely under regimental arraugement, is found satisfactory by the mili- 



19— U 



56 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



A. 1891 



tary authorities and by the men themselves. The system, therefore, is one whicl 
has been subjected to a practical test. It has, moreover, met with universal su[ 
port from Commanding Officers of city Militia Corps, and the known capacity of th< 
gentlemen in business matters, appears to me to invest their opinion, on such 
subject, with considerable weight. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The condition of a large proportion of the equipment, in use in the Militia, il 
even worse than I have already represented. Not only is a great part of it wori; 
out with age, but much of that wnich is issued as new is of the worst possible quality 
I have seen saddlery and other equipment, when issued fresh from store, which faih 
to endure the ordinary usage of a twelve days' camp. I have seen boots, that had beei 
issued to soldiers, the leather of which had no more consistency than paper. 

The condition of the Artillery material, in possession of Field Batteries, is lik< 
wise worse than I had been led to believe. I have now personally inspected nearl 
all these Batteries, and I find that in many cases the carriages, which are of an ol'| 
pattern, could not be depended upon to bear the strain of heavy firing. In soi 
cases they require to be entirely renewed. . 

ARMS. 

An inquiry has been instituted, which is still proceeding, with a view to asceil 
taming the most suitable small-bore rifle and carbine with which to re-arm tl 
Militia. There are, however, two points of the highest importance, which have tj 
be considered in connection with this question. 

1st. The provision of Ammunition. 
There is at present a considerable reserve of Snider ammunition, and the suppl 
is maintained by the Dominion Cartridge Factory, which turns out an antiquat 
form of cartridge. In order to manufacture the ammunition required for a model 
small-bore rifle, considerable changes of machinery would be necessary, while tl 
smokeless compound which has taken the place of gunpowder, in the modern fii 
arm, could not be procured in Canada. 

2nd. The provision of Rifle Ranges. 

There is not more than one Eifle Eange in Canada, on which practice could 
carried out to the full effective range of a modern rifle. There are few that adm| 
of practice at a longer range than 600 yards, and many which are already consider* 
unsafe for practice, even with the Snider rifle. The existence of abundant means f<| 
practising rifle-shooting is as necessary a condition for attaining efficiency, as is 
possession of good weapons. The question of providing such means cannot, therefo 
be set aside when considering the advisability of arming the Militia with a ne| 
weapon. 

Whilst earnestly desiring to see the introduction of a better fire-arm, I cam 
but recognize, that it would be a fruitless expenditure, were modern weapons plac 
in the hands of the Militia, without due provision for the supply of ammunition tc 
used with them, or for the means of instructing the men in their use. 

STORES. 

The system under which clothing, arms, equipment and military stores are 
procured and issued to the Militia, appears to me open to very serious objection 

The responsibility for purchasing stores, making contracts, viewing the sto: 
furnished by contractors, as well as for their custody and final issue, is all vested 
one Office, regardless of the conflict of opposing interests, affected, by the perfor 
ance of duties of such widely different character. It would seem more in accorda 
with business principles to vest the responsibility for purchase and contracts in 
financial or civil branch of the Department, and give to the Military Executive 
duties of custody, inspection and issue. This would be more easy since the amo 
of stores (exclusive of obsolete and condemned articles) in possession of the Dep 
incut amounts to little more than an " expense store" calculated to meet the curr 
requirements of the Militia, but not providing for any reserve. 

4 



or 
emi 



Militia and Defence. 

I have recently, by your desire, inspected a number of the Militia Storehouses, 
bough theso do not fall within the regular sphere of my inspection. They are 
Ilea 1 with an accumulation of worn-out and worthless equipment, obsolete military 
tores, and condemned utensils, for the care of which an unnecessary number of men 
re employed. They are subject to no regular system of inspection, and there is no 
sonal responsibility established in respect to them. The defect would be 
edied by a readjustment of the duties of the Store Branch, such as I have 
ggested. The establishment of military workshops in connection with the Stores 
if each District, for repairing saddlery, harness, and other equipment, would effect 
I great saving from the waste which now occurs. 

I have caused a special inspection to be made of the Ordnance included in the 
•Return of Ordnance" (Report of Director of Stores, 1891, Appendix D). The 
result has been to show that the Department is in possession of a large amount of 
fttterial of no military value, but which, if disposed of as old metal, would realize a 
jonsiderable sum. I strongly recommend that this course be adopted, and that a 
special appropriation be obtained from Parliament, equivalent to the proceeds of 
<uch sale, to be expended in the purchase of modern Artillery material. 

BARRACKS AND WORKS. 

Acting upon the representations contained in my previous report, you have 
!uithorized the necessary steps to be taken, for providing the much-needed barrack 
'accommodation at Winnipeg, and there is every prospect that before the winter sets 
nthe buildings will be sufficiently advanced, to admit of the men at that station being 
suitably housed. The sanitary condition of other barracks, notably the T§te de Pont 
barracks at Kingston, leaves much to be desired. Disease traceable to defective 
sanitation is constantly present in those barracks. 

In dealing with defensive works, I have submitted to you plans for the utiliza- 
tion of certain old works, which have lost much of their defensive importance under 
the conditions of modern warfare. By utilizing them as I propose, they will 
ustify the expenditure necessary to maintain them, and the gradual obliteration of 
these national monuments will be stayed. 

STAFF. 

I venture to quote the following from my published report on the Militia : — 
" I am thoroughly convinced, that if the country is to receive an adequate return for 
its Militia expenditure, a reorganization of the Staff is necessary. The first step in that 
reorganization should be the more strict definition of the duties, and responsibilities, of the 
Major-General Commanding the Militia, on the principle contained in Her Majesty's 
Order in Council, appended to the Queen's Regulations for the Army. This should be 
followed by the distribution of the Staff, in such manner as to ensure the proper perfor-. 
miance of the duties and the maintenance of an efficient chain of responsibility J" 

I have submitted details of a scheme, for the reorganization of the Staff, by which 
I propose to gain economy in administration, combined with the systematic instruc- 
tion of Staff Officers in those important branches of their duty, which have been 
hitherto ignored. I venture to hope that this policy will be adopted by the Govern- 
ment as the basis of a policy of Militia reorganization. Until some such solid 
ifoundation is laid, the work of the Military Executive cannot produce any permanent 
leffect, and it will continue to be seriously hampered. Much useful work has thisyear 
been delayed, and the proposal, from which Hooked to obtain valuable aid, in dealing 
jwith the scheme of defence for the Dominion, has been necessarily set aside, in con- 
sequence of the difficulties arising, at the outset, from defective Staff organization. 
! I conclude this report by urging the adoption of this most necessary measure. 
Without it there will continue to exist in Canada, a condition of military impotence, 
for the defence of her territory, side by side with the outward semblance of a mili- 
tary body, devoid of the organization which constitutes the living spirit, and motive 
I power, of such a body. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

IVOR HERBERT, Major-General, 

Commanding Canadian Militia. 
5 



5G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



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Militia and Defence. 
(APPENDIX B.) 



Permanent Corps, Active Mtlitia, 



Return of Convictions by Courts Martial from 1st July, 1891, to 30th June, 1892. 



( lorps. 


Disgraceful conduct of a 
cruel, indecent or unna- 
tural kind. 


Offences against discipline, 
i.e., insubordination and 
insubordinate language. 


a 

0> 

CO 

0) 

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be 




i- 

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o 

o 
SB 

95 


+5 

H 


i 

u 

z 
Q 

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"cS 

1 


Keniaiks. 


< lanadian ( " A " Troop 




1 

5 
1 

2 


5 

8 
15 
14 

1 

8 
1 
5 
3 


3 

4 

1 

2 


1 
2 
4 
2 


3 
14 

7 
13 

8 


13 
33 
28 
29 

13 

• « 
4 

20 

13 


1 

: 70 

j 
i 

J 












( lanadian j " B " Battery 




1 
Artillery 1. " C " Battery 

Canadian ( No. 1 Com pany .... 




Regiment of I No. 2 Company. . . 

Infantry 1 No. 3 Company.. . . 

I No. 4 Company ... 

Total Crimes 

1X«)1-!)L> Total Crimes 

Increase 


1 


5 


1 


3 

1 


3 

10 
4 


1 


14 60 

J 


11 


13 


02 


101 




3 


25 42 


7 


9 


42 


128 








18 


4 


4 


20 


33 




Decrease 




* 9 


2 








... .* 







WALKER POWELL, Colonel, 

Adjudant-General, 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 19.) 



A. 1892 



(APPENDIX C.) 



SCHOOLS OF MILITAEY INSTEUCTION. 

Keturn of Officers, N. C. Officers and Men who have qualified in the Koyal Schools! 
of Cavalry, Artillery and Infantry, with Grade of Certificate obtained, for thd 
Half Year ending 30th June 1892. 



School and Location. 



Cavalry, Quebec 

do Winnipeg. 

Artillery, Kingston, 
do Quebec . . . 



d(i Victoria, B.C. 
Infantry, Winnipeg 



Long Course. 



A. 



1st. 2nd 



do London 

do Toronto I 

do St. John's, Quebec 

do Eredericton . . , 



1st. 2nd 



1 . 



11 



Short Course. 



1st. 2nd 



1st. 2nd. 



2 1 

3 ! 3 

4 7 
3 1 

3 



26 



Special. 



A. 



1st. 



2nd. 



16 9t . . . 

4* . . . 

2 j 2 
1 .... 



L5 



6 

5 

5 : . 

17 I 6 
35 
12 10 
23 



111 



37 



Total. 



29 



Remarks. 



31 f3 Equitation. 

14 I* Equitation. 

21 [ 

31 

16 

13 

35 

72 

38 

41 

312 



WALKEK POWELL, Colonel, 

Adjutant-General. 



Militia and Defence. 



(APPKNDIX D.) 



JLEMENTARY Return showing number of Officers and Men of the City Corps of 

Active Militia trained in ihe year 1891-92 at Local Headquarters. 

























Military Distnct. 


Authorized Esta- 
blishment. 


Received 
12 1 >ays Training. 


Received u 

12 Days Tra 

"Z 
r. 
_■/. 

t 1 c 'c 

8 d^ 

fc 


rider 

Ding. 


1 m rained. 


Officers. 


N. C. O.'s and 
Men. 


00 

<v 

V* 



w 


so 

u 

Qj 
5 

m 
o 


N. C. O.'s and 

men. 


« 
v. 

u 

o 

w 


Hoist- 


Office rs. 

N. C. O.'s and 

Men. 


Horses. 


No. 2 . . 


32 

74 
21 


330 
734 
210 


126 
3 


22 

54 
15 


330 
726 
152 


5 
123 


j... . : ... 

1 35 





10 6 

20 8 

5 23 


3 

3 


11 

Total 


127 


1,280 


134 


91 


1,208 


128 


1 35 




35 37 


6 












9 


^ALJ 


KER POW 


ELL, 

Adju 


Colonel, 
dant-General. 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



A. 189 
(APPP] 



Inspection Report of the Cor 



MILITARY DISTRICT 

No. 2, 

Lieutenant-Colonel W. D. OTTER, 

Dep. Ad jt. -General. 



Establish- 
ment. 



Corps. 



Battalion 

or 

Corps. 



Commanding 

Officer and Head 

Quarters. 



O d 



Actual Strength present 
at Inspection. 



02 


T3T3 


*y 


CI s 


ce ss 


^8> 


02 

SB 




p o 




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c 
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>> 


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£ 



ig's 



48th Battalion. 
Highlanders . . . 

A Company 

B do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Lt.-Col. Davidson, 
Toronto 

Capt. Robertson, 
Toronto 

Capt. McGillivray, 
Toronto 

Capt. Currie, To- 
ronto 

Lieut. Michie, To- 
ronto 

Capt. Cassells, To- 
ronto 

Capt. Hendrie, To- 
ronto . 

Capt, Hunter, To- 
ronto 

Capt. Henderson, 
Toronto 

Staff 

Total 



32 



42 
42 
42 

42 
42 

42 

42 | 2 
42 I 2 



33(5 



22 



30 



1!) 



27(1 



10 



nix B.) 



Militia and Defence. 



included in Appendix D. 



a s 

B'«3 < 



C eS 



- 



J g 



II 

if 



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O i be 



gsfi 



o 
- 



a 

— 

a 



d 

■+- 
c 

■n 



Target Practic< 



1) 

J* 



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3 o g j tf 

I 



Figure < 

Merit. 



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4^ 




w 


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s8 


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Q 



Remarks. 



No opportunity for tar- 
get practice, owing 
to the recent organi- 
zation of the Corps. 



S^j 


4 


55 


5C 

r-i 


§ 


d 










& 


i-s 


-d 


x 


-u 






s 



Inspected by T). A. (t. on the occa- 
sion of the Presentation of Col- 
ours by His Excellency the I rov- 
ernor (ieneral. Excellent phy- 
sique, and very steady under 
arms, considering that the Bat- 
talion has only been in existence 
for eight months. This Corps 
promises to be a most efficient 
one. 



11 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 189; 

Inspection Keport of the Corp 



MILITARY DISTRICT 

No. 7, 

Lieut. -Col. T. J. DUCHESNAY, 

Dep. Adjt. -General. 



Battalion 

or 

Corps. 



Commanding 

Officer and Head 

Quarters. 



Establish- 


ment. 


Corps. 




ns 




as 


8 

m 


o d 


o 


£ 



Actual Strength present 
at Inspection. 





■r. 


-co 










C 










03 -»-S 






be C 

§3 § 


s s 




$2 


qPh 03 

a" £S 


GO 

03 

o 




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Ambi 


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pq 







a: - 






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03 

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03 
09 


eral 
to m 
nspo 


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X 03 "^ f 


03 


J3 

O 


the 
roce 
e of 




O 

a 


'• c o 

03 o a 

2 ° 2 | 


>> 


5 


1^ 


sg 


n 


.3^ 88 


'O 


c 


o 


o 










J8 






rf 1 


b 


03 


03 


T? 


fc 


E 


S 


§ 



Q. O. C. Hussars . I 2 
A Troop . . . 
B do . . . 



8th Royal Rifles. 
A Company . . 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



9th Battali 



No. 1 


Company 


No. 2 


do .. 


No. 3 


do .. 


No. I 


do .. 


No 5 


do .. 


No. 6 


do .. 


No. 7 


do .. 


No. 8 


do .. 



Lieut. -Col. Forsyth, 
Quebec. 

Capt. Breakey, Que- 
bec 3 

Capt. Hethrington, 
Quebec . 3 

Staff 6 

Total 12 



Lieut. -Col. Prower, 

Quebec. 
Capt. Wood, Quebec 

do Burstall do . . 

do Dunbar do . . 

do Ray do . . 

do Dunn do . . 

do Wurtell do . . 
Staff 

Total 2G 



Quebec Garrisoi 

\rtill,i\ 



Lieut. -Col. Amyot, 
Quebec. 

Capt. Garneau, Que- 
bec 

Major Chouinard, 
Quebec 

Capt. Trudel, Quebec 
do Stein do 
do Pennee do 
do Evanturel do 
do Pinault do 
do Routiner do 

Staff 



Total 



Capt. Morgan, Que 

bee 



104 



3 


42 


2 


3 


42 


1 


3 


42 


2 


3 


42 


3 


3 


42 


2 


3 


42 


2 


8 




8 



11 



252 20 



33 330 22 



42 2 



13 



25 



28 



L>4 



4:. 



40 



182 



Hi 



258 



39 12 



31 12 

32 12 



3? 



do 



do 



do 



12 





icludcd 


iti Append 


Militia and Defence. 

ix D — Continued. 




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6 

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1 

1 
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o> 

s 

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b 
o 
SB- 
'S 

X 

"3 

s s 
o 


Target Practice. 


i 

o 
T 

1 


Date when Drill was completed. 


Remarks. 




1 



i . 

Is 


X 

be 
C 

n 


Figure of 

Merit. 






o 

is 

■is 

PQ 


| 



O 














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a 

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1 


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si 

SO 

8i 

X 


Inspected by Lieut.-Col. Duches- 
nay, D.A.G., M.D. No. 7. 










5 

go 

J 

'x 

3 

8 


do 


do 


1 
15 

4 
16 
26 
26 


do 


i 
1 

30 10 
24 25 
„ 9 . 7ft 33 11 
32 70 4512 
26 66 
37 00 


?5 


Inspected by Lieut. -Col. Mpntizam- 
bert, Commandant "B" Batterv, 
R.S.A. 










1 

X 

a 

c3 

'5 
"8 

1 

1 


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1 


do 

do 


1 
2 

i 


do 


13 65 


3 99 

20-70 
(1 (57 

24 22 
962 

18 ' 95 

15 34 


do 


do 


Inspected by Lieut.-Col. Ducbes- 
nay, D.A.G., M.D. No. 7. 














23 

X 

M 


Si 

X 

iH 

® 

1 


l!< marks oftht Inspector of Artillery . 

Physique very poor ; drill bad. 
Battery not efficient : did not 
practice. Inspected by Major 
Wilson; CA. 

D. T. Irwin, Lt.-Col, 
Inspector of Artillery. 






















i:- 


. 







56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 1893! 

Inspection Eeport of the Corph 



MILITARY DISTRICT 

No. 11, 
Lieutenant-Colonel J. G. HOLMES, 

Acting Dep. Adjt.-General. 



Establish- 
ment. 



Corps. 



Battalion 

or 

Corps. 



© Commanding 
£ Officer and Head 
a Quarters. 



Actual Strength present 
at Inspection. 







-t-> 




= 




aj 


3 


5D C 




- 






7. 


Ian 










CO 


r 




a; 


V 






r~- 


fcti 




«s 


s 






OQ 





"CO 
e8 eS 



5 £ 
S ^ 

3 a; 



















£T g 






c "g . 






U?t! 


1 


a5 


1o» 


a 




© -3 c 


u 


a; 

O 


s> cS 


<2 

in 


the se 
roceed 
e of tr 


'S 


o 
p. 


32 ~~ 


OS 


S 




>> 


c8 


•pcSC 


c3 

73 


O 


P 





•" 






1 


a* 
J3 






C3 
3 




© 


O 


£ 


F 


| 


S 



British Columbia 
Brigade Garri- 
son Artillery. . . 



No. 1 Battery. 



No. 2 do 



Lt.-Col. Brior, Vic- 
toria 



C a p t . Townley, 
New Westmins- 



Lt. Sargison, Vic- 
toria. 



No. 3 do .... Capt. Quinlan, Vic- 
toria 



No. 4 <\< 



New Westminster 
Rifle Co. 



Nanaimo I nfantry 
Co 



Capt. Smallfield. 

Victoria 

Staff 



42 



12 



3 I 42 

3 I 42 
6 



Total 



Vacant,New West 

minster 



18 168 



14 



12 



Capt. McGregor, 
Nanaimo 3 



42 



32 

27 

25 

29 
113 



12 



12 



12 



12 



12 



28 



L2 



do 



14 



Militia and Defence. 

eluded in Appendix D — Concluded. 



£* 



g u 

PQ £ 

^~ 

_-r 

a 5 



r 2 = — ^ 

1 Sit -^ 

log --^ 

- - r 



:=-£ 



w — K' 









fl.8 



o a 



Tract ice. 




figure of 




Merit. 




1 


■ fi 
























Q 






X 












I 














g 


>> 


h- 1 














i5 


oi 


o 








-t-> 


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ci 


2 




W 


° 


P 



fl 



05^05 






dodo 



do 



x do 



c3 . 

^ - 

CO 






£2 



The Head Quarter Batteries performed Battalion Drill 

under the Major fairly well. All the clothing of 
; these Batteries is worn out. The accoutrements old 
l and of several patterns. New issue recommended. 

This is a very good Battery ; ranks first in Brigade in 

efficiency. Company drill, manual and firing exer- 

| cises well done. Armoury well kept, and interior 

economy very good. New drill shed and armoury 

much needed at New Westminster. 

This Battery showed 2 well drilled gun detachments. 
Battery in good order; ranks third in Brigade m 
efficiency. Company drill, manual and filing exer- 
cises fairly well done. Armoury well kept, and 
interior economy fair. 

Battery in fair order ; ranks fourth in Brigade in effi- 
ciency. Company drill, manual and firing exercises 
fairly done. Armoury well kept, and interior econ- 
omy poor. 

Battery in very good order ; ranks second in Brigade 
in efficiency. Manual and firing exercises and com- 
pany drill well done. Armoury well kept. Interior 
economy very good. 

Each battery at Head Quarters furnished one well 
drilled gun detachment. 

lli murks of tht G .O.C. 

The remarks of the D.A.It. can only be accepted in a 
relative sense. The Brigade is not in a satisfactory 
condition, though this is not due to any want of zeal 
on the part of the officers, who have had great diffi- 
culties to contend with. To obtain any degree of 
j efficiency the establishment must be increased and 
oiganized on a sound basis. 

[VOB Hkrbkkt, 

Maj.-Oi a. 



Disorganized. 



do 



Me/narks of tht a. O.C. 

>■ >> 

3^ J^ M At my inspection on the 8th September the state of 
31 cr organization of this company appeared to be very 
£»h imperfect, and proper steps had not been taken 
?, by the D. A. G. to put it on a proper footing. 

Ivor Herbert, 

Maj.-Oen. 
__ 

15 






56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 189; 



(APPENDIX F.) 



KOYAL MILITARY COLLEGE OF CANADA. 



REPORT OF THE COMMANDANT. 



Royal Military College of Canada, 

Kingston, Ont., 28th June, 1892. 
The President, 

Royal Military College of Canada. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report for the Royal Militar 
College year 1891-92. 

The progress of the College, in fulfilling its high purpose, has been satisfactor 
during the past year; and, the credit for the success it well maintains, is due in pa 
to the happy combination, in its instructional staff, of high professional attainmeni 
with large views of the responsibilities of instructors beyond the routine of impar 
ing class knowledge ; and, in a great degree to the cadets themselves. 

I cannot recall from my personal experience any instance in which the relation 
between the students and instructors have been more satisfactory than preva 
here. 

[t is a source of great pleasure to observe the ambition of the Cadets toimprovt 
and to note their respectful yet cordial relations with — and reliance on their Pr 
feasors, and their submission to, and ultimate pride in a disciplinary system to whic 
they had previously been unaccustomed. 

Regarding the welfare of the Institution as intimately interwoven with t 
welfare of the country, I would remark on scattered press notices, which appesj 
from time to time, adverse to the continuance of the College. Those notices I veil 
ture to consider most ill advised. 

This College is alone of its kind in the Dominion: it is an essential nursery fo] 
the germs of a military force without which — in the absence of universal brotheij 
hood, — enduring internal peace and national independence are unattainable. 

Those who decry the maintenance of efficient military organization shoul 
justify their attitude by indicating the people who have ever enjoyed continue 
national independence, or now enjoy it, unaided by respect for armed strength, or bj 
inaccessibility. 

It is a matter of familiar knowledge that war does not occur unless — on one sidl 
or on both — absence of moral rectitude is the determining cause. 

Military organization — unfortunately — is as essential to national preservatio 
as the elaborate department of justice is essential to social order. 

But, fortunately the status of Canada, as apart of the Empire, has made i] 
fitting and wise to modify the system of instruction followed at the Royal Militar | 
College, BO that while the military demands of the country upon it, may be dull 
supplied, its Cadets arc, trained to take their place amongst their fel low-country mer. 
as highly and technically trained gentlemen in most practical professions, and in 
large measure prepared to enter the learned professions. 

16 



Militia and Defence. 

We sincerely hope that the time is not far distant when the Government may 

el themselves justified in giving full effect to their Order-in-Council of a date 

'itainly prior to 1882, in which it is declared that " so soon as there are a sufficient 

number of eligible graduates, appointments to permanent Militia corps will bo 

; made solely from this list (i.e. of graduates) ; and after sufficient length of service 

iand rank have been obtained by graduates, permanent Militia offices will be tilled 

therefrom." That a national Military school should be maintained and its techni- 

lally trained graduates remain unemployed in the Canadian Military forces, certainly 

- anomalous. 

If untrained gentlemen are better qualified than the technically trained military 
raduates of this College, to officer the Canadian permanent corps, — then indeed, it 
mst be admitted that — for military purposes — the school is at present superfluous. 

The question is not one as to the fitness of gentlemen now holding appointments 
ii the permanent corps, who by experience in the service may have become perhaps 
'xceptionally well qualified. The point I would raise is that of first appointments, 
n such cases, should untrained, or specially and technically trained men be appointed? 
fhere is a general agreement of opinion, not merely amongst the public, but amongst 
ixperts of the greatest weight and who have had experience of graduates' capabili- 
ies in military life — that the course of training at the Royal Military College is 
jdmirably adapted for supplying army officers. 

Some of their number are already on the roll of those who have added distinc- 
tion to the name of their native land abroad; and — at home — from Cape Breton to 
lount St. Elias, over more than one-fifth of the longitude of the globe, are thought 
with affectionate pride. 

From many sources too, I have heard of the high estimate placed upon others 
/ho, in the absence of military employment, or by choice, have elected to follow 
ivil pursuits. I have learned with pleasure and pride of several of them immedi- 
tely winning confidence in their characters and capabilities, and rapid advancement 
n positions of responsibility. The graduating class of this year compares favour- 
bly with its predecessors, — in some respects it has excelled all others. 

Sergeant Francis Henry Vercoe is in the distinguished position of being the 
rinner of higher aggregate marks than have ever been gained by a graduate here. 

The Professor of Mathematics writes of him : — " His ability is remarkably un- 
ommon, and it does seem fortunate, that the College has him on her list of graduates." 

I cordially concur in Professor Martin's opinion, an opinion fully confirmed by 
he reports of all the Professors without exception. 

Company Sergeant-Major James Frederic Fraser has won higher aggregate 
larks than — with one previous exception — have been scored hitherto. His applica- 
ion and abilities are also reported on by all the Professors as of a very high order. 

The Professor of Chemistry reports that "Company Sergeant-Major Fraser 
btained the largest number of marks yet obtained in the first class;" while, in 
hysics, Dr. Waddell states: "The average of marks of Mr. Fraser and Mr. Vercoe 
i greater than the average of the two highest in physics in any former years. 
* After two years' struggle they stand practically equal, Mr. Vercoe 
aving 1888 and Mr. Fraser 1887 marks." 

Then, this year's third man, Battalion Sergeant-Major Dumble — who has had the 
lisfortune to have had his studies interrupted by illness — adds to the distinction of 
he graduating class this year. 

On only two previous occasions has his aggregate of marks been exceeded at 
,he College. The Professor of Mathematics reports that " Messrs. Dumble and Fraser 
are deserving of special mention for their attainments only second to that of their 
, class-mate Mr. Vercoe." 

As BattaHon Sergt-Major, Mr. Dumble's duties have involved responsibilities 
fan exceptional kind in the disciplinary system of the College, and it affords me 
■reat satisfaction to state that he has discharged those duties in the most exem- 
plary manner. 

17 
19—2 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 18S 

To these three gentlemen the College if indebted for their efforts and succe;, 
in not merely maintaining its reputation, but in advancing it in a very marla 
degree. In passing I may mention as a test of application to work — modifiedH 
some measure by individual temperament — a few details from the Medical Officea 
watchful record. 

At the end of May the average increase of weight of the graduating class d* 
in excess of 15 lbs. 

During the examination month — June — the three leaders lost respectively 2J- IB, 
3J lbs. and 5J lbs. 

Four of the others lost about 1 lb. 

The two lowest in their class lost no weight, but one of these increased I 
I} lbs. 

As evidence of the physical improvement in Cadets during their residence he;, 
it is noted that the average increase in weight has been over 15 lbs.; in height | 
inches ; in chest measurement 2J inches ; and that — with the single exception ok 
height measurement — there has been increase in all cases. 

The Professors have made special mention of several Cadets as deserving}! 
commendation, and I have great pleasure in acknowledging my personal indebtl- 
ness to them for their meritorious work and conduct. 

The Professors remark : 

In Mathematics. 

4th Class. — Gentleman Cadet G. O. Wilkes, 

G. N. Cory, 
have shown marked ability. 

Gentleman Cadet G. A. Inksetter, 
" J. W. Osborne, 
" K. J. F. Hayter, 
11 G. E. Frith, 
have been most diligent and promise to do splendidly. 

3rd Class. — The progress made by the whole class has quite exceeded jll 
expectationR. 

Gentleman Cadet G. F. F. Osborne and 
" " H. B. Muckleston 

possess a brilliancy of intellect which is not often met with. Their mathematjil 
ability is of a high order. 

Gentleman Cadet V. L. Beer, 
F N, Gibbs, 
H. D. L. Gordon, 
J. E. Beatty, 
" E. W. Brij>stocke, 
" J. D. Doull, 
»' F. C. Heneker, 
" A. G. T. LeFevre, 
" F. B. Osier, 
have taken special interest in their work, with good results. 
Gentleman Cadet E. H. B. Magee and 
11 E. E. Tyrwhitt 
are noted for special application at.d the most marked advance in their class. 

2nd Class. — The Professor — noting that the hardest work is in this cl * 
brings specially under notice the work of 

Gentleman Cadet A. W. Burnham, 
Corporal C. F. J. B. deBoucherville, 

E. H. Strickland, 
Gentleman Cadet H. N. B. Hollinshead, 

" .I.W.Warner, 
Sergeant B. H. O. Armstrong. 

18 



(i 

(( 


It 


« 


it 



Militia and Defence. 



In mentioning Mr. Burnham's name the Professor adds of the results of his 

'ts : 

''This represents an immense amount of work in one year, and without a splen- 
lid ability it could not be done." 

" Mr. de Boucherville's standing is not far behind that of Mr. Burnham." 
1st Class. — Of the natural ability and wonderful application of 
Sergeant F. H. Vercoe, 
Company Sergeant-Major J. P. Eraser, and 
Battn Sergeant-Major W. C. Dumble 
lie Professor is unable to speak too highly. 

Military Engineering. 

4th Class. — Gentleman Cadet E. J. F. Hayter, 

" G. N. Cory, 
" G. E. Frith, 
11 J. W. Osborne 
jliave won from 88 to 84 per cent of full marks. 

Gentleman Cadet G. A. Inksetter, 
" " F. P. Brown and 

" N. S. Eidout 
leserve special mention for industry and zeal. 

3rd Class. — Gentleman Cadet V. L. Beer, 

" G. F. F. Osborne, 
" H. B. Muckleston, 
specially mentioned. 

Also, 2nd Class. — Sergeant B. H. O. Armstrong, 
Corporal C. J. Armstrong, 

C. F. J. B. de Boucherville. 
1st Class. — Companj^ Sergeant-Major J. F. Fraser, 
Sergeant F. H. Vercoe, 
Battn. Sergeant-Major W. C. Dumble. 

Surveying and Reconnaissance. 
The following are especially commended by their Professors : — 

3rd Class. — Geutleman Cadet G. F. F. Osborne, 
" " V. L. Beer. 

Surveying. 

2nd Class. — Corporal C. F. J. B. de Boucherville, 
Sergeant J. J. B. Farley. 

Reconnaissance. 

Corporal C. J. Armstrong. 

Tactics, Strategy and War Administration. 

3rd Class. — Gentleman Cadet V. L. Beer. 
2nd Class. — Corporal C. J. Armstrong. 
1st Class. — Sergeant F. H. Vercoe. 

Military Law. 

2nd Class.— Corporal C. F. J. B. de Boucherville. 
1st Class. — Sergeant F. H. Vercoe, 
F. F. Duffus. 
19 
19-2} 



<( 


a 


« 


a 


u 


n 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 18! 

Peace Administration. 

3rd Class. — Gentleman Cadet Y. L. Beer, 

G. F. Osborne, 
E. E. Tyrwhitt, 
B. F. Osier, 
Cadet Beer scoring over 97 per cent of full marks. 

Theoretical Artillery. 

3rd Class.— Gentleman Cadet G. F. F. Osborne, 
" " E. H. B. Magee, 

" " Y. L. Beer, 

" " E. E. Tyrwhitt. 

2nd Class. — Gentleman Cadet H. N. B. Hollinshead, 
Corporal C. F. J. B. de Boucherville, 
Gentleman Cadet A. W. Burnham. 





Practical 


Artillery — Drills and Exercises 


3rd Class.- 


—Gentleman Cadet Y. L. Beer, 




K 


u 


H. D. L. Gordon, 




« 


(1 


F. C. Heneker, 




U 


a 


E. H. B. Magee, 




11 


u 


H. B. Muckleston, 




11 


it 


E, E. Tyrwhitt, 



all with full marks. 

2nd Class. — Corporal W. F. Sweny, 
Sergeant J. J. B. Farley, 
Corporal E. H. Strickland, 
" C. J. Armstrong, 
all with full marks. 

French. 

4th Class. — This class has been far above the average. With the except 
of two Cadets, all scored 90 per cent of full marks. 
Gentleman Cadet G. N. Cory, 
" E. P. Brown, 
" E. J. F. Hayter, 
" G. E. Frith, 
"' G. S. Wilkes, 
" G. E. Francklyn, 
are specially mentioned. 

Also, 3rd Class. — Gentleman Cadet Y. L. Beer, 

" G. F. F. Osborne, 
" J. D. Doull, 
" A. G. T. LeFevre, 
" F. C. Heneker. 
2nd Class. — Corporal C. F. J. B. de Boucherville, 
Sergeant B. H. O. Armstrong, 
Corporal C. J. Armstrong, 
Gentleman Cadet J. E. Leckie, 
Sergeant J. J. B. Farley, 
Gentleman Cadet H. N. B. Hollinshead. 
1st Class. — Corporal J. E. L. du Plessis, 

Gentleman Cadet H. E. N. de Bury, 
Sergeant F. H. Vercoe, 
Batitn. Sergt.-Major W. C. Dumble, 
Sergeant C. H. Branscombe, 
Co. Sergt.-Major J. F. F'raser, 
Sergeant W. H. Sullivan. 
20 



Militia and Defence. 



English Literature. 

3rd Class.— Gentleman Cadet G. F. F. Osborne, 

" J. D. Doull, 
" V. L. Beer. 
" R. E. Tyrwhitt, 
iiserve honourable mention. 

2nd Class. — Sergeant B. H. O. Armstrong, 
J. J. B. Farley, 
Gentleman Cadet H. N. B. Hollinshead, 
Corporal C. J. Armstrong. 
1st Class. — Sergeant F. H. Vercoe is deserving of special mention. 

Physics. 

2nd Class. — Corporal C. F. J. B. de Boucherville, 
" R. H. Strickland, 
Gentleman Cadet A. W. Burnham. 
Sergeant B. H. O. Armstrong, 
1st Class. — Sergeant F. H. Vercoe, 

Co.'Sergt.-Major J. F. Fraser, 
hese two gentlemen scored, as already mentioned, higher than any two of previous 
are. 

Geology. 

1st Class. — Co. Sergt.-Major J. F. Fraser, 
Sergeant F. H. Vercoe. 

Chemistry. 

2nd Class. — Corporal C. F. J. B. de Boucherville, 

Gentleman Cadet J. T. Warner, 

Sergeant B. H. O. Armstrong, 

Gentleman Cadet A. W. Burnham. 
1st Class. — Co. Sergt.-Major J. F. Fraser, 

Battn. Sergt.-Major W. C. Durable. 

Freehand Drawing. 

4th Class. — Gentleman Cadet E. P. Brown, 

" G. E. Francklyn, 
" R. J. F. Hayter. 
2nd Class. — Sergeant B. II. O. Armstrong, 
J. J. B. Farley, 
Corporal W. F. Sweny. 
H. J. Lamb. 
1st Class. — Sergeant R. P. Rogers, 
F. H. Vercoe, 
" C. H. Branacombe, 
Corporal N. B. McLean. 

Practical Geometry and Engineering Drawing. 

4th Class. — Gentleman Cadet G. N. Cory, 
" G. R. Frith, 
" J. W. Osborne, 
" R. J. F. Hayter, 

" G. S. Wilkes. 
21 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 189 



3rd Class. — Gentleman Cadet G. F F. Osboriuv, 

" E. W. Brigstovke, 

" V. L. Beer, 

" F. B. Osier, 

" H. B. Muekleston, 
" " H. D. L. Gordon. 

2nd Class. — Corporal C. F. J. B. de Bouchervilie. 

Civil Engineering. 

Battn. Sergt.-Major W. C. Dumble, 
Co. Sergt.-Major J. F. Fraser, 
Sergeant W. H. Sullivan, 
•< F. H. Vercoe. 

Drills and Exercises. 

1st Class. — Battn. Sergt.-Major W. C. Dumble, 
Sergeant E. P. Eogers. 
Co. Sergt.-Major J. F. Fraser, 
Sergeant F. H. Vercoe, 
all very highly qualified. 

I have now the pleasure to add a list of gentlemen who aie prize winners a 
of those who are about to leave the College as " Honour" graduates and 
" Passed " graduates. 



JUNE, 1892. 

Prize Classification. 
Annual Class Prizes. 

4th Class. — Highest Proficiency — Gent. Cadet George Norton Cory, Bishop's Colic 

School, Lennoxville. 
3rd Class " Gent. Cadet George Frederick Folger Osbon 

Collegiate Institute, Kingston. 
4th Class " Corp. Charles Felix Joseph Boucher de Boucht 

ville, St. Mary's College, Montreal. 
1st Class " Sergt. Francis Henry Yercoe, Collegiate Institu 

Toronto. 

Entire Course. — Subject Prizes. 

Mathematics and Mechanics Sergt. Francis Henry Yercoe, Collegiate Instil 

Toronto. 
Military Engineering Co. Sergt.-Major James Frederick Fraser, 

legiate Institute, Kingston. 
Surveying, Military Topography 

and Practical Astronomy Sergt. Francis Henry Yercoe, Collegiate Institi 

Toronto. 
Military History, Tactics and Mili- 
tary Administration Batt. Sergt.-Major Wilfred Chatterton Dum 

Trinity College School, Port Hope. 
'" reuch Corp. Joseph Eugene Lenoblet du Plessis, Line 

College Sorel, P.Q. 
English Sergt. Francis Henry Yercoe, Collegiate Instit 

Toronto. 
Chemistry Co. Sergt.-Major James Frederick Fraser, I 

legiate Institute, Kingston. 



Militia and Defence. 



f Sergt. Francis Henry Vercoe, Collegiate Insti- | . 
) tute, Toronto. I § 

W 81CS ] Co. Sergt.-Major James Frederick Eraser, Col- ^ 

(^ legiate Institute, Kingston, 

'eology Co. Sergt.-Major James Frederick Eraser, Col- 
legiate Institute, Kingston, 
jreehand Drawing and Painting. .Sergt. Eobert Percy Eogers, Collegiate Institute, 

Peterboro'. 
livil Engineering ..Batt. Sergt.-Major Wilfred Chatterton Dumble, 

Trinity College School, Port Hope, 
prills and Exercises Batt. Sergt.-Major Wilfred Chatterton Dumble, 

Trinity College School, Port Hope. 
.rtilllery .....Gent. Cadet Henry Neville Block Hollinshead, 

Trinity College School, Port Hope. 
Ingineering Drawing Sergt. Bertie Harold Oliver Armstrong, High 

School, Montreal. 
Reconnaissance Sergt. Francis Henry Vercoe, Collegiate Institute, 

Toronto. 

Extra Prizes. 

)ominion Artillery Association ...Gent. Cadet George Frederick Folger Osborne, 

Collegiate Institute, Kingston. 

)ntario Artillery Association Gent. CadetFrank Nicholson Gibbs, Upper Canada 

College. 



DIPLOMAS. 
Names. Distinguished in 

Sergt. Herbert Wareham Clinch, Collegiate School, 

Rothesay . .. 

jent. Cadet William Mackenzie, High School, 

Sarnia • Civil Engineering. 

3orp. Norman Berford McLean, High School, 

Brockville Civil Engineering. 

Grent. Cadet Wm. Nassau Clarke, High School, 

Brockville 

Corp. Joseph Eugene Lenoblet du Plessis, Lincoln 

College, Sorel French. 

Sergt. Francis Ferguson Duffus, Merchiston 

Castle, Edinburgh Civil Engineering. 

Sergt.-Major Frank DugaldReid, High School, 

Georgetown Civil Engineering. 

Sergt. Clarence Henry Branscombe, High School, 

Picton 

Gent. Cadet Henry Robert Yisart de Bury, Stony- 
hurst College, England French and Civil Engineering. 

Sergt. Wm. Henry Sullivan, Collegiate Institute, 

Kingston Civil Engineering. 

Sergt. Robert Percy Rogers, Collegiate Institute, 

Peterboro' Freehand Drawing Drills and Exer- 
cises. 



23 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 19.) 



A. 189; 



DIPLOMAS WITH HONOURS. 



Names. 



Distinguished in 



( Mathematics and Mechanics. 

Military Engineering. 
I Military History, Strategy, Tactics, Military Ad| 
Battn. Sergt.-Major Wilfred | ministration and Law. 

Chatterton Bumble, Trinity <[ Practical Geometry and Engineering Drawing. 



College, School, Port Hope. 



French. 

English. 

Drills and Exercises. 

Civil Engineering. 



Co.Sergt.-Major JamesFrederick 



Sergt. Francis Henry Vercoe, 
Collegiate Institute, Toronto. 



f Mathematics and Mechanics. 
Military Engineering. 

Practical Geometry and Engineering Drawing, 
French. 

)llegiate Institute, <j gg£ oW and volunt 

Drills and Exercises. 

Chemistry, obligatory and voluntary. 

Civil Engineering. 

Geology. 

f Mathematics and Mechanics. 
Military Engineering. 
Military Topography, Reconnaissance and Suri 

veying. 
Practical Geometry and Engineering Drawing. 
French. 
English. 

Physics, obligatory and voluntary. 
Freehand Drawing. 
Drills and Exercises. 
Civil Engineering. 
^Geology. 

" Stanley Medals." 
(For the highest aggregate of marks for the whole course.) 

Gold medal — Sergeant Francis Henry Vercoe, Collegiate Institute, Toronto. 

Silver medal — Co. Sergt.-Major James Frederick Fraser, Collegiate Institute, 
Kingston. 

Bronze medal — Battn. Sergt.-Major Wilfred Chatterton Dnmble, Trinity Colle^ 
School, Port Hope. 

Sword of Honour for Good Conduct and Discipline. 
Co. Sergt.-Major James Frederick Fraser, Collegiate Institute, Kingston. 
The " Lord Stanley " Prize. 

(To the qualified graduate intending to pursue a military profession either 
the imperial Forces or in the Dominion Militia, for the highest proficiency 
Military Engineering, Military Administration and Law, Strategy and Tacti< 
Military Surveying, Topography and Reconnaissance.) 

Battn. Sergt.-Major Wilfred Chatterton Dumble, Trinity College School, P( 
Hope. 

24 



Militia unci Defence. 



Recommended for Commissions in Her Majesty's Regular Army. 

Eoyal Engineers — Battn. Sergt.-Major Wilfred Chatterton, Dumble, Trinity 
College School, Port Hope. 

Eoyal Artillery — Gent. Cadet Henry Robert Visart de Bury, Stony hurst College, 
England. 

t f S Sergeant Francis Ferguson Dutfus, Merchiston Castle, Edinburgh, 

lntantrv— | gei ^ t Herbert Wareham Clinch, Collegiate School, Rothesay, N.B. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. R. CAMERON, 

Commandant, 

Royal Military College. 



25 



Militia and Defence. 



APPENDIX No. 2 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



MILITIA AND DEFENCE. 



Half-year ended 30th June, 1892. 



REPOET OF THE DIRECTOR OF STORES. 



Department of Militia and Defence, 

Store Branch, Ottawa, 1st December, 1892. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report concerning the Military 
Stores and properties under my charge covering the period from the 1st January 
to the 30th June, 1892. It having been decided to harmonize the Annual Report of 
the Department with the fiscal year, this report may therefore be considered as 
supplementary to that of last year. 

clothing and military stores. 

The Militia clothing, store supplies and necessaries continue to be furnished, 
as in the past, by Canadian contractors. The Inspectors of the Department 
reported that the various articles, after due inspection, were found satisfactory, and 
in accordance with the sealed patterns. 

The aggregate issues ot clothing for the period from 1st January to 30th June 
last have been 4,913 cloth, serge and tweed tunics, 6,545 pairs of cloth, serge and 
tweed trousers, 3,163 forage caps and 3,445 great coats. 

The detailed issues of clothing are shown in the following tabular statement: — 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No 19. 



A. 1893 



ISSUES. 

















Halifax 






Trousers, 


Trousers, 






Riding 


Tweed 


Tunics, Cloth. 


Tunics, Serge. 


Cloth, Pairs. 


Serge, Prs. 


Forage Caps. 


Great Coats 


Breeches. 


Cloth- 




















ing. 


>. 


>> 


+3 O 

CO 


J3 




>» 

h 


5>> 

© 


& 




h 


© 


b 


© 


>> 


£> 


>> 

33 


>■ 




>i 


>> 

© 


b© 


& 


© 


►s 




£| 


o3 

> 

6 


< 


o © 

as 


s 
1— 1 


© 

5 


is 

> 

eS 
O 




§ 

h- 1 


a; 

© 

5 


sS 
> 

o 


"+3 


"a 

h- 1 


"-5 
< 


HH 


r. 

© 

5 


> 

o 


1 


eS 

— 


90 

© 

-2 


"3 
> 

D 

__ 


I 


IS 

n 

M 


> 

o 


_! 


a 


"S 


i 


l -: 


a 


IM 


00 

b- 


1 




b- 




§3 


o 


b- 


to 


to 

GO 


g 


H 


H 


8 


C 
X 


95 




CO 


O 


8 


•* 


! 


GO 


§s 


JO 


b- 


i— i 


r- 


i—i 


cc 


JO 




>o 


i—i 


<N 


© 


t- 


93 


71 




-p 


M 


Tf 


io 


rf< 


l-H 


rH 




i-H 


l-H 




























<N 


rH 






H 








<M 













AMMUNITION. 

Practice ammunition issued to the Militia Force for the six months ending 30th 
June, 1892, was as follows: — Snider ball, 409,355 rounds, and blank, 78,250 rounds.] 
( Vide Appendix A.) 

The issues on repayment for the same period were 118,770 rounds of Sniderl 
ball, 600 rounds of blank, 25,470 rounds of Martini-Henry ball, 100 rounds of 
revolver, and 700 rounds of ball for the new Magazine Eifle (Lee-Metford). also! 
5,000 rounds of aiming tube ammunition, making a total of 150,640 rounds to Eifle 
Associations and Militia Corps for target practice. 

Deposit receipts to credit of the Eeceiver-General for sale of ammunition fori 
the year ending 30th June last amounted, to $11,748.91, which includes the price of J 
friction tubes issued to the Department of Marine and Fisheries for Fog Signal 
Service, and powder and friction tubes for Noon Gun at Ottawa. ( Vide Appendix B.) 

Field and Garrison Batteries of Artillery received the usual supply of powder, 
shot and shell for annual practice and salutes. ( Vide Appendix C.) 

The demand for small-arm ammunition, ball and blauk, was fully met by j 
receipts from the Cartridge factory at Quebec; besides the reserve in magazine 
charge was largely added to from the factory. 

The manufacture of Martini-Henry ammunition having been introduced at the 
Quebec factory, a supply of 249,000 rounds has been received in store charge, 
also a supply of 9-pr. common and 64-pr. shrapnel shell. 

A reserve supply of E.L.G. 4 powder has been received from the Hamilton 
Powder Company, and found to be satisfactory after undergoing the usual tests at | 
Quebec. 



ORDNANCE. 



The Eeturn of guns in charge at the several stations will be found in 
Appendix D. 

Many of these guns are, of course, old and obsolete, but until they are replaced 
by new and modern ordnance, it might not be considered advisable to dispose of | 
them in any way ; however, this is a question for consideration of higher authority. 



ARMS. 



The armourers of the several Military Districts are reported as being fully ei 
ployed in the repairs of arms at their respective stations. 

The services of an Armourer are much needed at London, and at St. John, N.B„ 
and an assistant armourer at Winnipeg. Attention has already been drawn to this 
subject in a previous report. 



28 



Militia and Defence, 



HOARDS OF SURVEY. 

Annual Boards of Survey on Militia stores were held during the year in each 
Military District as required by Regulations and Orders. The duties of* these Boards 
ire to make an inspection of the ordnance, ammunition, warlike and other stores in 
jkarge of the Superintendents of Stores, to report on their state and the condition of 
he buildings and works, to furnish a list of stores of every kind that the Boards 
nay consider obsolete or unserviceable, with a recommendation as to their 
lisposal, — also a return of such stores as are reparable. 

The reports of the Boards show that the stores in charge of the Superintendent at 
3ach station were carefully inspected. The recommendations of the Boards were 
•arried out, when the quantity was large enough to justify a sale by public 
tuction. Articles condemned as unfit for further service were sold in the 
tsual manner. The proceeds of such sales were placed at the credit of the Receiver- 
3eneral. 

Independently of the stores condemned as useless from fair wear and tear, there 
\re certain articles of accoutrements and equipment which, although considered 
obsolete, are not absolutely useless, and until a new supply can be obtained 
they have been continued on store charge to meet any possible contingency. 

A number of old gun waggons and sleighs reported upon by special Boards of 
Survey as unfit for further service, have been ordered to be disposed of as recom- 
mended by the General Officer Commanding and authorized by the Honourable the 
Minister of Militia. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY. 

I have already submitted a memorandum recommending the appointment of one 
or more harness makers to overhaul the old harness and saddlery returned into 
store from field batteries, with a view of repairing and putting the same in condition 
or re-issue ; any portion that might be found useless could then be disposed of. 
I may add that this recommendation is strongly supported by the Major-Generai 
Commanding. 

Kingston and Quebec, where the most accommodation is available, would 
appear to be the best places to establish workshops for this purpose ; accoutrements 
and other stores could also be repaired at these places, and a great saving of public 
money thereby effected. 

CAMP LOSSES AND DEFICIENCIES. 

It is almost impossible to avoid more or less damage to camp equipment, and 
deficiencies of articles issued during the annual training of the Militia. The 
jaggregate value of such losses is being reduced from year to year. The usual 
jsteps have been taken to recover the amounts from the commanding officers of 
jcorps responsible for the same. 

MILITARY PROPERTIES. 

The officers in charge of military properties in the several districts report the 
same to be in a satisfactory condition. All repairs provided for in the estimates 
were carefully carried out under direction of the Architect of the Department. 

Under this head, I would beg to draw attention to the pressing necessity that 
exists for providing a suitable store building at London, At present the district stores 
are kept in rooms connected with the barracks originally erected for the Infantry 
School Corps at that station, and not at all suited for the proper care of military 
stores ; besides, the space occupied by the stores is now urgently required by the 
Infantry School. 

A powder magazine is also required in connection with these stores. Owing to 
the want of this building and the very limited accommodation for the district stores, 
ammunition and other stores intended for the supply of Military District No. 1 have 

29 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



A. 1893 



to be kept in reserve at Toronto. This has been attended with inconvenience, besides 
causing extra expense for transport. 

I have aiso to refer to the necessity of building magazines for use of th( 
store branch at Halifax, N.S., and at Victoria, B.C. For the present the Depart 
ment has to depend upon the Imperial authorities at these stations for the. temporary 
use of their magazines for the storage of powder and warlike stores. 

The following statement shows the number of tenants and the amounts receivec 
on account of rentals for military properties under lease for the fiscal year ending 
30th June, 1892. 

Tenants and Eental from 1st July, 1891, to 30th June, 1892. 



Number 

of 
Tenants. 



104 



Station. 



Niagara 

. Toronto 

.Kingston 

Ottawa 

. Montreal 

. Laprairie 

St. John's, Que 

Isle aux Noix 

. Quebec 

. Levis 

New Brunswick 

. Nova Scotia 

.Prince Edward Island 



Rents 
received. 



. Total number of tenants . 



Total amount of rents received 



$ cts. 

117 00 
120 00 
528 31 

1 00 
302 50 

2 00 
50 00 
84 00 

2,624 57 

385 20 

177 25 

53 08 

5 87 



4,450 78 



Remarks 



DEPOSIT RECEIPTS. 



The following statement shows the amount received by the Store Branch oi 
account of ammunition and stores issued on repayment, and for rents of military pi 
perties during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1892 : — 



Ammunition. 


Military Stores. 


Clothing. 


Rents. 


Total Amounts. 


9 cts. 
11.7 is ill 


$ cts. 
1,793 33 


$ cts. 
2,132 70 


$ cts. 
4,450 78 


$ cts. 
20,125 72 




M 


ILITARY MUSEUM 







The interest in the Museum at Ottawa is steadily maintained, and a number 
articles of a military and historical character have been received from officers 
Militia and others during the year; further contributions of a like nature are 
pected from Officers and others interested in the military history of Canada. 

A considerable number of books on military subjects have been received, 
tbe suggestion is again revived as to the establishment of a Military Institute 
Library at Ottawa for the benefit of the Officers of the Force, and as to the arranj 
ment of winter courses of lectures under its auspices. 



80 



Militia and Defence. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

Since the date of my last report a change in the Store Staff lias taken place in 
litary District No. 2, Lt.-Colcnel J. Vance Graveley, of the 40th Battalion, having 
m appointed Superintendent of Stores at Toronto upon the retirement of Lt.- 
lonel W. N. Alger, an old and valued officer ot the Militia, who while serving hi 

Store Branch, performed his duties with zeal and efficiency. 

It affords me pleasure to bring under your notice the efficient services rendered 
)j the Staff at Headquarters, and the District Superintendents of Stores. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

J. MACPHEESON, Lt.-Colonel, 
Director of Stores and Keeper of Militia Properties. 
The Deputy of the Minister 

Of Militia and Defence, 
Ottawa. 

[A.j 

Small Arm Ammunition issued for practice from the 1st January 
to 30th June r 1892. 



Districts, 



Rounds. 



Military District No 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1, London . 

2, Toronto 

3, Kingston 

4, Ottawa 

5-6, Montreal 

7, Quebec 

8, St. John, N.B. 

10, Winnipeg . . 

11, Victoria, B.C 



Issued to Militia Corps for Rifle League Competitions . 



Total 



Ball. 



H4,7(i5 
55,000 
20,800 
3,700 
07,910 
32,340 
17,000 



12,840 
105,000 



Blank. 



409,355 



23,440 
4,830 



28,740 
3,000 
6,000 
7,400 
4,840 



.250 



J. MACPHERSON, Lt.rColonel, 
Director of Stores and Keeper of Militia Properties. 



31 



5G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



A. 189c 



[B.] 

Small Arm Ammunition issued on repayment from the 1st January 

to 30th June, 1892. 



Military Districts. 



Military District No. 1, London 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



2, Toronto 

3, Kingston 

4, Ottawa 

5-6, Montreal 

7, Quebec 

8, St. John, N.B 

9, Halifax, N.S 

10, Winnipeg 

11, Victoria, B.C 

12, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 



Rounds. 



Total 



11,500 
24,000 

3,000 
21,975 

9,000 
20,000 

8,750 
16,870 
20,570 
10,475 

4,500 



150,640 



Amount. 



1 cts. 


190 00 I 


394 80 


48 00 


618 63 | 


164 00 1 


284 00 1 


168 80 


279 52 ( 


326 90 | 


168 00 


76 00 j 



2,718 65 I 



Snider— Ball 

Blank 

Martini-Henry— Ball. 
Revolver — (Jolts ... 

Aiming tube 

Magazine Rifle 



Total. 



Rounds. 

118,770 

600 

25,470 

100 

5,000 

700 

150,640' 



J. MACPHERSON, Lt.-Colonel, 
Director of Stores and Keeper of Militia Properties. 



32 



Militia anil Defence. 



[C] 
Keturn of Gunpowder and Friction Tubes for Practice and Salutes from 
the 1st January to 30th June, 1892. 



.Military 
Districts. 



No. 



2.. 



No. 
Nos. 

No. 



6&G 

7. . . . 
S. . . . 
!).... 
10... 
12. 



Stations. 



Corps. 



( run- 
powder. 



Toronto Field Batteries of Artillery 

Kingston Field and Garrison Batteries of Artillery, Royal Mili 

tary College and Royal School of Artillery 

Ottawa 'Field Batteries of Artillery and Salutes 

Montreal Field and Garrison Batteries of Artillery and Salutes 

Quebec do do 

St. John, N.B . do do 

Halifax, X.S . . . . Garrison Artillery and Salutes 

Winnipeg. ... Winnipeg Field Battery and Salutes 

Charlottetown . . Garrison Artillery and Salutes 



Total. 



Lbs 



l.^o- 



3,614} 



Friction 
Tubes. 



No. 



1,035 



1,011£ 


1,015 


320 


l ;>;> 


121 


25 


82 


45 


100 


110 


30 


15 


300} 


439 


800 


90 



2,959 



J. MACPHERSON, Lt.-Colonel, 
Director of Stores and Keeper of Militia Properties. 



33 



19—3 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 189: 
[D.] — Return of Ordnance in possession of the Militj 


43 


Station. 


Guns-^Field, Siege and GarrisJ 


Rifled. 


Smo< 


Wrought-iron. 


Cast- 
iron, 
convrtd 


' Bronze. 




Breech - 
loading. 


Muzzle-loading. 


ft 

eh 

1 


i 


1 
10 


ft 


+3 

a 

ss 

ft 

ri 

ih 

2 
1 


ft 


24-p 

i 

I'll 
, c 
o a 

!M - 


Military Distric 


i 




U 
ft 




rd 



1- 


ft 
3i 


i 
50 


o 






i 
i 


X 

so 



a 

X 


ft 

t- 

2 


+3 

> 



3 
1 

4 
1 


43 

O 


1 




4 . 


2 


Store charge 

Charge of City 

Guelph, 1st Brigade Field Artillery. . 

Goderich Garrison Battery 

Sarnia do 

do Charge of Town 

Stratford do 

Gait do 

Kincardine do 

Toronto Drill Shed 

Field Battery 












s 

1 
1 

4 






Charge of City 

Store charge 




'2 










York Pioneers 

Old Fort 

New do 

Hamilton Field Battery 






Drill Shed 

Charge of City 

Port Colborne, Welland Canal Field 
Battery 














Sault Ste. Marie Mountain Battery. . 
Lundy's Lane 














'.'. J. 

■i . 1 
li . 1 
1 . 

2 
1 

V 

! 


3 


Durham Field Battery 












4 

4 

4 

2 
4 

4 
4 








1 

i 








'2 
•• 

;; 


'4 

2 


9 




4 


( 'obourg Garrison Battery 

Port Hope do 

Trenton do 

Kingston Field Battery 

Charge of City 

Store Charge 

Tete 'lu Tout Barracks. 








1 


1 
1 


Fori 1 [enry 








Fort Frederick 










<lo Tower . 

Murnej do 

Shoal do .... 

Eas1 Branch do 

West do do .... 

Cedar Island do 

Roj al M ilitary ( 'ollege. . . . 
< rananoque Field Battery, . . 


6 




i 






Brocks ill<', ( iharge of ( Jity 

< Ottawa Field Battery . . . 

Charge-of city 

Store charge 

Nepean Poinl 

Time < run 

Montreal Field Battery. 












5&6 
































14 





































Militia and 1 Hence. 



id in Dominion Store charge, on 30th June, 1892. 



st-mm. 



32-pr. 



8-in.l 









£ 5; -5 £ 

o Wo o 

CO ">C -t< 

» »o o 



19-3J 



" 



CARRONADKf 

Cast-ikon. 



EOWITZEB 



PQ 



3.S 



3, 3 



12 2 



MfoRTAR8, 

Oast-iron. 



10-in. 



- 



2.1 



Remarks. 



Col. Gzowski, 1 32-pr. 



1 4-pr., bronze, Glengarry, 
do Perth. 

[Ottawa. 
do Military Museum, 



35 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19 
[D.] — Return of Ordnance in 


• 

) 

possession 


A. 1891 

of the Milil 


■+3 

a 

'u 

s 


Station. 


Guns— Field, Siege and Gakbim 


Rifled. 


Sin . 


Wrought-iron. 


Cast- 
iron, 
convrtd 


Bronze. 






Breech- 
loading. 


Muzzle-loading. 


p. 
;; 


u 

cc 


di 


H 

2 

.. 

'.. 

.. 
.. 


t 
o 

~r 
cc 

1' 
2 

3 
2 


QC 


24 

71 ' 

i ! 

i ' 

* |i 

* * 1 


ri- 


r-i 


i 

71 


— 

i 
i 


4 


OS 

4 

4 




00 


- 
di 


6 


i 
i 

— 

i 


I 

A 


a 

X 

i 

•• 


i 


1 
O 
X 

re 

3 

•• 

1 

•• 

i 

3 


+3 

> 
o 
N 

-f 

2 

4 
1 

8 

1 


7 






Charge of City 

Gran by, Shefford Field Battery. ..... 








St. John Garrison Battery. ... 

Quebec Field Battery 












Citadel 


































Richmond do 










2 
L 

l 

1 


4 


:: 




:: 


1 
1 

2 
2 

2 


" 
" 














Parade Ground 

Field Battery 

City lines : — 

Upper Casemate ... 

St. Louis Curtain 

do Bastion 

Ursulines' Curtain 

do Bastion 

St. John do 






-. 


i 


.. 




Armoury Battery No. 1 

do 2 . .. 
Artillery Barracks 








"i 

;; 


Towers, No. 1 

2 

3 

Nunnery Battery, No. 1 

do 2 

Montcalm Battery 

1 [ope < S-ate do 

Half Moon do 

St, Charles do 

sembly do 

' rrand do 






;; 


ol t < ratedo . . 

Wolfe's do 

< larronade do 

" E " Magazine Yard 

1 1 nder 1 >ufferin Terrace. . 

Artillery Park 

No. I Fort 








■ 


i 
l 

l 










2 do 

8 do 

[aland of ' Orleans 










Quebec, Store charge 










1 








[ale 






































































: 


6 





































Militia and Defence. 

j (1 in Dominion Store charge, &c. — Continued. 





( Iarronadks 

Cast- 1 kon. 


Howitzer 


Mortars, 

( lAST tRON. 


"3 

— 

u 

«s 

'J 

1 


2 


Remarks. 








- 


X 

1 

4 

1 

:: 

:: 

i 

8 

['. 


"M 


23 

1 
3 

S 

■4 

« 

2 

4 

' | 
2 

■ 
2 

5 


I 

\ ' 

;; 

2 

1 

1 


| 


9 c 


s 

M 

X 

1 
1 


1(1 i. 


. 


O 


(-t-ircii. 






-'1 

;; 


I 
4 


a 
10 

2 

i 
i 

• • 

i 

• • 

:: 

.. 
.. 
.. 

2 




X 

i 

3 


1 



l-H 


1 

O 

OO 

2 

;; 

• • 
1 

i 
4 


4J 

-M 
-t 

s 

'2 

'2 

!! 


82-pr. 




S-in. 


| 

1* 


- 


- 
- 

:: 

:: 


s 

u 

z 

X 

— 


-J 

I 

-: 

3 

:: 

■• 

1 

.. 

1 

2 
1 
21 

.. 

.. 

17 


♦3 

O 


-J 

• 

:: 


-r 
it 



1 

i 

" 

" 
• 





37 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 
]D.] — Eeturn of Ordnance 


19.) 

in 


possession 


A. 18 

of the Mil 


: 
U 


.2 
"S 
•u 

s 

>> 

Si 

cS 


Station. 


Guns— Field, Siege and Gars 


; 


Rifled. 


Sir 




1 Cast- 
Wrought-iron. 1 iron, 
Jconvrtd 


Bronze. 






Breech- 
loading. 


Muzzle-loading. 


CO 

'8 


ft 

CO 

'4 


OS 

_ 
6 


ft 

i—i 


4a 

O 
CO 

i-' 

ft 

3 

2 


ft 

00 


24 

t ! 
o 

. . . 
.. . 




ft 


ft 


i 


d 




! 

■ 


a 

on 


o 
as 


ft 

CM 

~+ 
so 


ft 

X 

«c 
pd 

o 


-a 
o 


i 


43 

a 

i 


1 

o 


r 

f ■ 


' 8 


Gaspe Garrison Battery 

Quebec, Charge of City 

Newcastle Field Battery 






4 
4 






Woodstock . 












••<■• 




Dorchester Penitentiary 
































5 










Carleton Tower 

Drill Shed. .. 

Fairville 

Fort Howe 

Red Head 

Partridge Island 

Dorchester Battery 

Drill Shed 

Chatham 




" 














1 

2 






i 






2 
2 

1 


St. Andrews 












































'" 




St. George 

Fredericton 






























2 

2 






2 

1 










9 


Halifax, N.S., Drill Shed 

Point Pleasant 

Pictou 




















4 
2 








1 




Granville 






























Digby 




















2 












" 














Lunenburg . . . 






















Yarmouth 












































Sydney, C.B 










3 
























i 




.. 








Herring Cove 










i 




Chester .' 














































Liverpool 














































10 


Winnipeg Field Battery 












1 


*3 
1 


!.]!! 

M 


23 


1 


• • 

1 


2 


2 
14 


14 


29 


2 


21 


in 




17 4 


.. 


11 


Store charge 

Victoria, B.C 
















Finlayson Point. . . . 


















Esquimalt, Macaulay Point 
















L 


Brothers Island 














2 
6 




New Westminster 

Prince Edward Island 

Victoria Barracks 








2 
6 


10 


SI 




Fort Edward 

Drill Shed 

( S-eorgetown 

Total 


6 


2 


l 


3 


1 


_ 























































38 





i in 


Domin 


ion 


Stor 


e < 


Milii 
jharge, < 


;ia 
fec- 


and Defence 

-Conclude* f. 










Carronadks 

Cast- ikon. 


How 


TZBB 


MORTABS, 

( 'A. ST IKON. 




a 

r 

•J 

s 

y 

— 


■J 

d 
' / 

pi 


Rbmabks. 


wt-iron. 


~ 

H 


X 

H 

" 
•• 

16 




M 

•• 


38 


- 
PC 

1 


'2 

13 


• 





}. 

1 
12 


10-ii 


1. 

5 

4 


*9 

O 


:V2 \n: 


h 

ft 

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Militia Properties. 



Militia and Defence. 



APPENDIX No. 3 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 

OF 

MILITIA AND DEFENCE. 



REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT— ENGINEER BRANCH. 

Department of Militia and Defence, 

Ottawa, 30th June, 1892. 

Sir, — In the absence of the Chief Architect, I have the honour to transmit here- 
with the report upon the works and repairs made to the Military buildings and 
fortifications under control of this Department from the 1st of January last to date. 

LONDON ROYAL SCHOOL OF INFANTRY. 

The plumbing and water supply pipes were overhauled and repaired. 
The usual amount of lumber and hardware was supplied for petty repairs done 
by the artificers of the school. 

TORONTO. 

New Fort Barracks. — A hot water heating apparatus was placed in the Captains' 
Quarters. The sinks in the Butler's pantry were altered and repaired, and new shelves 
were placed in the Officers' Quarters. 

One room in the married Officers' Quarters had the plaster and floor repaired. 

One room in the married men's Quarters was re-floored and a new floor was 
placed in the ablution room. 

A post and rail fence was placed around the parade ground. 

The usual amount of lumber and hardware was supplied for the general petty 
repairs made by the men of the school. 

Old Fort. — The city water supply was introduced throughout the Old Fort, 
and hydrants were placed for fire protection. 1,554 feet of fencing was put up along 
the Garrison road, and the dead trees were renewed both along the road and in the 
old Military Cemetery. 

BEAMSVILLE. 

The Drill Shed was re-shingled, the defective sheeting made good, the sill renewed 
,in part, and the building put in a good general state of repair. 

CAYUGA. 

Some repairs were made to the doors and windows of the Drill Shed, and a drain 
made around the shed to carry off the water which used to find its way in. The roof 
of this Shed requires re-shingling very badly. 

STEWARTON. 

The Drill Shed at this place was put in proper repair. 

41 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 1893 



GEORGETOWN. 

The Drill Shed roof was re-shingled and several minor repairs made to the shed 
to put it in a proper state of repair. 

KINGSTON. 

Tite de Pont Barracks. 

"D" Qrs. in Block " B " were overhauled and put in repair, owing to a fir< 
having occurred in these Quarters. 

A drain was put in from the Eiding School to the street. The drains in place* 
were overhauled and made good. The floor of the Quarter-master's Store was relaid 
and a dry earth closet put in. Several minor repairs to the buildings generally 
were made by the men of the Battery. 

Wire screens were placed to the windows of the Drill Shed for protection of the 
glass. 

A few general and minor repairs were made to the fortifications generally. 

ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE. 

General repairs were made to doors, windows, floors, gas pipes, water pipes anc 
drains on the usual monthly Barrack inspection report. 

PERTH. 

Drill Shed. — Slight repairs were made to this Shed and drain built to carry of 
the surface water from it. 

OTTAWA. 

Military Stores. — New cupboards and shelving were put in for the proper storing 
of clothing, &c. A new sidewalk was kid from Sappers' Bridge to the Stores an< 
the fence straightened. The shed at the rear was boarded in on account of the 
danger from the sparks of passing vessels blowing in. 

Drill Shed. — The Armoury doors were all painted and minor repairs made tc 
the shed. 

Cartier Square. — The weeds were all cleared out and grass seed sown. 

The drains were overhauled and cleaned. 

The caretaker's house at Nepean Point had the gutters and fall pipes repaired) 
and the caretaker's house at the Eifle Eange had sundry minor repairs to prevent if 
from falling. 

MONTREAL. 

Drill Shed. — The roof and skylight was repaired and made water-tight. 
The Armoury of the 5th Eoyal Scots was altered to admit of greater conveniens 
to that Corps. 

Eifle Eange. — The usual repairs to the ditches and fences were carried out. 

ST. JOHNS, P.Q. 

Infantry Barracks.— The plumbing in the Officers' and married Quarters waj 
overhauled and made good and new water-closets of a modern kind put in. 

The Captain's Quarters was overhauled and made clean. 

The Water service was extended to the old Hospital building now occupied a 
married Quarters. 

The eavetrouffha and fall pipes were repaired on all the buildings. 

A new Rifle RaDge was fitted up for the use of the men of the School and th 
Annual Camps. 

42 



Militia and Defence. 



ISLE AUX NOIX. 

The old bridge leading to the Island was put in proper repair. All the drains 
on the Island were opened up and overhauled for the better preservation of* the 
building. 

QUEBEC. 

Citadel. — The water pipes having frozen in places were repaired and made 
serviceable. The old fence around the glacis was repaired. 

A large amount of new flooring was laid in the Casemates. 

The drain from the King's Bastion was overhauled and renewed. 

The chimneys of the Casemates were rebuilt and repaired where required. 

Some new floors were laid in the Stables and the Stable slightly repaired. 

The Commandants quarters was papered and painted and the plaster repaired. 

Some new floors and slight repairs were made to the Officers' Mess establishment. 

Some alterations were made on sanitary grounds in the Adjutants' quarters. 

Cavalry Barracks. — A new platform was laid along the front of the Stables and a 
new door was broken through to the same. 

Cartridge Factory. — A new floor was laid in the engine-rooms. 

All the plumbing was overhauled on sanitary grounds and two new water-closets 
put in besides repairing the old ones. 

The sidewalks fronting the Government property on St. Louis, St. Genevieve, 
Palace, and Arsenal streets were repaired. 

A new range was built on the Island of Orleans for the purpose of testing gun- 
powder. 

LEVIS. 

No. 1 Fort. — Part of the wooden coping along the walls was renewed. The 
damage caused by the winter frost at the Levis rifle range was repaired. 

Eoyal Engineer Camp. — The caretaker's house was raised, new sills placed under, 
and the roof re-shingled. All the broken glass of the huts were repaired. 

FREDERICTON. 

Infantry Barracks. — A new foundation was built under the guard-room and the 
walls repaired. All the barrack rooms were cleaned and kalsomined. Window 
shades were supplied for the windows. A new fence was built around the Park 
Barracks. 

ST. JOHN, N. B. 

The caretaker's house at the Tower was repaired and new sills put under. 

A new store building was put up in Fort Dufferin and the old store moved back 
and repaired. The parapets, embrasures, gun racers and fences at Fort Dufferin 
were all repaired. 

The side-arm shed and embrasures at Dorchester Battery were repaired. A drain 
also was placed around the magazine and the magazine door was repaired. The 
caretaker's house at Fort Howe was repaired and put in"good order. ^JTfj 

The fence at Red Head Battery was repaired, and the rifle range repaired and 
put in good order. 

HALIFAX. 

Owing to the burning of the Halifax Drill Shed, there was a temporary building 
erected for the storing of the arms and accoutrements of the Halifax Garrison 
Artillery. 

43 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 19.) A. 1893 



VICTORIA, B.C, 

" C " Battery Barracks. — The fireplaces in the Barracks rooms were repaired J 

New eavetroughs and fall pipes were put up and painted. A new box drain waa 
put in. The recreation hall was clean and painted. Lumber and shingles were proJ 
vided, and the men of the Battery performed the labour of the general repairs to the 
Barracks. 

There were five back doors and cutting of wall for the same, also five inside! 
doors made in married quarters. New water-closets were built and painted. 

A new flag-staff was erected and painted, and paints and hardware were pro] 
vided for uecessary general repairs at the Barracks. 

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. 

Victoria Barracks. — The roof of the Barracks was painted. New gates wera| 
put in and several minor and necessary repairs were made. 

I havo the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

FEED. W. WHITE, Lieutenant, 

Acting Architect. 
The Deputy Minister 

of Militia and Defence, 
Ottawa. 



44 






Militia and I lefence. 



APPENDIX No. 4 

TO 

REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 

OF 

MILITIA AND DEFENCE. 



Half-year ended 30th June, 1892. 



GOVERNMENT CARTRIDGE FACTORY. 

Quebec, 19th October, 1892. 

Sir, — In accordance with your memorandum of the 8th October instant, I have 
the honour to report on ODerations at the Government Cartridge Factory, from 1st 
December, 1891, to 30th June, 1892, as follows: — 

The manufacture of Snider ball ammunition which had been continued after 1st 
December last, was interrupted in January, 1892, and the manufacture of Martini- 
Henry rolled s'ervice ball cartridges mark III, for which raw material and R. F. 
G. 2 Powder had been received from England during the summer of 1891, was begun. 

This manufacture was not pushed on rapidly at first, as operatives had to be 
broken in and machinery adjusted to perfect the work. The appointed quantity of 
337,000 rouuds to be fabricated, was, however, got through, and from tests carried 
out and the shooting since done with this ammunition by marksmen on different 
ranges, it appears to have given quite satisfactory results, comparing well, on all 
points, with the imported ammunition. 

Early in May, 1892, the manufacture of Snider ball was resumed and continued 
at a rate which would ensure the appointed annual supply being forthcoming at the 
end of the year. 

From 1st December, 1891, to 30th June, 1892,303,000 rounds of Snider ball 
ammunition were manufactured, and since 30th June last to present date, 838.000 
more were made. 

I expect that by the 1st December, 1892, the output for the year will have 
reached 1,800,000 rounds of Martini-Henry and Snider ball ammunition. This will 
exceed the production of several years back, and could be increased still more with 
very beneficial results in lowering cost price. 

The powder for this supply of Snider ammunition was obtained from Curtiss <& 
Harvey, and passed inspection under War Office authorities in England as service- 
able. I also tested this powder after being stored in Quebec, and found it suitable 
for use in the manufacture of Snider ball ammunition. It was high in velocity but 
not much higher than previous lots received which had in previous years given 
satisfaction, and equal in every other respect to previous lots obtained from the same 
manufacturers. As regards accuracy it was also equal to the general results 
obtained in previous years. It would, however, be satisfactory to obtain from the 
War Office authorities copies of records of proof and figures of merit obtained in 
tests of powder conducted for us under their supervision. These results have not 
been communicated lately to this office as was done at first. 

45 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 19.) 



A. 1893 



The more extended use of Marti ni-Henry rifles throughout the force, points out 
to an increased demand for Martini-Henry ammunition, and it is satisfactory to be 
in position to state that this more modern and accurate nature of ammunition can be 
manufactured successfully in this factory. 

During winter extensive experiments were carried out at the Cove Fields gun! 
butts, by Captain Thomson, R.A., with the new smokeless powder of the British ser- 
vice, termed " cordite." 

These experiments gave very satisfactory results, and in rifles this explosive 
gives very uniform ballistic results, and accuracy of practice on -range was remark- 
able. 

It would be worth considering if a new small-bore rifle could not be obtained' 
by converting Martini-Henry rifles into Martini-Metford, substituting a small bore 
barrel to the present *45" calibre, without altering the breech and lock mechanism, ' 
replacing, however, the " fore-end " of wood by one of a shape suitable to take the! 
small bore barrel, and altering some minor parts. A pattern has been sealed to 
convert Martini-Henry carbines in this manner for artillery and cavalry service in 
England. Thus a good and stout small-bore rifle would be obtained, and if at any! 
future time the Lee-Metford magazine rifle was introduced, both arms would be 
available, taking the same ammunition. The converted Martini rifle would shoot asi 
far and as accurately as the Lee-Metford rifle of the British service. It would be a| 
single loader but still much more accurate and far ranging than the Martini-Henry, 
with a practically much longer point-blank range, and a hardly perceptible recoil,; 
instead of the violent one now felt when firing the Martini-Henry rifle. 

The manufacture of artillery projectiles has been carried out during the period) 
of the year above mentioned. During that period, viz., from 1st December, 1891, | 
to 30th June, 1892, the following number and descriptions of artillery projectiles! 
have been manufactured : — 

9-pr. common shells, 482. 

9-pr. shrapnel, 30V. 

H4-pr. common shells, 358. 

Besides, 400 64-pr. shrapnels were in hand and a quantity of other shells in dif-j 
ferent stages of manufacture. A good deal of time was lost in the shell shop, help- 
ing to make Martini-Henry cartridge machinery. This reduced the expected out-; 
put. Several improvements in mode of manufacture have been adopted with a view! 
of reducing cost price. However, the greatest obstacle to cheap production 
in this branch is the limited output authorized. Staff wages are nearly the same 
whether making one thousand or five thousand shells, and the general expenditure] 
is, in the latter case, considerably reduced. 

The present output could not, however, be increased to a great extent withot 
enlarging the shell finishing shop, which was adapted to its present work from wh? 
was only a repair shop. If an extension was thought advisable and an increase al 
of engine power, which would be then needed, authorized, I am ready to submit! 
necessary data as to buildings, machinery, and extra power required. If, howevei 
no Mich changes were contemplated, and we kept to present means of manufacturing 
1 would still have to urge the necessity of obtaining a more powerful drillii 
machine than such as we have at present. This would expedite manufacture at 
allow the appointed number of shells to be manufactured annually, of which ther< 
is an appearance of running short, situated as we are at present. 

The raw material for the years' 1892-93 consumption, was duly received in go( 
order, and examined carefully. 

A lot of cast iron was rejected, to be replaced by a similar quantity of pro] 
quality. 

No action has yet been taken as regards scrap metal which has accumi 
lated since over a Tear. I beg to draw attention to this, and to request that 
early decision may be arrived at, if possible, as it takes much store and yard rooi 
besides scrap iron getting deteriorated by the weather. 



46 



Militia and Defence. 



The personnel of the Factory has remained the same during the period between 
I he 1st December, 1891, and 30th June, 1892, with the exception of a few additional 
Imperatives being taken on, at piece work prices, to increase the output of small arm 
immunition, which would otherwise have run short of requirements. 

I have to bring to notice that the office staff is not apparently able to meet the 
Barren t business of the Factory. 

Very few repairs to buildings had been done at the date of 30th June, 1892. 

The flooring in some parts of the Factory requires still repairs, which were 
estimated for last spring. 

In view of the danger of contagious disease spreading next summer, I would 
point out that my suggestions of last year be considered, as to the advisability of 
improving the sanitary condition of the Factory by removing and replacing old 
closets by more modern and perfected appliances, and providing lavatories, &c, for 
which estimates were submitted. 

A range at the Island of Orleans was prepared in June last for testing gun- 
powder. It was satisfactory, except, however, the gun platform, which was too 
weak, and will have to be rclaid properly. These tests can now be safely and 
conveniently carried out there. 

With reference to these tests, I would point out that small lots of powder 
ordered, entailed as much trouble and expense to test them as large ones, and when 
possible, large lots should be ordered. Much time is taken for those experiments, 
which is diverted from regular work, apart from increasing the expenditure of this 
Factory, without any allowance being made in accounts for this service. 

The machinery in use in this Factory, similar to that used for same purpose in 
Imperial Arsenals, has always been, and is still of a kind suitable for the manufacture 
of built up small arm ammunition. 

Very few improvements could be effectuated in this machinery, whilst the 
ammunition now in demand is to be produced. Solid drawn brass cartridges would 
require quite different machinery, in fact, very nearly an entirely new plant for the 
small arms now in use. It may appear a doubtful advantage to adopt a more 
expensive, and what has not proved to be a much more efficient kind of ammunition. 
Moreover, large bore rifles are everywhere giving way to small bore, with composite 
bullets and cartridge cases of an improved pattern, charged with explosives of a 
nature different to what we are using now, and necessitating new machinery 
specially designed for the purpose. 

Our present machinery is still very serviceable for the manufacture of the 
ammunition of the rifles now in use in Canada, and has been kept, all through, in 
very fair order ; the engines and boilers are equal to their present work. The 
boilers have been inspected as usual, during the year, by an authorized boiler 
inspector, and found in a safe condition. The regular certificates have been given 
to that effect. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

OSC. PEEVOST, Major, 

Superintendent, G.G.F. 
To the Deputy Minister 
of Militia and Defence, 
Ottawa. 



17 



Militia and Defence. 

DEPARTMENT 



VIILITIA AND DEFENCE 



DOMINION OF C^N^DA^ 



ESTABLISHMENT LISTS 



OF THE 



ACTIVE MILITIA 



FOR THE 



FINANCIAL YEAR 1893-94. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE QUEEN'S MOST 
EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1893 



Militia and Defence. 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir Frederick Arthur Stanley, Baron 
Stanley of Preston, in the County of Lancaster, in the Peerage of the United 
Kingdom, Knight Grand Cross oj the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Governor- 
General of Canada. 

My Lord, — 

I have the honour to forward to Your Excellency the accompanying Lists of 
Regimental Establishments of the Permanent and Active Militia of the Dominion of 
Canada, for the financial year 1893-94, to be submitted to Parliameat in accordance 
with Order in Council of 29th December, 1892. 

I have the honour to be, 

My Lord, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 



J. C. PATTERSON, 

Minister of Militia and Defence. 



Department of Militia and Defence, 

Ottawa, 3rd March, 1893. 



19fl-lJ 



Militia and Defence. 



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A. 1891 



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Newfoundland and Canada. 



FURTHER PAPERS 

(20d, 20e, 20/.) 

Respecting the enforcement by the Newfoundland Authorities against Cana- 
dian Vessels of the Newfoundland Act respecting the sale of Bait to 
foreign fishins; vessels. 

Ottawa, March, 1893. 



CONTENTS. 

Xo. 19H. Page. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 30th March, 1892. — Acknowledges receipt of despatch 
10th March, 1892, forwarding substance of resolution passed by Legislature of Nova Scotia on 
proposed Convention between Newfoundland and United States 1 

Ko. 199. 

I High Commissioner to Prime Minister, 2nd April, 1892. — Acknowledges receipt of Order in Council 
of 3rd March, 1892, in which he is recommended to discuss the points at issue with Newfound- 
land representative. Has had no instructions, however, and Mr. Harvey had returned to New- 
foundland. Nevertheless, prior to his knowledge of the proposal he had met Mr. Harvey at Mr. 
Pennell's office (at Colonial Office), and discussed question of discrimination. Mr. Harvey asked 
suspension of duties and withdrawal of objection to Bond-Blaine Convention. He was told that 
the latter would involve practical abrogation of Treaty of 1818. Canada's favourable treatment 
of Newfoundland referred to 1 

xo. aoo. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 30th April, 1892.— Forwards Minutes of Council (1098) 
25th April, 1892, referring to a report that in connection with certain proceedings arising out of 
an attempt to test the legality of the imposition of " extra " duties by Newfoundland, the Gov- 
ernment of that colony intended seeking ex post facto legislation. Asks consideration of pro- 
priety of instructing the Newfoundland Government on the subject of such method of legalizing 
post action 2 

Xo. S801. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 25th April, 1892. — Canada has received an unfavourable 
reply from Newfoundland to unconditional proposal of 16th April to resume status quo ; and 
Canadian Government learns of introduction by Newfoundland of discriminating revenue bill, 
containing retroactive provisions to legalize post action. Reservation asked for. Legislation 
against Newfoundland fishermen in Canadian waters may be necessary 3 

Xo. 30». 

, High Commissioner to Prime Minister, 30th April, 1892. — Forwards copy of letter with enclosure 
from Colonial Office, and his reply thereto on the subject of a statement by the Leader of the 
Opposition in Newfoundland Legislature, alleged on his authority, as to the expressed intention 
of Newfoundland to refuse bait to Canadians. Quotes language from his letter to the late 
Premier and unhesitatingly states that it accurately describes what passed at his meeting with 
Mr. Blaine 4 

xo. ao3. 

i Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 19th May, 1892.— Forwards Minute of Council (1162), 
14th May, 1892, dealing with despatch of Lord Knutsford, 9th April, 1892, respecting the 
placing of an exparte case before the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. Every ex- 
pedient had been tried without result. Suggestion of a reference came from Great Britain. 
The consent of Newfoundland does not appear to be necessary. The case is not strictly an 
crparte one, but a question of fact. It could not be put differently for a correct decision. New- 
foundland had disregarded opinion of Law Officers, and refused reference of case. They now 
propose retroactive legislation. Reference of case is recommended 5 

20d, e,/_ a 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20r.) A. 18! 



Xo. 204. pJ 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 17th May, 1892.— Acknowledges Minute of Council 7th 
March. Mr. Harvey having returned to Newfoundland, Conference no longer practicable. 
Views as to discrimination already expressed in despatch 26th March, 1892 

Xo. 205. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 25th May, 1892.— Forwards Minute of Council (1143), 
18th May, 1892, dealing with despatch from Sir Terence O'Brien (Enclosure No. 1) 18th April, 
1SU2, as to statement attributed to the Leader of the Opposition in Newfoundland Legislature, 
alleged on the authority of Sir Charles Tupper as to expressed intention of Newfoundland to 
exclude Canadians from bait privileges. The Leader of the Opposition quoted from a letter 
from Sir Charles Tupper to the late Sir J. A. Macdonald detailing the substance of a conversa- 
tion exchanged with Hon. J. G. Blaine. The phraseology of Mr. Bond's despatch calculated to 
mislead. A correct presentment suggests conditional action. At all events Newfoundland had 
already excluded Canada prior to the date of conversation. No question of intention could 
therefore arise . , 

Xo. 206. 

High Commissioner for Canada to the Prime Minister, 18th May, 1892. —Encloses a cutting from the 
Times newspaper, announcing statement by the Under Secretary for Foreign Affairs in the 
House of Commons to the effect that the proposed convention between Newfoundland and the 
United States would not be approved, and that negotiations must proceed pari passu with 
similar ones between Canada and the United States. Reports a conversation with Lord Knuts- 
ford in which his lordship expressed the hope that nothing would be done in the way of re- 
taliating to retard Newfoundland joining the Dominion 

Xo. 207. 

Hon. A. G. -Tones to Hon. Charles H. Tupper, 18th May, 1892. — Asks how many trap net licenses 
were issued to Newfoundlanders on Canadian Labrador during 1891 

Xo. 208. 

Hon. Charles H. Tupper to Hon. A. G. Jones, 20th May, 1892. — Enquiry is being made to answer 
definitely about Labrabor licenses 

Xo. 200. 

Deputy-Minister of Marine and Fisheries to Commander Wakeham, 20th May, 1892. — Call at 
Esquimalt Point for instructions re cod traps 

Xo. 210. 

Hon. Charles H. Tupper to Commander Wakeham, 21st May, 1892. — States that status quo of 1889 
will be reverted to between Canada and Newfoundland ; and directs a fair division of trap 
licenses between fishermen of both countries and Labrador . 

Xo. 211. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 21st May, 1892. — Communicates message from Gov- 
ernor of Newfoundland, agreeing to revert to the status quo of 1889 for the 'current year (1892) . . 

Xo. 212. 

Sir Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 21st May, 1892. — Newfoundland Government agrees 
to revert (pending conference) to status quo of 1889 for current year (1892). Additional duties 
will be removed on receipt of intimation that Canada has removed duties on Newfoundland 
I >i < ducts 

Xo. 213. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien, 22nd May, 1892. — Message received with satisfac- 
tion. Proclamation suspending duties on Newfoundland fish and fish products is being prepared, 
bul under statute it should recite that Newfoundland duties had been reduced. Announcement 
of removal by Newfoundland hoped for, when arrangement will be made to effect complete re- 
ciprocity.. 

Xo. 211. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 22nd May, 1892.— Replies to 21st May, 1892. Can- 
ada bad received message from Newfoundland with satisfaction, and had answered that 
proclamation suspending duties on fish and fish products was being prepared. Arrangements 
would be made to effeel complete reciprocity in remission of duties, when announcement 
ed '•' removal of additional duties by Newfoundland 

Xo. 215. 

Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries to Commander Wakeham, 23rd May, 1892.— License book 
not defining licenses to Newfoundlanders, state those issued to them in 1891 

Xo. 21C. 

So Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 23rd May, 1S92.— As duties come on automatically 
under Revenue Act when imposed on fish by Canada, they will be removed in "Same manner 
when taken off by Canada 



Newfoundland nnd Canada. 



No. 217. Page. 

.id Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien, 24th May, 1892. Could not a formal notice of 
intention to remove duties reriproeally In- aeeepted as sufficient on )><>th sides to remove deadlock. 13 

Xo. 21*. 

: Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 24th May, 1892. — If any difficulty be anticipated 
both Governments could fix on date for removal simultaneously of imposition of duties on re- 
use products 13 

Xo. 919. 

iraman der Wakehani to Deputy-Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 24th May, 1892. — Gives names 

ight Newfoundlanders to whom licenses on Canadian Labrador were issued in 1891 14 

Xo. 220. 

ice O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 25th May, 1892. — A mutual notice agreed to remove 
duties on and after Friday, 27th May, 1892. Proclamation will issue on reply 14 

Xo. 221. 

trd Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien, 26th May, 1892. — Dominion Government agree to 
remove duties on and after Friday, 27th May, 1892, on understanding Newfoundland does like- 
wise same day, and also removes restrictions as to bait fishes. Proclamation will issue to-mor- 
row afternoon on assumption of agreement being carried out by Newfoundland 14 

Xo. 222. 

■ Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 27th May, 1892. — States that notice removal duties 
and granting bait licenses to Canadians on same terms as Newfoundland fishermen to be 
gazetted 27th May, 1892 14 

Xo. 223. 

rd Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien, 27th May, 1892. — Expressing thanks for telegrams. 
Proclamation passed Council, and will be gazetted to-morrow 14 

Xo. 224. 

id Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 27th May, 1892. — Repeats telegram sent to Governor of 
Newfoundland, 26th May, as to removal of restrictions by respective Governments simul- 
taneously 15 

Xo. 225. 

rd Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford, 28th May, 1892. — Expresses the hope that retroactive 
legislation will not be allowed to pass without reservation 15 

Xo. 220. 

rd Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 30th May, 1892. — Expresses satisfaction of Her 
Majesty's Government at arrangement arrived at with Newfoundland 15 

Xo. 227. 

rd Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien, 30th May, 1892. — Expresses satisfaction at concilia- 
tory attitude and makes certain overtures regarding the arrangement for a Conference 15 

Xo. 22 H. 

rd Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 31st May, 1892.— Referring to telegram of 28th May. 
Governor of Newfoundland has been informed that the Queen may be advised to allow retro- 
spective provisions regarding Customs duties, but not license fees under Bait Act 16 

Xo. 229. 

rd Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 31st May, 1892.— Referring to telegrams, 25th April, 
30th April and 28th May, 1892, respecting Newfoundland Revenue Bill. The clause providing 
for discriminating duties on Canadian goods included in every Newfoundland Act since 1885, in 
view of duty imposed by Dominion Customs Act. Her Majesty's Government unable to instruct 
reservation of Bill. Pending negotiations should arrange difficulties. Retrospective provisions 
regarding bait license fees must be reserved unless accompanied by suspending clause 16 

Xo. 230. 

mite of Council, 6th June, 1892 (1122 H).— Dealing with Colonial Office despatch, 26th March, 
1892. (No. 190 preceding papers.) The Newfoundland Tariff Act was held to be discriminative, 
and past action of Newfoundland renders Canadian Government naturally apprehensive of legis- 
lation giving such power 17 

Xo. 231. 

uute of Council, 6th June, 1892 (1194 H).— Dealing with a despatch from the High Commissioner 
for Canada, 30th April, 1892, covering correspondence (see enclosures in No. 202) on the preceding 
subjects of his interview with Mr. Blaine at Washington, 1891, and language used with regard 
to Newfoundland's intention to exclude Canada from bait supply. Recommending that copies 

be sent to Governor of Newfoundland , 20 

iii 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 181 



Ko. 333. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien, 11th June, 1892. — Forwarding despatch with en- 
closures received from the High Commissioner for Canada on the subject of the alleged state- 
ment regarding the intention of Newfoundland to exclude Canadians from bait privileges 

So. 333. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 17th June, 1892. — Reason to believe Newfoundland 
prefers Canada as a meeting place for Conference 

No. 334. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 21st June, 1892. — Acknowledging receipt of despatch 
19th May, 1892, (No. 203 preceding). Since that date a considerable change has taken place in 
the attitude of Newfoundland and it is hoped the friendly discussion which is to take place 
will result in a permanent and satisfactory arrangement. Her Majesty's Government think it 
advisable to take no further steps as to the submission to a Committee of the Privy Council of 
the question of the legality of Newfoundland's action in refusing bait to Canadians 

No. 335. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston, 6th July, 1892. — Referring to telegram 31st May, 1892, 
(No. 229 preceding) although unable to authorize proclamation of legislation sanctioning collec- 
tion of bait license fees, 1890. His Lordship suggests that Canadian Government should with- 
draw action for recovery of sums collected ; the sums being trifling in the aggregate. Such 
action would find favour 

No. 336. 

Sir F. B. T. Carter to Lord Stanley of Preston, 12th July, 1892.— Acknowledges No. and 

enclosures in relation to the statement alleged to have been made by Sir Charles Tupper re- 
specting the exclusion of Canadians from British privileges in Newfoundland , 

No. 337. 

The Marquis of Ripon to Lord Stanley of Preston, 26th August 1892. — Acknowledging despatch of 
30th June forwarding Minute of Council, 6th June, 1892. Contentions raised not assented 
to and have already been dealt with. There was some misunderstanding between the Minister 
of Marine and Fisheries and the Newfoundland delegate respecting the mode of enacting the 
Newfoundland Revenue Bill of 1891 . . 

Ido. 338. 
Minute of Council, 12th Sept., 1892 (1317 H).— Dealing with CO. despatch, 6th July, 1892 (No. 233 
preceding). Regarding the suggested withdrawal of the suits for the recovery of the license fees 
under Bait Act, the Canadian Government were under moral obligation to the litigants, and 
unless prepared to assume liability of Newfoundland, the Government cannot well recede from 
what they have been advised was a just and legal claim, although anxious to promote good 
feeling , 

No. 339. 

Administrator of Newfoundland to Lord Stanley of Preston, 15th September, 1892. — Enquiring as 
to earliest date for a meeting at Halifax 

Xo. 340. 

Minute of Council, 23rd September, 1892. — A deputation from Canadian Government can meet 
Newfoundland delegation at Halifax any time after 10th October, 1892 

Mo. 341. 

Minute of Council, 23rd September, 1892.— Appointing the Minister of Militia and Defence, the 
Minister of Customs and the Minister of Marine and Fisheries a deputation to confer with dele- 
gates from Newfoundland 

No. 343 . 

Sir T<-r< n< - O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 25th October, 1892.— Delegation from Newfound- 
land purpose leaving on November 2nd, by Allan mail steamer 

No. 343. 

Minute of Council, 29th October, 1892 (1289 H).— The Government of Newfoundland still declining 
to entertain the claim of Mr. Henry Dicks in regard to the schooner "Hattie" and for a refund 
of Customs duties; the Minister of Justice recommends that the papers connected therewith 
should be referred to the Newfoundland Conference . i* 






NO. 344. 






Minute of ( louncil, 29th October 



room of the Minister . 



ctober, L892. — Appointing the Minister of Justice on the delegation 
if Marine and Fisheries, who is called to England on official business . 



No. 345. 

Bit Ten uoe O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston, 5th November, 1892.— Delegates start 5th Novem- 
ber,1892 6 



\o. 340. 



Approved report of a < lommittee of Council, 9th December, 1892.— Submitting copy of proceedings 
of the conference at Halifax between the delegates from the Governments of Canada and New- 



foundland . 

iv 



Newfoundland and ( fanada. 



No. 198. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 30th March, 1892. 
Excellency 

The Governor-General in Council, &c, &c., &c. 

My Lord, — T have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch, no. 
the 10th March, forwarding the substance of the resolutions passed by the 
bive assembly of Nova Scotia, respecting the proposed reciprocity convention 
bween Newfoundland and the United States. 

I have, &c, 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 199. 

Victoria Chambers, 17 Victoria Street, 

London, S.W., 2nd April, 1892. 



r Honourable the Premier, 
Ottawa, Canada. 

Sir, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of a copy of the order in 

incil dated 3rd March, 1892, on the subject of the refusal of the government of 

swfoundland to issue bait licenses to Canadian fishermen. I notice in the report 

ned by the minister of justice and the minister of marine and fisheries that it is 

i "inmended, in accordance with a suggestion made by Lord Knutsford, that I should 

i instructed as to the views of the government, and be requested to act, on behalf of 

Dominion, at a conference with a representative from Newfoundland, to discuss the 

I nts at issue between the two colonies. 

I desire to take the opportunity of mentioning that I have not so far received any 
I traction upon the subject. There was some allusion to the matter a little while ago 
(the newspapers, but at the moment I was under the impression that my name had 
I ii used instead of that of the minister of marine and fisheries. I found out 
I >sequently, however, that this was not the case, but, in the meantime, Mr. Harvey, 
I ■ representative of the Newfoundland government, who was in this country at the 

had returned to St. Johns. 

i Before, however, I knew anything at all of the proposal, I met Mr. Harvey at the 

x Stephen's Club in company with Mr. Pennell, the chief clerk of the Canadian de- 

; tnient of the colonial office, and at the request of Mr. Harvey met him at Mr. 

ill's office at the colonial office, and discussed the various points in dispute with 

i i. Mr. Harvey informed me that the Canadian government were altogether under a 

apprehension in supposing that the effect of the Bond-Blaine convention would be to 

1 riininate against the imports of the Dominion, and showed me the new tariff in 

the same reductions were made. I pointed out that I was equally under the im- 

ssion, and quoted the language of the convention, which I contended would still 

hem to make a corresponding reduction below the tariff he showed me. Mr. 

I rvey stated that there was no intention to discriminate against Canada ; but it was 

however, to me that if the convention had gone into operation the United States 

* ild have demanded a reduction in the duties in their favour, equivalent to the ad- 

to be given to them under the proposed treaty. 

Mr. Harvey suggested, in the course of the conversation (and showed me a memor- 

i to that effect), that if Canada would remove her oppositions to the Bond-Blaine 

>tion, and suspend the duties now charged on Newfoundland fish, Canadian vessels 

be allowed to get bait as heretofore, and that the imports from Canada would be 

20d, e,/— 1 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. ■ 



restored to the position they formerly occupied. I could only say to Mr. Harvey th 
thought the initiative lay with them, and that if they would allow Canadian fishen 
to obtain bait, and remove the prohibitory duties on imports from Canada, they wr 
receive equally favourable treatment from the Canadian government, but that the B< 
Blaine convention was a much wider question, and one that could not be adopted w 
out a practical abrogation of the Treaty of 1818. 

I naturally referred to the way in which Canada had been treated by Newfoi 
land, especially in view of the pledges that were given at the time the Bait Act recei 
the royal assent, and of the exceptionally favourable treatment accorded in many I 
to Newfoundland. I expressed the opinion very strongly that I thought it was to 
interest both of Canada and Newfoundland to act together in matters which concer 
British interests in North America, so far as it was possible to do so, and reminded 
that a similar view was expressed by a joint committee, of which he was chairmai 
the legislative council and house of assembly of Newfoundland, appointed to consi 
the subject of the export and sale of bait, when they were seeking the passage of 
Bait Bill of 1886. 

Of course you will understand that this interchange of opinions between 
Harvey and myself was of purely an informal nature, but in view of the order in cou 
referred to above, I think it well to acquaint you with what has taken place. . 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES TUPPER. 



No. 200. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford. 

Government House, Ottawa, 30th April, 1892. 

The Right Honourable 

The Lord Knutsford, G.C.M.G., 
&c, &c, &c. 

My Lord, — With reference to previous correspondence on the subject of the il 
tions between this Dominion and the colony of Newfoundland, I have the honoufc 
forward copy of an order in council embodying a report by the minister of marine I 
fisheries, who represents that he has received information that it is the intention ofni 
district court of that colony to decide that the imposition of extra duties upon Cjt 
diai i goods under the provisions of the Newfoundland Revenue Act was illegal. 

In view of the rumoured intention of the Newfoundland government to enacjj 
post facto Legislation to legalize the exaction of these duties, ministers request that p 
majesty's government be moved to consider the propriety of instructing the govep 
of Newfoundland to refuse her majesty's assent to any such legislation. 

I have, &c, 

STANLEY OF PRESTON. 



[Enclosure 1 in No. 200.] 

CERTIFIED Copy of a report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, ap#) 
by His Excellency the Governor- General in Council on the 25th April-, 1892. 

On ;i report, dated 19th April, 1892, from the minister of marine and fish< 
stating thai important information has reached him touching the relations bet 
Newfoundland and Canada. 

The minister observes that it appears for the purpose of testing the legality ( 
Imposition of the "extra" duties imposed by way of retaliation against Canada, 
certain articles under the (assumed) authority of the Newfoundland Revenue A< 
action was begun in 'Ik- district court of that colony, against the receiver-gener 

2 



Hi 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

back a small amount, within the jurisdiction of that cou; *;, paid under protest in 

PB duties. 

That while, up to the time of the receipt of the information, judgment had not yet 

, n delivered, it was generally understood that although upon a technical point— want 

I notice of action — the plaintiff* would be non-suited, the decision of the court would 

i ablish the principle of the case in favour of the right to recover back the duties. 

The minister observes further that the grounds relied upon for this decision are : — 

i I.) There is a defect in the wording of the section of the Revenue Act, applicable 

[the case. The words " shall be levied, collected and paid'' which follow the words 

he following duties, etc.", have been omitted. 

(2.) The main ground that the fishermen of Canada " have not the privilege of 

fish on all parts of the coasts of the colony," that privilege, a right having been 

from them by the refusal of the government of Newfoundland to issue licenses to 

jnadians for the purpose of catching bait fishes. 

An appeal will, of course, be made from this decision to the supreme court of 

•wfoundland. 

The minister desires to invite attention to the rumoured intention on the part of 

Newfoundland government of introducing into the legislature of that colony an 

, to legalize the imposition of the duties already illegally imposed, and he learns that 

- tion is being taken by certain Canadian importers and shippers in this matter. 

Boon as particulars can be obtained respecting the proceedings referred to they will 

laid before your excellency in council. 

It is hoped that ex post facto legislation touching discrimination or prohibitory 

against Canadian goods will be disallowed by the imperial authorities. 
The minister is not aware of any particular reason for supposing that his excel- 
v the governor of Newfoundland would refuse assent to such a bill, unless some 
i vimis indication of the wishes of her majesty's government in that direction had 
iven. 
The committee, on the recommendation of the minister of marine and fisheries, 
vise that your excellency be moved to forward copy of this minute, if approved, to 
■ right honourable the principal secretary of state for the colonies, for the informa- 
In of her majesty's government, together with a request that her majesty's govern- 
Int be moved to consider the propriety of instructing the governor of Newfoundland 
i;»n the subject. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



No. 201. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford. 

25th April, 1892. 

Canada made unconditional proposal direct to Newfoundland on the. 16th inst., to 
1 nine status quo for this season, to enable efforts for settlement by conference or other- 
tie to be made, and have received an unfavourable reply. 

My government now learn that the government of Newfoundland has introduced 
' enue bill, containing discriminating tariff against Canadian products as before, with 
i material verbal amendment. 

It also contains retroactive provisions which legalize the license fees exacted in 
1 )0 for which Canadians are now, with prospects of success, seeking redress in the 
' '>'ts. They hope earnestly that her majesty's government will have the bill reserved, 
Pp will, while legislation hostile to Canada is continued, decline to sanction it. 

Pressure of public opinion may, it is feared, render necessary legislation respecting 
' ung in our waters similar to that enacted against our fishermen by Newfoundland. 

STANLEY. 
3 
20d f «,/_lJ 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. l c 

No. 202. 

Office of the High Commissioner for Canada, Victoria Chambers, 

17 Victoria Street, London, S.W., 30th April, 1892. 
The Honourable 

The Prime Minister, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit herewith for your information, a copy 
letter, with enclosure, which I have received from the colonial office respecting a s 
ment made in the Newfoundland legislature as to what passed at my interview witb 
Blaine at Washington in April, 1891, together with a copy of my reply. 
I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant, 

CHARLES TUPPER, 

High Commissioner. 



c< 



[Enclosure 1 in No. 202.] 

Colonial Office, S.W., 23rd April, 1892. 
Sir C. Tupper, Bart., G.C.M.G. 

Sir, — I am directed by Lord Knutsford to transmit for your information a { 
phrase of a telegram from the governor of Newfoundland respecting a statement n 
in the Newfoundland legislature as to what passed at your interview with Mr. Bl 
in April, 1891. 

The governor of Newfoundland has been requested by telegraph to repeat 
message to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

I am, etc., 

EDWARD FAIRFIELD. 



[Enclosure 2 in No. 202.] 
Sir Terence O'Brien to Lord Knutsford (Received April 12th, 1892, 11 p.m.) T'elegrwk 

(Paraphrase.) 

At the request of my government I forward the following minute of council : 
My ministers consider it desirable that her majesty's government should 
immediately informed of the following facts : On the 6th instant the leader of 
opposition stated, upon the authority of Sir Charles Tupper, that Mr. Blaine assr 
at the conference held with Sir Charles Tupper and Sir J. Pauncefote on the 2nd A 
L891, that Mi-. Bond had expressed intention of this government to exclude Canad 
from bail privileges. As the leader of the opposition purports to quote from a desp 
from Sir 0. Tupper to Lord Stanley, my government immediately telegraphed to B< 
asking if statement was correct, and received the following reply : "I never state 
Sir Charles Tupper that you had expressed the intention of your Government to ex< 
Canadians from bait; you never said anything of the kind to me. Siii 
Pauncefote, who was present at the interview with Sir C. Tupper, says that no fJ 
thing w;is Baid or alluded to." This emphatic reply establishes the fact that no prcl 
given or implied that Canadians would be excluded from bait under convention 
that United States would be in any way differentially treated. 



! Enclosure 3 in No. 202.] 

17 Victoria Street, S.W., 28th April, 1892. 

SlH, I beg to acknowledge the receipt of Mr. Fail-field's letter of the 23rd ins 
transmitting a paraphrase of a telegram from the governor of Newfound 



i ii 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

ting a statement made in the Newfoundland Legislature as to what passed al 

interviews with Mr. Blaine in April of last year. It appears to me that there is 

,ie misapprehension in the matter. 

1 have never stated that Mr. Blaine asserted in my interviews with him that Mr. 

i.nl expressed the intention of the Newfoundland government bo exclude 

nadians from bait privileges. 

What I did say in my report to the late Sir John Maedonald upon the subject was 
follows : 

"Mr. Blaine said that it did not appear necessary to negotiate ahy^treaty with 
\\ t'oundland, as that colony had expressed its readiness to give the United States the 
ges they enjoyed by their own action, and that thfjy proposed not only to give 
it to United States fishermen, but to refuse to giv*e the same privilege to Canada. I 
.1 Mr. Blaine that the Bait Act in Newfoundland had received the assent of her 
\ upon the distinct pledge of Sir Ambrose Shea and the then premier of New- 
mdland that Canadian vessels would not be affected by it. That I understood the 
irts of Newfoundland had' declared that the. action taken under that act was not 
al. T added that her majesty had the power to disallow any bill that might be 
ssed upon the subject by the colony." 

I have no hesitation in saying that the above quotation describes accurately what 
3sed at my meeting with Mr. Blaine. 

Mr. Blaine asked whether Newfoundland had the power to continue to grant the 
vileges in question to the United States, and I replied in the manner T have already 
licated. 

In any case it should be borne in mind that before, the date of my meeting with 
i. 1 Maine, Newfoundland was issuing licenses to United States fishermen, and with- 
Iding them from Canadians. 

I am, (fee, 

CHARLES TUPPER. 



No. 203. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford. 

Government House, Ottawa, 19th May, 1892. 
ie Right Hon. the Lord Knutsford, G.C.M.C., (fee, cfec. 

My Lord, — With reference to your lordship's despatch no. 88, of the 9th ultimo, 
which you intimated that her majesty's government would not feel warranted in 
ferring to the judicial committee of the imperial privy council the case submitted 
this government with a view to the determination of the bait controversy between 
uiada and Newfoundland, I have the honour to forward herewith copy of an approved 
jinute of the privy council of Canada covering a report by the minister of marine 
jid fisheries, who urges that her majesty's government may be moved to reconsider 
eir decision. 

The minute represents that Canada has shown all willingness to adopt as a solution 

the difficulty the reference to the judicial committee suggested by your lordship, 

'nle Newfoundland has declined to accept it, and he considers that, as the consent of 

ewfoundland is unnecessary, and as, moreover, the case prepared by Canada is quite 

lobjectionable, her majesty's government might with propriety refer it independently 

either Canada or Newfoundland. 

I have, cfec, 

STANLEY OF PRESTON 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 2<jf.) A. 1! 

[Enclosure 1 in No. 203.] 

Certified Copy of a Report of a Committee ofjhe Honourable the Privy Com 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the lJfth Jfay, 11 

The committee of the privy council have had under consideration a despat 
hereto attached, dated 9th April, 1892, from Lord Knutsford, respecting the bait 
troversy. with Newfoundland. 

The committee have also had under consideration a report, hereto attached, di 
10th May, 1892, from the minister of marine and fisheries, to whom the despj 
above mentioned was referred, in which they concur. 

The* committee advise that your excellency be moved to forward a copy hereof 
the right honourable the principal secretary of state for the colonies for the infoi 
tion of her majesty's government. 

All of which is respectfully submitted for your excellency's approval. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



[Enclosure 2 in No. 203.] 

Ottawa, 10th May, 189: 
To His Excellency the Governor-General in Council. 

The undersigned has had referred to him a despatch from her majesty's princi 
secretary of state for the colonies, dated 9th April, 1892. 

This despatch acknowledges receipt of minutes of the Canadian privy council 
the bait controversy with Newfoundland, forwarded in your excellency's despatch 
the 10th March last, and states that Lord Knutsford, having carefully considered i. 
papers, believes that on reconsideration your excellency's ministers will agree 
her majesty's government that they would not be warranted in placing an ex 
statement of this controversy, prepared by one side only, before the judicial commi 
of the privy council. 

His lordship states that your excellency's ministers will doubtless co 
whether there is any other way by which the validity of the action of the gover 
of Newfoundland can be tested. 

It will be within the recollection of your excellency that, after other expe 
had apparently failed, your excellency's advisers suggested imperial legislation fo 
removal of the embargo placed, contrary to solemn pledges, upon Canadians unde 
provision's of the Newfoundland Bait Act. 

The suggestion of a reference to the judicial committee of the privy council 
from her majesty's government, and was promptly accepted by the governme 
( lanad'a. 

Tt does not appear that the consent of the government of Newfoundland is ne< 
sary to the submission of the case to the judicial committee. 

The case in strictness need not be described as ex parte. 

The undersigned would further observe that the questions of fact contained i: 
reference do not involve any collection of evidence. 

No attempt has Ix-en made in the draft case to depart from a statement 
undoubted facts. 

The question put for decision is: "Are the contentions of the government 
Canada, as above stated, or any of them, in accordance with law, and if not to wl 
extent are they in accordance with law V 

The government of Newfoundland could not, it is submitted, with a view 
procuring 8 correcl decison, put the case differently, nor could it possibly better its o 
position by any other form of submission. 

The undersigned begs to call your excellency's attention to the provisions 
the Act 3 and I William IV., chapter 41, intituled: "An Act for the better Adn 
istration of Justice in His Majesty's Privy Council." This statute provides for cert 

6 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

embers of his majesty's government to form a committee to be styled : " The Judicial 
anmittee of the Privy Council," before which appeals in certain cases lie. Section 4 
•ads as follows : — 

"(IV). And be it therefore enacted that it, shall be lawful for His .Majesty to 
fer to the said Judicial Committee for hearing or consideration any such other matters 
hatsoever as His Majesty shall think lit, and such committee shall thereupon hear OT 
insider the same and shall advise His Majesty thereon in manner aforesaid." 

The present case seems to be one which may very properly form a reference to this 
immittee under the provisions of the section just quoted. 

It will he within the recollection of your excellency that, at the time when the 
anadian government had asked that her majesty's government should he moved to 
lopt legislation to prevent the government <>f Newfoundland refusing bait licenses 
• Canadian tishing vessels, while freely granting them to the citizens of a foreign nation, 
ord Knutsford suggested to your excellency's government, in his despatch, covered 
v privy council reference, no. 784 H, that a joint case should be prepared, stating the 
icts on behalf of the government of the dominion of Canada and that of the colony 
E Newfoundland for reference to the judicial committee under the particular section 
referred to. 

In the despatch dated 26th May, 1891, the secretary of state for the colonies in- 
►rmed the governor of Newfoundland that he had communicated with the law officers 
r the crown, and enquired whether, in their opinion, the Colonial Act of 1889 gave 
ower to the colonial government to refuse licenses to Canadian and French fish- 
men, while granting such licenses to United States and colonial fishermen, and, if it 
id give such power, whether that power might be exercised otherwise than by procla- 
lation of the governor under section 4 of the act. He asked whether, if the act did 
ot give such power of discrimination, the colonial government could in its executive 
apacity arbitrarily exclude any class of her majesty's subjects from fishing in the 
British waters of Newfoundland, while allowing other British subjects and foreigners 

so. 

Lord Knutsford was advised that, in the opinion of the law officers, the colonial 
overnment has power to refuse to give licenses under the act of 1889 to French fisher- 
icii, who, as foreigners not entitled to fish in the British territorial waters of New- 
wmdland, do not belong to the class of persons to whom the act contemplates that 
icenses will be granted; but that the United States fishermen are not subject to exclu- 
ion on this ground, by reason of the special right belonging to the United States, and 
ecognized in the treaties, of 1783 and 1818, to enjoy in common with British subjects, 
be fisheries of these waters ; and that, in their opinion, the colonial government is not 
ntitled by the act to exclude Canadians or other British fishermen from obtaining 
ses. 

His lordship was further advised that the act of 1889 gave, by implication, power 
Jo the colonial government to make regulations as to the mode and terms of issuing 
es, but not to discriminate between persons who at the time of its passing were 
entitled to fish in its territorial waters. 

On the same date the secretary of state for the colonies, in notifying Sir William 

Whiteway of the decision of the law officers of the crown, expressed a strong hope 

hat, as the action of the Newfoundland government was ultra vires, the prohibition 

list issuing licenses to Canadian fishermen w r ould at once be withdrawn. 

The executive of Newfoundland, however, declined to accept the decision of the 

aw officers of the crown, and continued their policy of discrimination against Cana- 

lian fishermen. 

The government of Newfoundland has, therefore, refused to accept the decision 
af the law officers of the crown, and also declines to take part in the reference of a 
joint case to the judicial committee of her majesty's privy council. 

The reference to the judicial committee by her majesty's government, indepen- 
dently of Canada or of Newfoundland, appears to the undersigned to be now a most 
natural proceeding. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Xo. 20d to 20f.) A. 181 

It is significant in this connection that the government of Newfoundland now j» 
pose retroactive legislation for the purpose of legalizing their past action. 

The undersigned would also invite your excellency's attention to the fact til 
having been advised that the exaction of fees from Canadian fishing vessels under I 
Bait Act of 1889, during the year 1890 was illegal, he arranged with the honours! 
the minister of justice to take steps for the recovery of the sums paid by the mastl 
of Canadian vessels for licenses issued to them during that year. Should, however, I 
Newfoundland government obtain such ex post facto legislation, the result of these jl 
ceedings would, of course, fail. 

The undersigned, therefore, recommends that your excellency should convey I 
request of the Canadian government that the right honourable the secretary of stj 
for the colonies be moved to reconsider his despatch, and that the question be nl 
referred to the judicial committee of her majesty's privy council. 

The undersigned recommends that a copy of this report, if approved, be transmitij 
to the right honourable the principal secretary of state for the colonies, for the inij 
mation of her majesty's government. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. TUPPER, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 



[Enclosure 3 in No. 203.] 
Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 9th April, 1892. 
To His Excellency the Governor General, &c, &c, &c. 

My Lord, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatches 
66 and 67, of the 10th of March, forwarding minutes of the Dominion privy coi 
respecting the bait controversy with Newfoundland. 

I have carefully considered these papers, and I think that on reconsideration 
ministers will agree with her majesty's government that they would not be warn 
in placing an exparte statement of this controversy prepared by one side only before 
privy council. 

Your ministers will doubtless consider whether there is any other way by \ 
the legality of the action of the Newfoundland government can be tested. 

I have, &c, 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 204. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 17th May, 1892. 
To Hi- Excellency the Governor General, etc., &c, cvc. 

My Lord, I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch no. 
of the 11th of March enclosing copy of an order in council respecting the relatic 
between the Dominion and Newfoundland. 

5 on will have learned from my telegram of the 9th of March that the propoa 
conference here is no longer practicable as Mr. Harvey had returned to Newfoundlai 

\\ iih regard bo the question whether the draft convention between Newfoundla 
and the United States involves discrimination in favour of the latter and agaii 
Canada, I have already placed my \ lews before you in my despatch of the 26th of Mar< 

I have, &c, 

KNUTSFORD. 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

No. 205. 
Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Kuutsford. 

Government Eouse, Ottawa, 25th May, L892. 

The Right Honourable the Lord Knutsfohd, K.C.M.G., &c , &c, &c. 

My Lord, — On the 18th April, T received from the governoi of Newfoundland a 
belegram repeating under your lordship's instructions a telegram which he had sent to 
vour lordship on the 12th of that month relative to a statement alleged to have Ix-en 
made by Mr. Morine, the leader of the opposition in the Newfoundland legislative 
assembly, as to the intention of Newfoundland to exclude Canadians from bait privi- 
vvhich had been contradicted by Mr. Blaine. This telegram was referred to my 
ministers for consideration, and I now have the honour to transmit copy of an approved 
minute of the privy council maintaining the accuracy of the statement made by 
Mr. .Morine, and representing that Mr. Blaine's contradiction applied to an incorrect 
version of the statement. 

I have, etc., 

STANLEY OF PRESTON. 



[Enclosure 1 to No. 205.] 
f 

Certified Copy of a report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 

approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 18th May, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council have had under consideration a telegram, 
hereto attached, from his excellency Sir Terence O'Brien, governor of Newfoundland, 
stating that he had been desired by Lord Knutsford to repeat to your excellency a 
telegram sent to him on the 12th April, 1892. 

This telegram refers to a statement made by the leader of the opposition in the 
legislature of Newfoundland touching a reported assertion by Mr. Blaine as to the 
attitude of Newfoundland towards Canada under the Bond-Blaine convention. 

The undersigned has ascertained that the source from which Mr. Morine obtained 
the information which he used in support of his statement in the legislature was a letter 
written a year ago by Sir Charles Tupper to the late Sir John A. Macdonald, detailing 
the substance of a conversation exchanged with Hon. Mr. Blaine, in the presence of her 
majesty's minister, in which Mr. Blaine is represented as stating that they (Newfound- 
land) proposed not only " to give bait to United States' fishermen, but to refuse to give 
the same privilege to Canada." 

This letter was published in the Canadian Sessional Papers of 1891, together with 
ether correspondence on the subject, and has been before the public ever since, without 

curacy being questioned by any one. 

It will be further observed that in the phraseology of Mr. Bond's telegram, the 
words " had expressed the intention of this government to exclude Canadians from the 
bait privileges," are calculated to mislead. 

The minister observes that the question would have been properly put had the 
language used in Sir Charles Tupper's letter been adopted, viz. : — ". That they proposed 
not only to give bait to United States' fishermen, but to refuse to give the same privi- 
leges to Canada." 

It is submitted that the correct presentment of the ease suggests that the proposal 
was conditional upon certain contingencies involved in the ratification of the conven- 
tion. 

The former presentment, for which there is no justification afforded by the letter 
ol s ii Charles Tupper, asserts that an actual expression of the intention of the govern- 
ment of Newfoundland to exclude Canadians from the bait privileges had been authori 
tatively given, and that such intention Mas in no way contingent upon any future 
arrangements to be entered into between the United States and Newfoundland. 

9 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 18! 

Whatever treatment Newfoundland was to extend to the United States had 
connection with her already established relations with Canada, and, if it could be he! 
that the incident of the conversation should turn on a question of memory, Mr. Box 
is not assisted in establishing that it was not the intention of his government to 
criminate against Canada, for the conference was held on 1jie 2nd April, while 
Bond had already issued instructions to the officials of Newfoundland, dated 20t 
March, entirely excluding Canadians from participating in the bait privilege. 

The minister further observes that the conclusion of the despatch of the govern^ 
of Newfoundland reiterates the point which the Newfoundland authorities have laboui 
so bard to maintain — that no promise was implied or given that Canadians would 
excluded from bait, or that the United States would be treated differentially in ai 
way. 

Whatever force could be given to this argument under different circumstance 
cannot, it is submitted, apply under those existing, as the absence of any specific sta 
ment, that it was intended to discriminate against Canada, could not be held effective 
against an actual and persistent discrimination being exercised on every opportunity, 
favour of the United States' citizens against Canadians. 

The committee, on the recommendation of. the minister of marine and fisheri(| 
advise that your excellency be moved to forward a copy of this minute to the ri£ 
honourable the secretary of state for the colonies, for the information of her majesty 
government. 

All which is respectfully submitted for your excellency's approval. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk, Privy Council. 



No. 206. 

Office of the High Commissioner for Canada, 
Victoria Chambers, 17 Victoria Street, London, S.W., 18th May, 1892. 

The Hon. J. J. C. Abbott, Q.C. 

Dear Mr. Abbott, — I send, for your information, a cutting from the Times j 
Friday last, in which you will notice that the under secretary of state for foreign affail 
in reply to a question in the house of commons, stated that the government b 1 
decided not to approve the proposed convention between Newfoundland and the UnitU 
States, and that they were unable to depart from the position taken up that negotiation 
between the United States and Newfoundland must proceed pari passu with negotl 
bions for any arrangement between Canada and the United States. 

I had a long conversation a day or two ago with Lord Knutsford upon the subje; 
when In- int. Mined me that the government had arrived at the decision to which I hal 
referred. He informed me, however, that it would strengthen his hands a good dl 
with liis colleagues, if the Canadian government did not extend their retaliatory poll 
against Newfoundland. His lordship stated that the government recognized that II 
only \\;i\ out of the difficulties of Newfoundland was the admission of the colony hi 
the Dominion, and they were extremely anxious that nothing should be done likely! 
retard this very desirable consummation, At the same time he frankly recognized i| 
provocation the Dominion had received, and also the injury inflicted upon Canadil 
fishermen and traders by the hostile policy of our neighbours. In these circumstanl 
I though! it desirable t<. send the following telegram to you in cipher yesterday : — ! 

" Long conversation Knutsford last night. Government decided not to pen| 
Newfoundland arrangement with States unless Canada included." 

Yours faithfully, 

CHARLES TUPPER. 

10 



Newfoundland and ( Canada. 

[Enclosure 1 in No, 206. J 

IThe Times, L3th May, 1892. 
NEWFOUNDLAND. 

Mr. F. Evans asked the under-secretary for the colonics upon what day he would 
iv upon the table the correspondence which had passed between her majesty's govern- 
nent and the government of Newfoundland, respecting the proposed convention recently 
ligreed between the governments of the United Slates and of Newfoundland. 

Baron H. de Worms. — Papers will be presented as soon as the interests of the 
mblic, sci- vice permit. 

Mr. F. Evans. -Am 1 to understand that on a question so closely affecting the 
l^elfare of the people of' Newfoundland a little closer answer cannot be given by the 
government ? 

Baron H. de Worms. — It would be contrary to precedent to present papers until 
initiations are completed. 

NEWFOUNDLAND AND UNITED STATES CONVENTION. 

Mr. F. Evans asked the under-secretary of state for foreign affairs whether her 
majesty's government had declined to assent to the convention between the United 
States government and the government of Newfoundland. 

Mr. J. W. Lowther. — The answer to the honourable member's question is in the 
iffirmative. Her majesty's government have not been able to depart from the position 
which they have taken up that the negotiations of a convention between the United 
States and Newfoundland must proceed pari passu with the negotiation of an arrange- 
ment between Canada and the United States. 



No. 207. 

Halifax, N.S., 18th May, 1892. 
Hon. Charles H. Tupper, 

-Minister of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa. 

Will you please telegraph me how many trap licenses issued to Newfoundlanders 

A. G. JONES. 



No. 208. 

Ottawa, 20th May, 1892. 
Hon. A. G. Jones, Halifax, N.S. 

Enquiry being made to answer your telegram definitely about Labrador licenses. 

CHARLES H. TUPPER. 



No. 209. 

Ottawa, 20th May, 1892. 
,! Commander Wakeham, 

SS. " La Canadienne," Gaspe. 

Call at Esquimalt Point for instructions re cod traps. 

WILLIAM SMITH, 

Deputy-Minister of Marine and Fisheries 
11 



5G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 189cl 

No. 210. 

Ottawa, 21st May, 1892. 
Commander nVakeham, 

SS. " La Canadienne," Gaspe. 

Status quo 1889 to be reverted to between Canada and Newfoundland. A faifl 
division of traps will, therefore, be made to fishermen of both countries this season ii 
Labrador. 

CHARLES H. TUPPER 



No. 211. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

(Paraphrase.) 21st May, 1892. 

The following message has been received from the governor of Newfoundland : — • 
k " My ministers request me to transmit the following message : — 
" Upon consideration of proposal in the telegram from the secretary of state fo 
the colonies of the 16th ult. to revert to status quo of 1889 for the current year, an< 
for conference to effect an amicable adjustment of existing differences, and also of Lor<| 
Knutsford's despatch of 7th instant, it was resolved that, in order to meet the views o 
her majesty's government, and to restore friendly relations between the two colonie 
a communication conveying an expression of these views be sent to the governor gen 
eral of Canada." 

Your government should communicate as soon as possible with the Newfoundland 
government. I am confident that this will be received with great satisfaction ii 
Canada. 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 212. 

Sir T. O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

(Paraphrase.) 21st May, 1892. 

I am requested by my ministers to transmit the following message : — 
My government agree, in order to meet the views, of her majesty's government, a 
contained in despatch from colonial office, dated 7th instant, and telegram of 16th ult 
to revert, pending conference, to the status quo of 1889 for the current year. 

Additional duties on Canadian products will be removed on the receipt of intinu 
tion thai your government have removed duties on Newfoundland products. 

O'BRIEN. 



No. 213. 
Lord Stanley of Preston to S>r*T. O'Brien. 
(ParapJvra&e.) 22nd May, 1892. 

The Canadian government has received your message with satisfaction. 

A proclamation suspending duties on Newfoundland fish and fish products is bein 
prepared, bu1 under the statute it should recite that Newfoundland duties have l>< j *' 
reduced. Ii is hoped that your government will be able to announce, without delft} 
t he iviim.n al of t he addil ional duties. 

Arrangements will be made to effeel complete reciprocity in remission of duties i] 

t he meant ime. 

STANLEY. 
12 



Newfoundland and ( anada. 

No. 214. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford. 

Paraphrase.) 22nd May, L892. 

Your telegram of May 21st respecting Newfoundland. 

I had received yesterday morning telegram to same effect, and in reply, telegraphed 
it we received message with satisfaction, and that proclamation suspending duties on 
»wfoundland fish and fish products was being prepared. Meanwhile arrangements 
11 be made to effect complete reciprocity in remission of duties. We cannot under 
statute issue it until Newfoundland duties have been reduced, but it will be issued 
moment we receive announcement of removal of additional duties. 

STANLEY. 



No. 215- 

Ottawa, 23rd May, 1892. 
Wakrham, Gaspe. 

License book does not show any licenses issued Newfoundlanders. What licenses 
did you issue Newfoundlanders 1 

WM. SMITH, 
Deputy-Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 



No. 216. 

Sir Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 
(Para])hrase.) 23rd May, 1892. 

As duties came on automatically under Revenue Act on your putting duties on our 
fish, they will, when you take off your duty, come off in the same manner. 

O'BRIEN. 



No. 217. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien. 
(Paraphrase.) 24th May, 1892. 

Your telegram of the 23rd. 

If neither party can move till the other moves first it is obvious deadlock. Could 
nut a formal notice of intention to remove duties reciprocally say from 1st June be ac- 
cepted as sufficient on both your side and ours 1 

STANLEY. 



No. 218. 



Sir T. O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

tyelegram.) 24th May, 1892. 

Referring to my telegram of 23rd May should you anticipate any difficulty, we 
should both of us fix on date for removal simultaneously of imposition of duties on 
product of both countries. 

O'BRIEN. 
13 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 189 

No. 219. 

Paspebiac, 24th May, 1892. 
Wm. Smith, D.M. M. and F. 

Eight licenses from number 411 to 418 in license book : Captains Penny, Blandfor 
two Shetlers, Begruey, Brown, Buckle and Whitely. 

W. WAKEHAM. 



No. 220. 

Sir T. O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 
{Paraphrase.) 25th May, 1892. 

My ministers agree on mutual notice to remove duties on and after Friday, 27 
inst. 

Proclamation will be issued upon your reply concerning this. 

O'BRIEN. 



No. 221. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien. 
{Telegram) Ottawa, 26th May, 1892. 

Dominion government agree to remove duties on and after Friday 27th inst., on tl 
understanding that on that day Newfoundland government do likewise, and also remo^l 
restrictions as to bait fishes. Please telegraph as soon as instructions are issued, h\\ 
our proclamation will issue to-morrow afternoon on the assumption that the agreemer 
has been carried out by Newfoundland. 

STANLEY. 






No. 222. 

Sir Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

(Telegram.) 27th May, 1892. 

Notice inserted in Gazette to-day that extra duties levied under section 13 Revem; 
Act 1891, will not be collected on and after this date. Dominion government havin 
removed duties on fish and fish products exported from Newfoundland into Dominion c 
Canada, notice has been given by telegraph to officials to grant bait licenses to Dominio 
fishermen upon same terms as to Newfoundland fishermen giving similar bonds. 

O'BRIEN. 



No. 223. 
Lord Stanley oj Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien. 

(Telegram.) Ottawa, 27th May, 1892. 

Thanks for telegram. Our proclamation passed through privy council and wi 
appear in Canada Gazette to-morrow, so that I hope all difficulty departs for the presem 

STANLEY. 
H 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

No. 224. 
Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford. 

I'Teh'f/ram.) Ottawa, 27th Muy. L892. 

I sent following message fco governor of Newfoundland, 26th May: 
" Dominion governmenl agree to remove duties on and after 27tfn Maw on I be under- 
standing that on 27th May, Newfoundland government do likewise, and also remove 
jjBtrictions as to bait fishes. Please telegraph as soon as instructions are issued, but 
mr proclamation will issue 27th May, on the assumption that the agreement has been 
harried out by Newfoundland." This is satisfactory so far. 

STANLEY. 



i'lDj 



No. 225. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Lord Knutsford. 
Wdegram.) Ottawa, 28th May, 1892. 

My telegram of 25th April, private. I learn that a bill of same purport is being 
Aessed through legislature just now. I hope that it will not be allowed to pass with- 
out reservation. It appears to me to be objectionable, both as being unfair and as 
being retroactive. 

STANLEY. 



No. 226. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 
(Tehtjram.) 30th May, 1892. 

H. M. G. learn with satisfaction intelligence in your telegram of 27th May as to 
Newfoundland. 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 227. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien. 

(Teleyram.) Ottawa, 30th May, 1892. 

Sincerely glad that matters are on a better footing. We fully appreciate con- 
ciliatory attitude and reciprocate kind feeling. Could you now ascertain informally 
what their views are about a conference. It appears to me that it would be best held 
in London. One of our principal 'ministers will probably be there before long upon 
other business and you might prefer him to high commissioner. What would suit 
| best as to time, 1 On hearing from you I propose to telegraph secretary of state for 
■ the colonies. This telegram unofficial, but Dominion ministers would agree. Please 
| show it to prime minister if you think fit. 

STANLEY. 



15 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 189? 

No. 228. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 
(Telegram.) 31st May, 1892. 

Referring to your telegram of 28th May. following telegram sent to governor \ 
Newfoundland, May 26th: — " Law officers of the crown advise as regards custoirl 
duties levied under section 13 of Revenue Act, 1891. Queen may be properly advise 
to allow retrospective provisions contained in your telegram of 27th April ; as regarcj 
license fees under Bait Act, they advise under any pretence statutory or other authoritj 
for charging such fees ought to be sanctioned by retrospective legislation ; if Revenul 
Bill amended accordingly you may assent to it." Section 13 of Newfoundland 
Act was adopted in 1885 in view of section 4 of Canada Customs Act of that year, 
hope that negotiations about to be begun will result in modifications in sections <| 
Canadian and Newfoundland Acts referred to. Despatch follows by mail. 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 229. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 31st May, 1892. 
Governor General, &c. 

My Lord, — I have the honour to acquaint you that her majesty's governmerl 
have had under consideration your despatches and telegrams respecting the Revenij 
Bill which has been passed by the legislature of Newfoundland. 

Her majesty's government have given their careful attention to the representation 
of your ministers on the subject of section 13 of this bill, which provides for the levj 
ing in certain circumstances of discriminating duties on Canadian goods, but they haty 
ascertained that the same clause has been included in every Newfoundland Revenij 
Act since 1885, when it was inserted in view of the duty imposed by the Dominic; 
Customs Act of that year on fish from Newfoundland and other countries. 

Her majesty's government have therefore been unable to take so serious a step \ 
to instruct the governor to reserve the bill on account of this provision, as urged h 
your ministers. 

I venture to hope tliat during the negotiations with Newfoundland upon whicj 
your government are about to enter it may be found possible to arrange for the mutuJ 
withdrawal of the sections in the Canadian and Newfoundland Revenue Acts whicfl 
have given rise to the present difficulty. 

With regard to the retrospective provisions of the measure, as to the duties leviej 
under the similar clause in the act of 1891 and the sums paid for license fees under tlS 
Bait Act in 1890, with a view to the full consideration of these provisions, I instructed 
the governor that unless they were accompanied by a suspending clause he must resenfl 
the measure. 

The question was then referred to the law officers of the crown, and they ha%|| 
reported thai her majesty may be properly advised to assent to the legislation fcj 
retrospective legislation of the duties levied under section 13 of the Revenue Act ([■ 
L891, but that with respect to the sums charged for license fees under the Bait Act il 
L890. .i there was no statutory or other authority for charging such fees they ouglj 
nut to be sanctioned by retroactive legislation. 

I have, therefore, in accordance with this opinion informed the governor of New! 
foundland that if the bill is amended by the omission of the retrospective provisions em 
t<> tin' bait license fees he may assent to it. 

I have, tfcc, 

KNUTSFORD. 
16 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

No. 230. 

Ibrtified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the Gth June, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council have had under consideration a confidential 
[espatch, hereto attached, dated 26th March, L892, from the right honourable the 
ecretary of state for the colonies, acknowledging the receipt of a telegram from your 
soellency dated 15th March, 1892, stating the views of the Canadian government as 
the manner in which the draft Newfoundland convention discriminates against 
aiiadii in favour of the United States. 

The committee have had also under consideration the annexed report from the 
linister of marine and fisheries, to whom the despatch was referred in which they 
joncur. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



[Enclosure 1 in No. 230.] 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

Ottawa, 19th April, 1892. 
o His Excellency the Governor-General in Council. 

The undersigned has had under consideration the privy council reference no, 1122 h, 
- th Ap., 1892. 

It covers a confidential despatch from her majesty's principal secretary of state 

it the colonies, dated 26th March, which acknowledges the receipt of a telegram from 

<»ur excellency dated 15th ultimo, stating in what manner the draft convention 

en Newfoundland and the United States discriminates against Canada in favour 

he United States. 

After quoting sections IV and V of this draft, referring to their meaning and 

ating that it was natural in an arrangement applying solely to the United States that 

i k uls imported only from that country should be mentioned, his lordship proceeds to 

I hat there is nothing in article IV to imply that Newfoundland will not extend to 

countries the same scale of duties. Lord Knutsford is of opinion also that even if 

invention had come into force, an act of the legislature of Newfoundland would 

e necessary to affect the rates of duty on imports. 

He further points out that section 22 of the Newfoundland Tariff Act makes the 
duction of duty on flour and pork, on the coming into force of the convention, of general 
•plication. 

Your excellency's ministers are assured by his lordship that her majesty will not 
■ advised to give assent to any legislation by Newfoundland discriminating directlv 
st the products of the Dominion. 

His lordship then, touching the draft convention, the treaty of 1818, and the act 

1819 — while admitting that privileges in excess of those allowed under that treaty 

Mild be secured to United States' citizens — suggests that similar privileges were ac- 

>rded United States' vessels by the Canadian government under licenses for a fee of 

per ton, and that so far as Canada was concerned, the draft convention would 

e the treaty of 1818 absolutely unimpaired. 

The undersigned, on the important feature of discrimination, would refer to a joint 
port of the honourable the minister of justice and himself, embodied in an approved 
mute of council of 12th December, 1890, and the minute of council of 29th Jan- 
iry, 1891. 

These reports discussed the discrimination involved in the draft convention while 
ider discussion. 

) I 17 

20d, e, /— 2 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) 



A. 1893 



The opinion of your excellency's government was further expressed by an approved 
minute of council (no. 972 H.) embodying a report of the undersigned, dated 3rc] 
March, 1892, upon a despatch from the governor of Newfoundland, dated 26th Decern 
ber, 1891, communicating a minute of the executive council, declining to take part ir 
the submission of a case to the judicial committee of her majesty's privy council 

The. undersigned now has the honour to submit that not only was discriminatior 
contemplated by Newfoundland in favour of the United States of America against th< 
Dominion of Canada, as indicated by sections 4 and 5 of the draft convention, but tha 
to discriminate against Canada was, and is the intention of the government of Ne 
foundland, is the more clearly established by the fact that, at the time of the conven 
tion, the general duty on flour and pork was higher than the duty named in the drafi 
convention. 

It is of importance to note, in this connection, that, subsequently, the revenue hi 
transmitted by the governor of Newfoundland for royal assent expressly provided foi 
such discrimination. One of the delegates from Newfoundland on the French Sho: 
Question, and a member of the legislature of Newfoundland, informed the undersign 
that this bill was returned to Newfoundland for amendment, and it was amended b 
the executive and not by the legislature, so that the general duties and those under t 
convention were made to appear the same. 

From the above there would appear to be abundant evidence that so soon as th 
treaty is ratified the legislature of Newfoundland will be asked to raise the 
duties, otherwise the effort of the United States to limit the duties on goods from th; 
country is not easily understood. 

The undersigned desires to invite your excellency's attention to the present di 
crimination under a substantially prohibitive tariff against Canada as indicative of tl 
intention of the Newfoundland government in this direction. 

To show that the interpretation of the proposed arrangement is correct, the unde 
signed refers to an article published in the New York Tribune of 13th November, 189 
a recognized organ of the administration of that country, as well as by the attempts 
the part of the United States to introduce the principle of discrimination in the r 
treaty with the West Indies. 

The undersigned submits also, and it should not be forgotten, that independen 
of any treaty and apparently upon an informal and secret understanding, fishing ve 
of the United States of America now, and since the negotiations, have been enjoying 
the waters of Newfoundland privileges contrary to the provisions of the treaty of 181 
which are denied the fishing vessels of the Dominion of Canada, and to those of 
other country except the vessels of the United States. 

This particular feature of the case formed the subject of a special report to yo 
excellency dated 4th March, 1892, embodied in an approved minute of council, (i 
$68) to which attention is again directed. 

While his lordship's assurance that "Her Majesty will not be advised 
assent to any Newfoundland legislation discriminating directly against the products 
the Dominion" is very gratifying, it is nevertheless the fact that the governor 
Newfoundland annually approves of orders in council directly discriminatory a 
prohibitory to Canada, which are contrary to law, according to the law officers of 
crown, and fiscal duties substantially prohibitory are at present being enforced 
Newfoundland against goods from Canada. 

The undersigned cannot refrain from reminding your excellency, in dealing vi 
the drafi treaty and the intention and purpose of the Newfoundland government, of 
pa i assurances and broken pledges of that executive, and of the unfriendly treat: 
experienced bj Canada at the hands of Newfoundland, your excellency's governing 
naturally apprehensive of any legislation which gives that colony the power to fu 
discriminate against Canada. So that, if article IV of the convention may be cons 
as not implying thai Newfoundland would refuse to others the scale of duties spe 
for articles from the United States, it certainly affords no guarantee upon which 
maje ty's government could rely that British interests would not be sacrificed to th] 
< if a t'< ireign power. 



18 



'! 



Newfoundland and Canada. 



The undersigned takes this opportunity to call your excellency's attention to an 
mportant feature of the draft convention, to which the Canadian government, it is 
true, has already objected, hut which is not dealt with by Lord ECnutsford. 

Under the provisions of the convention, it is proposed, in substance, by the United 
States' government, to favour the goods of Newfoundland in preference to those of 
( lanada. 

This feature of discrimination is clear. 

To this the Canadian government strongly objects. It involves a policy fraught 
with the gravest consequences in the consideration of imperial interests in British North 
America, [t is practically an attempt to divide those interests which have hitherto 
been united. 

It is in effect a proposal to buy most favoured treatment through a surrender on 
the part of Newfoundland of the most important rights acquired for British America as 
a whole by the convention of 1818. 

The undersigned submits that the interest involved under this convention of 1818 
concern neither Canada nor Newfoundland alone ; but, affecting both, as they do, they 
concern Canada to a much greater degree than Newfoundland. 

In the opinion of the undersigned a sanction of the draft convention amounts, in 
effect, to the destruction of important fishery clauses of the treaty of 1818. 

The secretary of state of the United States may very properly seek the attainment 
of this end, but it is yet believed by your excellency's government that no govern- 
ment in Great Britain will aid him in the endeavour. 

His lordship refers to the action of Canada in granting licenses to United States' 
fishing vessels under the terms of what was known as the modus vivendi of 1888. 

Your excellency will observe that Canada is pursuing, in this regard, a policy 
highly endorsed by her majesty's government and in accordance with the understanding 
of her majesty's commissioners and a representative of the government of Newfound- 
land at Washington in 1888, and subsequently sanctioned by the legislatures of New- 
foundland and Canada, and always by acts of parliament. In this arrangement New- 
foundland co-operated with Canada, until it appeared possible to that colony that 
advantage could be gained for Newfoundland at the cost of Canadian interests. 

It is not to be forgotten, moreover, that the licenses granted to United States' 
fishing vessels in Canadian waters preserve intact every provision of the treaty of 1818, 
since the limited privileges granted from year to year are sold at a rate of $1.50 on each 
registered ton of the vessel whose owner takes out a license. 

No discrimination in the United States or in Canada is obtained in exchange for 
this arrangement, and no interest of Newfoundland or of the British empire is impaired. 

On the other hand it is now proposed by the draft convention, and contemporane- 
ous action on the part of Newfoundland, to exclude Canadian vessels from the enjoy- 
ment of privileges which are to be given free for a term of years to vessels of the United 
States, and contrary to the provisions of the treaty of 1818. 

The cases are not, therefore, it is submitted, analogous. 

In conclusion, the undersigned remarks that the reference to imperial legislation in 
this connection was made in order to strengthen the position taken by Canada when 
claiming that the draft convention involved Canadian interests as well as those of 
Newfoundland, and it is submitted that the imperial parliament could and should pro- 
tect these interests, which so much affect the prosperity and solidarity of the British 
empire. 

The undersigned thoroughly agrees with Lord Knutsford in the manifest desir- 
ability of removing any misapprehensions as to matters of fact and intention, so as to 
leave the way open to a friendly settlement of the question at issue. 

The undersigned recommends that a copy of this report, if approved, be forwarded 
to the right honourable the principal secretary of state for the colonies, for the informa- 
tion of her majesty's government. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. TUPPER, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
19 
20d,«,/-2£ 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 1893. 

[Enclosure 2 in No. 230.] 
(Despatch 26th March, 1892.) 

(See No. 190, papers relating to Canada and Newfoundland. Session of 1892, page! 
183, 23c, d, e, f, and h.) 



No 231. 

Certified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the > Honourable the Privy Council\ 
approved by His Excellency the Governor General in Council on the 6th June, 1892.' 

The committee of the privy council have had under consideration a despatch dated 
30th April, 1892, from the honourable the high commissioner for Canada, transmitting 
a copy of a letter with enclosures, received by him from the colonial office, respecting ai 
statement made in the Newfoundland legislature as to what passed at an interview 
between the high commissioner and Mr. Blaine at Washington in 1891, also his reply! 
thereto. 

The minister of marine and fisheries, to whom the despatch was referred, observes! 
that the high commissioner quotes the language used by him in the communication to 
the late prime minister of Canada in connection with his interviews at the conference 
at Washington during the year 1891. 

The minister, in this connection, desires to call attention to the minute of council, 
dated 18th May, 1892, upon the same subject, which deals more fully with the state 
ment as made in the Newfoundland legislature. 

The committee, on the recommendation of the minister of marine and fisheries, 
advise that your excellency be moved to forward a copy hereof, together with copies oil 
the despatch of the high commissioner, with its enclosure, to the governor of New-j 
foundland, for his information. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 
[Enclosure 1 in No. 231.] 
(See no. 202 preceding.) 

[Enclosure 2 hi No. 231.] 
(See Enclosure no. 1 in no. 202 preceding.) 

[Enclosure 3 in No. 231.] 
(See Enclosure no. 2 in no. 202 preceding.) 

[Enclosure 4 in No. 231.] 
(See Enclosure no. 3 in no. 202 preceding.) 



No. 232. 

Lord Stanley of Preston to Sir Terence O'Brien. 

Office of the Governor-General's Secretary, 

Ottawa, 11th June, 1892. 

Ili^ Excellency Sir Teebncb O'Brien, K.C.M.G. 

Sir, With reference fco your telegram of the 18th April last, dealing with a state 
men! alleged bo have been made by the leader of the opposition in the Newfoundland 
legislative assembly on the authority of Sir Charles Tupper, as to the intention olj 
Newfoundland bo exclude Canadians from bait privileges, I have the honour to forward 
herewith a copy of an approved minute of the privy council, 6th June, 1892, submit! 
ting copy of a despatch, with its enclosures, received from the high commissioner or 
tin subject, 

20 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

It will be observed that the high commissioner denies having made iise of the 
batement attributed to him in your telegram, and quotes the exad language of his 
eport to the late Sir John Macdonald, which would appear to have been misappre- 
lended. 

I have, &c., 

STANLEY OF PRESTON. 



No.' 233. 
Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

June 17th, 1892. 

We have reason to believe Newfoundland government prefer Canada to this coun- 
ty as meeting place for conference in relations with Canada. Your ministers should 
ommunicate with Newfoundland government as to best practical arrangements for 
neeting. 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 234. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 21st June, 1892. 
The Governor-General, 

&c, &c, &c. 

My Lord, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch no. 
157 of the 19th May, forwarding copy of an approved minute of the privy council 
igain urging that the case prepared by the Dominion government as to the legality of 
.the action of the Newfoundland government in refusing to issue bait licenses to Cana- 
dian fishermen should be submitted to the judicial committee of the privy council. 

Since the date of your lordship's despatch, a considerable change has taken place 
thAhe attitude of Newfoundland on this question, and her majesty's government hope 
that the friendly discussion of the matter between the two governments which is to 
take place will result in a permanent and satisfactory arrangement on this point. In 
these circumstances her majesty's government do not think it advisable at present to 
take the further steps indicated by your ministers. 

I have, -&c, 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 235. 

Lord Knutsford to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 6th July, 1892. 
Governor General, 

The Right Honourable Lord Stanley of Preston, G.C.B. 

My Lord, — With reference to my telegram of the 31st May, I have the honour to 
acquaint you, that although I have felt unable to authorize the governor of Newfound- 
land to issue a proclamation bringing into force the section of the Newfoundland 
Revenue Act, which sanctions the collection of the bait license fees imposed during 1890, 
1 am strongly of opinion that as the government of that colony have now adopted a 
more friendly attitude towards Canada, it would be a graceful act on the part of your 
ministers and in accordance with the spirit of the modus vivendi agreed upon between 
the two governments, rf they were to withdraw the actions which it is understood they 
have brought for the recovery of the sums paid for these license fees. 

21 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 1893; 

There is still, unfortunately, considerable feeling against Canada existing in New] 
foundland, and this cannot fail to be intensified should these actions .be pressed, and 
thus the good hopes which her majesty's government have entertained of establishing 
the relation of the two colonies on a permanent and satisfactory footing might bq 
seriously imperilled. 

The sums paid do not amount to much in the aggregate, and the persons who hav(j 
paid them have no doubt long since written them off, so that little hardship would b(| 
entailed on individuals by the withdrawal of the actions, and I am confident that th* 1 
forbearance of your government to press their claims in this matter would be highM 
appreciated in Newfoundland, while it would certainly be viewed with satisfaction m 
her majesty's government. 

I have, &e., 

KNUTSFORD. 



No. 236. 

Sir F. B. T. Carter to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

The Governor-General, &c, &c, &c. 

Government House, St. John's, 12th July, 1892. 

My Lord, — With reference to your lordship's despatch of the 11th June lasl 
respecting a statement alleged to have been made by Sir Charles Tupper in relation tj 
the exclusion of Canadians from British privileges within this colony, I have the honou 
to state that I have submitted your lordship's despatch, with enclosures, to the executiv 
council. 

I have, &c, 

F. B. T. CARTER, Administrator. 



No. 237. 

The Marquis of Rvpon to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

His Excellency 

The Lord Stanley of Preston. 

Downing Street, 26th August 1892. 

My Lord, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of 
30th of June, forwarding a copy of an approved minute of the privy council deal 
with the question of discrimination between Newfoundland and the United States. 

Tn reply I have to acquaint you, for the information of your ministers, that I 
ii«>t he supposed to assent to the contentions raised in this minute, as they have aires 
been dealt with in previous communications. I do not think it necessary to disc 
tlicin t'urt ber. 

I would observe, however, that there would appear to have been some misunc 
standing between the minister of marine and fisheries and one of the delegates fi 
Newfoundland respecting the mode of enacting the Newfoundland Revenue Bill 
L891. 

That measure was received in this department from the colony exactly in the fc 
in which it now stands amongst the statutes of the colony ; it was not returned to N< 
foundland for amendment, and it will be seen from the Journals of the Newfoundk 
Legislature of the 4th of May, 1891, that the amendment in question was made in 
usual manner by the legislature. 

T have, &,c. 

RIPON. 
9? 



Newfoundland and Canada, 

No. 238. 

brtified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council mi the I '2th 
September, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council have had under consideration a despatch, 
ated 6th July, 1892, from the right honourable the principal secretary of state for 
lir colonies, advising of the inability of her majesty's government to authorize the 
overnment of Newfoundland to issue a proclamation bringing into force the sect ion <»f 
he Newfoundland Revenue Act which sanctions the collection of the bait license fees 
Imposed during 1890. 

The minister of marine and fisheries, to whom the despatch was referred, observes 
hat his lordship the secretary of state for the colonies expresses hiinself as strongly 
>f the opinion that, under the changed condition of affairs between the colony of New- 
foundland and the dominion of Canada, it would be a graceful act on the part of the 
Canadian government, and in accordance with the spirit of the modus vvvendi agreed 
ipon, if they were to withdraw- the actions brought for the recovery of the sums paid 
for such license fees. 

The minister further observes that it is said that the sums paid do not, in the 
iggregate, amount to much, and the persons who have paid them have no doubt long 
since written them off, and that little hardship would be entailed by the withdrawal of 
he actions, while it would be appreciated by Newfoundland, and be viewed with satis- 
faction by her majesty's government. 

The minister suggests that, in his view, according to the understanding under 
which proceedings were instituted, the Canadian government would seem to be under 
a moral obligation to the litigants to carry on these suits, if possible, to a successful 
termination, nor could the claimants be asked to forego their demands unless Canada 
were prepared to assume the liability of Newfoundland. However small the amounts, 
the claimants are for the most part ill able to afford their loss, and the minister does 
not conceive that the hope of establishing good relations with Newfoundland, would be 
seriously impaired by insistence on what Canada is advised is a just and legal claim, 
inasmuch as it is not to be presumed that the government of Newfoundland would 
desire to retain any amount which might be found by the proper tribunal to have been 
exacted without the authority of the law. 

The minister, with every desire to promote good feeling between Canada and New- 
foundland, and to co-operate with her majesty's government in the maintenance of the 
most cordial and fraternal relations, is unable to recommend that the suits in question 
be abandoned. 

The committee, concurring in the above, advise that your excellency be moved to 
forward a copy of this report, if approved, to the right honourable the principal 
secretary of state for the colonies, for the information of her majesty's government. 
All of- which is respectfully submitted for vour excellency's approval. 

* JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



No. 239. 

Administrator of Xeivfoundland to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 15th Sept., 1892. 

Am requested by my responsible advisers to enquire of Y. L. earliest possible date 
at which it will be convenient for a deputation of Canadian government to meet delega- 
tion from this colony at Halifax to discuss fishery question and other questions of differ- 
ence between the two governments. 

k ADMINISTRATOR. 

23 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 18! 

No. 240. 

Certified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Councl 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 23m 
September, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council have had before them a telegram from tn 
administrator of the government of Newfoundland to your excellency, dated the 15t| 
September, 1892, hereto attached. 

The committee advise that your excellency be moved to inform the administrate) 
by telegraph, that a deputation from the Canadian government can meet a delegatio 
from the government of Newfoundland at Halifax to discuss the fishery question an 
other questions between Newfoundland and the Dominion, any time after the tenth da] 
of October next. 

The committee further advise that the government of Newfoundland be invited ti 
name a day subsequent to the tenth of October, on which it would be convenient f< 
their delegates to meet a Canadian delegation. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 
Clerk, Privy Council. 



No. 241. 

Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council approved by His Excellent 
the Governor-General in Council on the 23rd September, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council beg to recommend to your excellency that th 
minister of militia and defence, the minister of customs, and the minister of marine an* 
fisheries, be appointed a deputation to meet and confer with certain delegates from th 
government of Newfoundland upon the fishery question and other questions betweei 
the two governments. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk, Privy Council. 



No 242. 

Sir Terence O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 25th October, 1892 

My Lord, — Referring to my telegram of October 22nd, delegation from Newfoundj 
land purpose leaving on November 2nd by Allan mail steamer. 

O'BRIEN. 






No. 243. 

CERTIFIED Cop? of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Counci^ 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 29th Octobei 

is'.,:. 

The committee <>f the privy council have had before them a despatch, heret< 
attached, dated 20th June, 1892," from the administrator of the government of New 
foundland, advising thai his government still decline to consider the claim of Mr 
Henry Dicks forthe rest ..ration of his schooner "Hattie," which was seized by the New 
foundland officials, and for a refund of customs duties claimed to have been iJlegalh 
collected from him, and also a report thereon, hereto attached, dated 19th August, 1892 
from the minister of marine and fisheries, to whom the above mentioned despatch wa* 
referred, in which W is recommended that the despatch in question be referred to tht 
minister of justice for his consideration of the steps which may be taken' in this case. 

24 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

The minister of justice recommends that the claim in question and all papers in 

mnection therewith — minute of council of 31st December, 1890, no. 2840 ; minute 

council of 26th January, 1891, no. 145, 1891 ; and minute of council of 26th 

[arch, 1892, no. 560H — be referred to those members of your excellency's council, 

no are about to confer with commissioners from the government of Newfoundland in 

i to divers matters in difference between that colony and Canada, with a view to 

; cir obtaining proper settlement, and in the event of no such settlement being 

I, that the papers be again referred to the minister of marine and fisheries in 

•der thai the whole matter may be brought to the attention of her majesty's govern- 

ent 

The committee submit the above recommendation for your excellency's approval. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



[Enclosure 1 in No. 243.] 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, Canada, 

Ottawa, 19th August, 1892. 
i His Excellency 

The Governor General in Council. 

On reference, no. 1289H, from the privy council, dated 14th ultimo, covering copy 
a despatch of the 20th June last, from the administrator of the government of New- 
ondland stating that his ministers still decline to consider the claim of Mr. Henry 
icks, for the restoration of his schooner "Hattie," which was seized by the Newfound- 
(iii officials, and for the refund of customs duties claimed to have been illegally collected 
>in him, the undersigned has the honour to recommend that the despatch be now 
ferred to the honourable the minister of justice for his consideration of the steps which 
iy he taken in this case. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. TUPPER, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 



[Enclosure 2 in No. 243.] 

Administrator to Governor-General. 

Government House, St. John's, 20th June, 1892. 
ie Right Honourable 

The Lord Stanley of Preston, 
&c., <fec., &c. 

My Lord, — In answer to your lordship's despatch of the 30th March last, forward- 
: an approved minute of the privy council with reference to the case of Mr. Henry 
1 have the honour to inform your lordship that my ministers still decline to 
isider the claim. 

I have, &c, 

F. B. T. CARTER, 

Administrator. 



[Enclosure 3 in No. 243.] 

RTIFIED Copy oj a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 26th March, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council have had under consideration a despatch (hereto 
ached), dated 10th April, 1891, from the governor of Newfoundland communicating 

25 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20r.) A. ^188 

a letter from his colonial secretary, dated 9th April, 1891, in answer to a minuteB 
council of the 31st December, 1890, recommending that the attention of the NewfouB 
land government be called to a claim on behalf of Mr. Henry Dicks, owner of I 
schooner "Hattie," of Charlottetown. 

The minister of marine and fisheries, to whom the despatch was referred, obserH 
that in the despatch it is stated that the government of Newfoundland considered t{§ 
there were no grounds for the claim set up by Mr. Dicks, as if he did suffer loss it mi 
upon a breach of the local laws. 

The minister further observes that the minute of council above referred to fully M 
out that the claim in question, amounting to $2,000, was preferred by reason of I 
treatment received at the hands of the Newfoundland authorities in connection with I 
Bait Act, and it was also pointed out that throughout the whole transaction thjt 
appeared to be every disposition on the part of Mr. Dicks to comply with the requH 
ments of the local laws. 

The minister, in view of the answer returned by the Newfoundland govermJj 
in this connection, recommends that your excellency be moved to inquire of the dfl 
ernor of Newfoundland whether his government is ready to afford an opportunitylfc 
Capt. Dicks to substantiate his claim by proof. 

The committee advise that your excellency be moved to forward a copy of I 
minute to his excellency the governor of Newfoundland. 

All of which is respectfully submitted for your excellency's approval. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk, Privy Council. 



No. 244. 

Certified Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Cot 
<ij>l>roved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council on the 
October, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council beg to recommend to your excellency thai 
minister of justice be appointed a member of the deputation to meet and confer 
certain delegates from the government of Newfoundland upon the fishery question 
other questions between the two governments, in the room of the minister of me 
and fisheries, who is obliged to proceed to England on official business. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk, Privy Council. 



No. 245. 

Sir T. O'Brien to Lord Stanley of Preston. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 5th Nov., 1892. 

Mail steamer arrived this morning. Delegates will start to-night. 

O'BRIEN. 



No. 246. 

Report of a Committee of the Honourable tlie Privy Council, approved by His £ 
lency the Governor-General in Council on the 9th December, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council, on the recommendation of Sir John Thorn} 
K.( J.M.G., submil the accompanying copy of the proceedings of the conference rece 
held al Halifax bel ween delegates from the governments of Canada and Newfoundl 
for your excellency's information. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 
26 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

If is Excellency the Governor-General in Council : 

Pursuant to arrangement, delegates representing the governments of Canada and 
fffoundland respectively, met in the legislative council chamber at Halifax on the 
ember, 1892, at 11 o'clock. 

Tlurc were present, the honourable Mackenzie Bowell, honourable J. A. Chapleau 
I honourable Sir John Thompson, K.C.M.G., representing the government of Canada, 
honourable Sir William Whiteway, K.C.M.G., honourable A. W. Harvey and 
tonrable Robert Bond, representing the government of Newfoundland. 

The delegates thereupon filed their credentials (see appendices 1, 2, 3 and 4). 

The conference was organized by the selection of Sir William Whiteway as chair- 
n. and Mr. Douglas Stewart, of the department of justice, Ottawa, as secretary. 

1 1 was agreed that the following subjects should be considered by the conference : — 

(1.) The convention between Newfoundland and the United States, known as the 
nd-Blaine convention. 

(2.) The bait question. 

> The imposition of a tariff on Newfoundland fish by the Canadian government, 
I the tariff of Newfoundland on Canadian products. 

> The boundary between Canadian Labrador and Newfoundland, and collection 
luties at Labrador. 

(5.) The status of Newfoundland fishermen on the coast of Canadian Labrador, and 
status of Canadian fishermen on the coast of Newfoundland. 

) The fees collected from United States vessels under the modus vivendi, for 
in 1888, and succeeding years. 
It was understood that the conclusions which might be arrived at by the conference 
»uld be ad referendum to the respective governments. 

It was agreed that the sessions of the conference should begin at 10 o'clock a.m. 
t S o'clock p.m. each day until the conference should conclude. 

LABRADOR. 

The question of the Labrador boundary was first considered. 

Mr. Bowell explained that the present grievance was one more particularly relating 
customs exactions than one in connection with location of the boundary. While 
nister of customs, his attention had been called to the report of Lieut. Gordon, R.N., 
which it was stated that traders who supplied the coast of Labrador, and who usually 
ide Rigoulette their first port of call, were required by the Newfoundland customs 
icials to make entry there, and pay duty on the full cargo, although a portion of the 
rgo was intended for consumption on Canadian territory. This system was said to 
ply more particularly to supplies for the Labrador coast in the vicinity *of Ungava 

Sir William Whiteway said that it seemed to him that the Newfoundland customs 
icials would only exact duty upon such goods as might be reported for entry at the 
it in Newfoundland territory to which they might be consigned — that this was more 
a matter between the traders or importers and the customs officials, than one for the 
isideration of the respective governments. He pointed out that the Canadian gov- 
nnent had full power to exact customs duties on all goods entering their territory at 
a Bay or elsewhere, even though they had previously paid duty at Rigoulette, 
d that the customs officer at Rigoulette had no instructions to exact duties on goods 
her than those entered for consumption in Newfoundland territory. 

Mr. Harvey stated that he had never heard of the grievance before, and that he 
a quite sure that the customs officer on the coast of Labrador had no authority to act 
the manner which had been alleged. 

Mr. Bond repudiated any desire on the part of the Newfoundland government to 
rmit such a practice. 

Mr. Bowell replied that while it was satisfactory to learn that no instructions had 
en given by the Newfoundland government to its officers to collect customs duties 

27 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A 18!;; 

upon goods, the ultimate destiny of which was for consumption in Canada, it was hi 
portant to know whether such duties had been collected and passed to the credit of M 
Newfoundland revenue. It would be seen by reference to the reports of Lieut. GordJIi 
of 1884 and 1886, that this had been done, whether through error on the part of NeB: 
foundland customs officials or not, was not known. In confirmation of what he had sali 
he might mention the fact that Mr. Parmelee, commissioner of customs of Canada, Ml 
during the past summer, visited some of the Hudson Bay posts, on the shores of Jamil 
Bay, and had, on inquiry, learned from Hudson's Bay officers, that duties had been p;'[ 
by the company to Newfoundland officers upon goods destined to that portion of tM 
Dominion on the shores of Ungava Bay, from which place they were distributed I* 
trading purposes in the interior of that portion of Canada. If this were the case, al 
there did not seem to be any doubt of it, the practice should not be continued, whateJi 
might be done in relation to such moneys as had been so collected in the past. He \k\ 
scarcely prepared to accept the proposition laid down by Sir William Whiteway, tn 
this was more of a matter between the "traders or importers and the customs officiji] 
than for the consideration of the respective governments." If duties had been improp.' 
ly collected by the customs officials of either government, upon goods which were fl 
consumption in the territory of another country, it was clearly a question of consideBl 
tion for those governments interested, and not for the trader or official. Such pow« 
could never be recognized as existing in an officer of any government. 

Mr. Chapleau added that the Hudson's Bay officers had informed Mr. Parmeli 
that the Newfoundland customs officers had collected duties at Rigoulette upon goqV 
which were known to be for consumption in Canadian territory in the neighbourhoods 
Ungava Bay. 

The question was allowed to stand over, pending further information as to tw 
actual practice in the past, at the Newfoundland ports referred to, and the value ajl 
quantity of goods which were so entered, if any, destined for consumption in Canada* 
being agreed by the delegates from both countries, that if irregularities of the charaejl 
under discussion had occurred, it was a matter of administration solely, and- would be})' 
disposed of. 

With reference to the boundary question, Sir William Whiteway said that t» 
delimitation was marked on a map which had been published, he understood, by auth 
ity of the Canadian government, and was now in the colonial secretary's office in j. 
John's, and which was quite acceptable to him as showing the true boundary. 

Mr. Harvey stated that he had never doubted but that the delimitation, as sho 1 ! 
on the map referred to, was final. 

Sir John Thompson explained that the map was merely a possible boundary S'l 
geated by the geographer of the department of the interior at Ottawa. That the g< 
eminent of Canada had understood that the question of boundary was yet undecided. 

Tlif question of the boundary in Labrador was further discussed for some time, al 
an examination was made of three different maps, in which different boundaries ; 
shown, none of which, Sir William Whiteway said, was the map referred to by him. 

THE BAIT QUESTION. 

The bail question was then introduced by Mr. Harvey, wdio stated that he was, J 
a great extent, the author of the bill, and was a member of the committee which fin^f 
prepared it. He explained that, at the time the statute was adopted, it was not intend 
that fishermen of Canada should be treated differently from those of Newfoundland, 1 
th.it the rights of fishermen of Newfoundland or of Canada to obtain licenses was 



iifit her case guaranteed. 



THE HOND-HLAINE CONVENTION. 



Sir William Whiteway suggested that it would, he thought, be desirable that 
Canadian delegates should make a statement to the conference of the reasons wh 
induced the Canadian government to protest the ratification of what was known as 
Bond Blaine convenl ion. 

28 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

far John Thompson reviewed the history of previous negotiations affecting the rela 
, of thr provinces of British North America with the United States, and pointed out, 
in thf Reciprocity 'Treaty of L854 (although the maritime provinces of British 
tli America \\ ere not represented in the negol iat ions), they (Newfoundland included) 
• riven an opportunity to avail themselves of the provisions of that treaty. Again, 
pi, when the Washington Treaty was effected, it contained a similar provision in 
ur of Newfoundland, although Newfoundland was not represented. When an agree- 
t was made with the administration of the United States in 1888, Newfoundland's 
vsts were protected. Her government was consulted at the various stages of the 
.nations and a provision was inserted requiring the consent of the legislature of the 
m. The practice had been from the earliest times, as regards negotiations between 
imperial government and foreign countries, that the interests of all her British 
th American colonies should be considered together, not only as regards fisheries 
uts, but also regarding matters affecting trade relations. 

The negotiations between Mr. Blaine and Mr. Bond were well advanced before the 
fulian government had become aware of them, as it first did through the press, 
awards an intimation came from the British minister at Washington that the con- 
ion was on the point of being concluded. Canada had no opportunity of being 



trd, and when she asked for the option to be included in any convention which might 

made, Mr. Blaine intimated that he would negotiate for a wider treaty with Canada. 

then reviewed the negotiations on the part of Canada, in conformity with Mr. Blaine's 

rgestion for a " wider arrangement." Negotiations had been entered upon by Canada, 

1 it was found that the "wider" arrangement would involve conditions which it 

ukl be impossible to accept. No arrangement, in short, could be effected without dis- 

, nination against Great Britain- — the practical adoption of the United States tariff — 

i the imposition of fiscal conditions which would practically give the United States 

fixing of a tariff for Canada. He pointed out that the Bond-Blaine convention would 

-ult in a discrimination against Canada, and that it was accompanied by restrictions 

ights and privileges which her fishermen had previously enjoyed and which were 

t imposed on United States fishermen. He suggested that the following principles 

•ukl be assented to : — 

(1.) That Canada as well as Newfoundland should have the right to take pat in 
h, or any negotiations which would affect the interests of both countries. 

(2.) That at the very least, no convention should be concluded which both countries 
>uld not have the option to avail themselves of. 

He quoted an address of the legislature of Newfoundland passed in 1852, asserting 
ese principles in relation to the negotiations for the treaty of 185-1. He also referred 
the decision of her majesty's government to the like purport when steps were being 
ken to effect a separate arrangement with Prince Edward Island. 

The efforts to obtain a fair arrangement with the United States were only relaxed 
len it was found that the conditions imposed would sow the seeds of imperial disin- 
flation; and he thought that any separate arrangement such as the Bond-Blaine con- 
ation, would divide the hitherto united interests of British American dependencies. 
He referred to the fact that the convention would accord to the United States 
hermen privileges in Newfoundland which were denied by the treaty of 1818, and 
it any abrogation of the provisions of that treaty would seriously affect Canadian 
hermen. The latter would therefore suffer from the discrimination before referred 
and from the loss of the benefits of the treaty of 1818. 

Sir William Whiteway asked the Canadian delegates whether, supposing for the 
ke of argument, a limited time was fixed to afford an opportunity for Canada to nego- 
ith the United States, and those negotiations becoming futile, they would persist 
their protest against the completion of the Bond-Blaine convention 1 In suggesting 
is question, he observed that if correct, as contended, and no doubt it was so, that the 
tides which under that convention would be admitted free to the United States from 
ewfoundland, it would be advantageous to Canada to have admitted free from there 
so, then if Canada could not obtain the concessions and Newfoundland could do so, 

29 



:. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 18 

would it not be beneficial to the empire as a whole, if a part could obtain the privil 
although the whole could not 1 Was it an evidence of friendliness for Canada to obj 
to Newfoundland to be benefited because Canada could not? He then went on toar; 
that the opening up of a new market in the United States for Newfoundland fish wo 
indirectly be beneficial to Canada in withdrawing the fish sent to the United States fi 
other markets. 

A discussion then followed as to the articles enumerated in the convention, and 
question of crude minerals having been mentioned, Mr. Bond stated, that althougl 
was not stipulated in the draft convention submitted to Sir Julian Pauncefote by 
Blaine, it was thoroughly understood that crude minerals should be admitted in 
event of a resolution of approval being adopted by the Boston chamber of comme 
This resolution of approval had been adopted, and he (Mr. Bond) had communica 
such to Sir Julian Pauncefote and "suggested the insertion of the words. 

Sir William White way, reviewing concisely the position of Newfoundland, 
fisheries, and the disabilities under which she laboured, consequent upon the Fre 
Treaty question, repeated his question and asked, whether in view of all the circ 
stances, in the event of Canada failing to secure a reciprocal arrangement for her - 
within a given time, she would persist in her refusal to acquiesce in a convention secujd 
by Newfoundland 1 

Sir John Thompson thought that the Canadian delegates should hardly be aske<i - 
make a pledge in advance. It would be only fair to see what the grounds might be^ . 
which equal arrangements w T ould be refused to Canada, assuming that they were tc I 
refused. If they were refused on the ground of Canada's fidelity to the interests of j 
empire, Canada could not be blamed for asking that the protection of her lnajes 
government should still be extended to her people against a convention which w 
injure their interests. 

Sir William White way contended that Canada would not be injured, but ^v- 
foundland would be benefited by the Bond-Blaine convention. 

Mr. Harvey reviewed the circumstances which led up to the Bond-Blaine convent I 
He stated that in all previous negotiations, more particularly those of 1854, lfl 
and 1888, Newfoundland was not represented. That while it was true that she jat 
given the option of becoming a party to such arrangements iis had been effected, y<jlb 
was equally true that her interests had been sacrificed in each case. That she m 
watched with interest the negotiations made in 1888 between Canada and the Vim 
States, and attributed their failure, not to diverse trade interests, so much as to o'ei 
questions in dispute between the two countries. He considered that .the failure of W 
was due almost entirely to the irritated state of public feeling in the United States 1tl 
reference to such questions as the "Canal Tolls" and " Behring Sea" difficulty. 

In view of this it was thought desirable by the government of Newfoundland 
enter into negotiations on her own account. With this in view she made applies 
and eventually received the consent of the imperial government to enter upon such ik>- 
fciations. The result of these negotiations was entirely satisfactory to the go verm;" 
of Newfoundland, and, as he believed, not inimical to the interests of Canada. He 
sidered it rather unjustifiable on the part of the Canadian government that they shall 
refuse to allow Newfoundland to profit by these privileges simply because Canada i 
not participate. • 

He lucidly pointed out the peculiar position in which Newfoundland was ] 
on accounl of the fact that she had only one great industry. That her chief ind 
had been crippled by the aggressiveness of the French, in asserting their alleged ri 
which had virtually driven Newfoundland fish from the markets of Europe. Hel 
mitted thai Canada did not afford any market, at present, for the products of 
foundland, the herring trade with the province of Quebec having been crowded oi : 
the deyelopmenl of the frozen fish trade of the maritime provinces of Canada. Ii I 
extremity, Newfoundland had looked to the almost unlimited markets of the UJt* 
States and had mel with a very satisfactory response. He referred to this a 
roborating his previously expressed opinion that the United States was not unw| 



30 






Newfoundland and Canada. 



iter into reciprocal arrangements with British colonics with which no outside 
questions were pending. He referred fco Sir John Thompson's statement that, 
traditions regarding the treatment of the fisheries in British North America, they 
jlways been considered the property of the empire and not the property of the 
tees to which they were adjacent. In this connection lie pointed OUl that this 
had first been violated by Canada, when, in 1885, she adopted a statute which 
authority fco levy duty upon fish imported from Newfoundland, while Canadians 
indisputed right fco fish in all Newfoundland waters and take the fish there 
it by them into the Dominion without payment of duties. In view of this fact, he 
nded that it hardly became Canada to attribute to Newfoundland a violation of 
litional usage. He appealed to the Canadian delegates to act with justice and 
fiity, and fco endeavour fco appreciate the peculiar position in which Newfoundland 
at present placed. 

Sir John Thompson replied that, while it was true that the statute of 1885 applied to 

countries, including Newfoundland, it was not to be forgotten that that act had not 

en put into operation until after the "Bait Act" had been adopted by the legislature 

Newfoundland, and in fact, not until after the Bond-Blaine convention had been 

sgotiated. He considered this a sufficient answer to the suggestion of Mr. Harvey 

mada had taken the first step towards the violation of the long-established usage 

ferred to. 

Mr. Bond handed in the following returns presented by the customs department 
Newfoundland, being from the 1st January to 31st December in each respective 



Calendar Years. 


Imports 
from Canada. 


Imports from 
United States. 


Exports to 
Canada. 


Exports to 
United States. 


m 








2,126,840 
2,340,138 
2,150,016 
2,040,547 
1,937,605 
1,986,229 
2,041,144 
2,076,258 
2,423,319 
2,499,945 


$ 

2,214,733 

2,839,302 
2,145,928 
1,955,278 
1,671,810 
1,337,322 
1,602,138 
1,615,143 
1,247,754 
1,526,674 


$ 

404,090 
397,176 
332,675 
231,173 
195,245 
312,084 
482,497 
489,367 
631,104 
794,844 


308,722 
589,673 
291,137 
196, 79<', 

288,453 





258,057 






m 


327,925 
485,202 
452,100 


*91 


580,577 



Mr. Chapleau presented detailed returns of the trade between Canada and New- 
foundland during the last five years, as shown by the Canadian trade returns. The 
•Mowing is a recapitulated summary : — 



IMPORTS FROM NEWFOUNDLAND. 



Fiscal Year. 



89a 



Total Imports. 



426,769 
488,874 
470,362 
751,121 
925,056 



Total 
Free Goods. 



Total Dutiable. 



396,480 
484,623 
460,545 
736,724 
698,104 



31 



30,289 
4,251 
9,817 

14,397 
226,952 



Entered for 

Home 
Consumption. 



$ 

421,599 
488,050 
469,639 
751,003 
753,249 



Duty 

collected. 



3,211 
1,087 
3,386 
3,452 
4,191 



56 Victoria. 


1 

Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 18qj 

EXPORTS TO NEWFOUNDLAND. 


Fiscal Year. 


Total Exports. 

1,523,827 
1,303,335 
1,185,739 
1,467,908 
1,750,714 


Produce of Canada. 


Not the 
Produce of Canada. 1 


1888 

1889 

1890 


1,422,802 
1,147,681 
982,154 
1,312,621 
1,533,607 


101,025 
155,654 
203,585 
155,287 
217,107 


1891 


1892 



He pointed out that the trade between Newfoundland and Canada was of no mel 
importance, and was in the aggregate nearly equal to that carried on between NeB 
foundland and the United States. He impressed upon the Newfoundland delegates tl 
friendly spirit which had always been evinced by Canada as illustrated by the fact th.l 
although the Customs Act empowered the Canadian government to collect duties on tl 
imported from Newfoundland, its provisions had been held in suspense, so far as trl 
colony was concerned, with the exception of two or three months, when through tl 
irritation of the Bait Act it had been allowed to go into operation. 

Mr. Harvey explained that the amount of Newfoundland fish which appeared 
" Entered for home consumption " in the Canadian trade returns, was misleadiiB 
Almost the whole of this fish was transhipped from Canadian ports to other countriH 
and was merely entered at the customs to avoid the cost and trouble of warehousiil 
As to the duty not having been exacted, though enacted on Newfoundland fish in 18M 
the Newfoundland government, at his (Mr. Harvey's) suggestion, immediately i 
learning of the imposition of duty on Newfoundland fish, inserted a clause in their ta:B 
imposing a heavy differential duty on articles coming from any country, which possess] 
the right to use Newfoundland fisheries, and still impose a duty on fishery produH 
when exported from the island. This automatic clause caused the merchants and mill j* 
of Canada to bring such pressure to bear on their government that the duties were xfl 
exacted on Newfoundland fish. 

Mr. Bowell pointed out that the Trade and Navigation Returns of Canada did it 
bear out that statement. These returns showed clearly the quantity of fish import! 
from Newfoundland and entered for home consumption in Canada, and also the quantB 
imported from the same colony and subsequently exported. Entries would not bemn 
as indicated by Mr. Harvey. If an entry were made for immediate exportation.* 
would be so entered in the customs returns. The trade in Newfoundland fish, parti - 
laily herring, was of much greater importance than indicated by Mr. Harvey. He tni 
explained how these statistics were kept, contending that they were in the main correB 
and that if any errors existed, it would be in the omission by the officials in enters 
fche full quantity imported. 

A desultory discussion followed, after which the conference adjourned urB 
Thursday, at 10 o'clock a.m. 

W. V. WHITEWAY, Chairman. M. BOWELL, 
1!. BOND. J. A. CHAPLEAU. 

A. W. HARVEY. JOHN S. D. THOMPSON. 

DOUGLAS STEWART, .Secretary. 



Thursday, 10th November, 1892. 
ill the delegates being present. 



Conference resumed at 10 o'clock 

THE liOND-BLAINE CONVENTION. 

of the Bond-Blaine convention was continued. 



( 'onsideral to 

Mr. Bond discussed the points referred to by Sir John Thompson during 
previous day's proceedings and dwelt particularly on the suggestion made, that in 

32 



Newfoundland and ( !anada. 

, limis affecting the interests of the British North American colonies, all those 
ependencies should be consulted, lit- referred to the manner in which Newfoundland 

ts hud been sacrificed or neglected, during the progress of previous negotiations, 
mi 1 traced the various measures adopted by Newfoundland, in her endeavours to secure 

rht to negotiate for herself with regard to trade and fishery matters. He con- 
dered that Sir John Thompson's contention with regard to joint negotiations was 
illy answered by the fact that, although Canada had participated in various negotia- 
ons from time to time, Newfoundland had never been asked or invited to have her 

its represented. He traced the various steps taken by Newfoundland to secure a 
ah\ to be heard in her own interests, and the consent eventually given by the imperial 
overnment in 1890, which resulted in the Bond-Blaine convention. These efforts to 
'.tain the right to negotiate, as well as the various steps in connection with the con- 
dition under discussion, had, he submitted, been properly and regularly taken, as 
ould appear by the despatches in connection therewith, which were on file in the 
►lonial ottice. The negotiations for a separate treaty extended over a lengthened 
eriod, and it was to be presumed that the Canadian government had been advised of 
ic same by the imperial government. 

He proceeded to discuss the points at issue and the contentions of Sir John 
bompson with regard to the discriminatory effect on Canada. When negotiating the 
►nvention he had distinctly assured Mr. Blaine that no discrimination, would, nor 
mid be attempted by his government as regards Canada. He referred to the lower 
i riff suggested on flour and pork, and stated that the changes in the tariff could only 
b consummated by a revision of the Customs Act, which revision must necessarily be 
lbject to the royal assent. He presumed that this assent would not be given if it 
tould be found that the changes involved a discrimination against other British clepen- 
encies. This, he considered, was sufficient protection to Canadian interests. He fully 
incurred in Sir John Thompson's contention that the rights of a colony could not be 
i well protected by indirect representation as if directly represented during negotia- 
nts. In this connection he submitted that Canada had not acted on that principle 
luring the negotiations of 1888. While it was true that Sir James Winter had been 
insulted with regard to these negotiations, it was equally true that he had never been 
:corded an opportunity to appear before the plenipotentiaries, and that as a result 
Important interests of Newfoundland were overlooked. Referring to the suggestion 

anada should have been included in any negotiations with Newfoundland, he said 
"wt'oundland had never objected to Canada being included in such. He pointed out 
iat no such objection had been made on the part of Canada to the negotiations until 
tter it had been publicly announced that the negotiations were successful. He closed 
iv r distinctly asserting that the convention did not involve any discrimination against 
anada, nor did it involve a lowering of the duties exacted, generally, from United 

products. With the exception of the articles he had mentioned, flour and pork, 

is specification of the duties to be exacted on United States products was merely a 

uarantee that those duties should not be increased during the term of the convention, 

bd he repeated the opinion expressed by his colleagues, that Canada had no right to 

against an arrangement merely on the grounds that it gave to Newfoundland 

bages which Canada had repeatedly attempted to obtain in vain. He could not 

ie that it would be seriously contended, now that it had been found impossible 
r Canada to conclude an arrangement with the United States for reciprocal trade, 

my injustice was done by the endeavour on the part of Newfoundland to obtain 

' ification of the Bond-Blaine convention. In reply to a question put by Sir 
illiam Whiteway, he understood Sir John Thompson to say that if the United States 
ntinued to exhibit illwill towards the Dominion, or ventured to carry out the threats 

liation which had been made, the Dominion government would have to persist in 

position to the Newfoundland convention. He pointed out the great injustice of 
l'U a position, contending that it was tantamount to a declaration that Newfoundland 

differ for acts committed by the United States and for which Newfoundland was 
no way responsible. He hoped that he had misunderstood Sir John Thompson's 
>int 

33 
20d, e, /— 3 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 189; 

Mr. Chapleau asked the Newfoundland delegates whether they questioned th 
right of Canada to appeal to the imperial authorities for protection in trade negotiation 
in which they considered their interests were being prejudiced. 

Mr. Harvey would not go so far as to deny the right of Canada to protest, but wha 
he objected to was that she should persist in her protest in view of the explanations an 
reasonable assurances which had been given. 

Mr. Chapleau asked if it was to be understood that the convention did not involv 
any disadvantage to any of the provinces of British North America, and if the delegate 
from Newfoundland were prepared to give assurances that under no circumstance 
should such discrimination be made ? 

Mr. Bond, " certainly." He thought it should be remembered in considering thi 
question that for many years Canada had obtained from the United States certain coi 
cessions under treaty in return for privileges, which Newfoundland alone could furnisli 
He referred to the bait privileges. Up to last year it was believed by the United Stata 
that Canada was able to supply her fishermen with all the bait they required. This idt 
had been exploded by the enforcement of the Bait Act against Canadian fishermen la> 
year, for it was then clearly demonstrated that Canada had not a sufficiency of bait t 
meet her own requirements, and that Newfoundland held the key of the position as A 
gards the Canadian, the United States and French bank fishing. He took the positio! 
that, if Canada desired in future to obtain concessions from the United States in e: 
change for privileges which it was now evident that Newfoundland could alone confe, 
it was another reason why the colony should demand and expect the withdrawal < 
Canada's protest. 

Mr. Bowell pointed out that the provisions of the proposed treaty did not, in h 
opinion, bear out the interpretation put upon it by Mr. Bond. There was a distill 
provision in the convention that flour and other articles, the product of the Unite! 
States, should be admitted into Newfoundland at a lower rate of duty than that charge 
upon the same articles when imported from other countries. He could find no provisi< 
giving the same advantages to Canada . On the contrary, the Americans had stipulate 
that in the case of a reduction of duty on these articles when imported from other couii 
tries, a like reduction should be made on the articles mentioned in the treaty, when ii 
ported from the United States, which seemed to imply that the same difference in dm) 
in favour of the United States should be continued during the existence of the treat 
if ratified. He could not conceive it possible that Great Britain would refuse to gi\ 
her consent to a tariff act, as suggested by Mr. Bond, passed by the Newfoundlai 
l<LMslature, to give effect to a treaty which had been ratified with her consent, n 
would Canada ask her to do so after consenting to the ratification of the treaty. 1! 
believed Mr. Blaine intended, when he accepted the wording of that paragraph, that 
discrimination against Canada should be secured, and he misunderstood the Amerio 
character if they would allow any changes to be made in the wording of the propoa 
treaty, such as had been intimated by Mr. Bond. 

Mr. Bond said that granting for the sake of argument Mr. Bowell's contention w 

correct, l\ must be remembered that Newfoundland had given the most positij 

Lranoes to the imperial government and to Canada of its willingness to take su 

steps as might be deemed necessary to assure that there would be no discriminati« 

against < ianadian products. 

Sir William Whiteway repeated his question asked yesterday, whether, in t 
event of Canadian negotiations with the United States proving futile, Canada wou 
perBisI in her protest against the Bond-Blaine convention 1 He thought it eminently 
desirable thai there should be a clear understanding upon this point, and therefore [•' 
trusted that there might be a definite reply, for such reply might affect future action.lj 

Sir John Thompson stated that under such circumstances as at present exist, it 
probable that th« protest will be pressed, but that circumstances might arrive whi 
would induce Canada to withdraw her objections. He referred to the manner in whij 
Mr. P.laine had received the suggestion that the convention should, with some modi 
cations, apply to Canada, and stated that, in the event" of such a proposition bei 



34 






Newfoundland and Canada. 

iccepted by the United States government, Canada would, he thought, be disposed fco 
relinquish ;ill opposition to the convention. 

[n an answer to a question by Sir John Thompson, Mi-. Bond explained that the 

term "Newfoundland waters" used in the convention, should have been the "produce 
.f thf sail water fisheries of Newfoundland," wheresoever they mighl be. He had 
isked for an amendment of Mr. Blaine's draft of the convention to make thai plain. 

Sir John Thompson said that in that ease, the catch of Newfoundland fishermen <>n 

: he coast of Canadian Labrador and on the Banks would be admit ted free by the [Jnited 

States, while the catch of the Canadian fishermen at the same places and in the same 

would be subject to duties. This discrimination in the United States markets 

ig&inst Canadians was a serious matter, and required grave consideration. 

Mr. Harvey referred to the discussion which had taken place and the explanations 
given, and stated that to his mind the question was confined to the following objections 
>n the part of Canada : 

(1.) Canada fears a differential tariff. 

(2.) Bait restrictions. 

(3.) Canada insists that licenses shall be issued stipulating the privileges accorded 
foreign fishermen. 

(4.) Canada should have her fish free in the United States. 

With reference to these he was prepared, with concurrence of the premier of New- 
foundland, to give the following assurances : 

(1.) That a satisfactory guarantee will be given by Newfoundland that no differ- 
■ntial tariff will be enacted. 

(2.) That the same guarantee will be accorded that the fishermen of Canada shall 
tave, and continue to have the same rights and privileges as the fishermen of Newfound- 
Mid. 

(3.) That a system of licenses will be adopted, based on the system in practice under 
he mndus vivendi. 

There only remained the stipulation that Canada should have her fish free of duty 
d the United States market, a matter which is entirely out of the power of Newfound- 
ami to give. 

W r ith these assurances he asked the Canadian delegates whether they would not 
• insider the propriety of relinquishing their protest against the convention. 

Mr. Chapleau pointed out that the alleged concessions mentioned by Mr. Harvey 
\cre enjoyed by Canada in common with Newfoundland previous to the irritation 
irising from the present difficulty. 

Mr. Bo well drew attention to the fact that there was no provision in the Newfound- 
ind Customs Act to exempt Canadian fish from duty. 

Mr. Harvey stated that Newfoundland had never treated fish taken in Canadian 
iters as "foreign" fish, notwithstanding that Canada had treated Newfoundland fish 
- foreign caught, and so taxed it, and by the clause in her tariff of 1885 had made 
Newfoundland fish exactly the same as United States "foreign" fish. 

MODUS VIVENDI LICENSE FEES. 

Sir William Whiteway called attention to the fact that Canada had never made 
pplication to the government of Newfoundland for a statement of the amount received 
y that colony for licenses under the modus vivendi. He complained of the irregular 
rocedure on the part of the minister of marine of Canada in applying to the honour- 
Mr James Winter for official information, for which the government of Newfound- 
tnd should have been applied to. 

He noticed that Sir James Winter had written to the honourable Mr. Tupper to 
ie effect that the government of Newfoundland had refused information as regards 
hese licenses. From inquiries made he had learned that Sir James Winter was in error 
i making such a statement. The information had not been asked for, much less re- 
used, and this question of the division of license fees might have been settled had 
pplication been made direct by the Dominion government to the government of New- 
'inuUand, and friction upon this point avoided. 

35 
20rf, e t /-3£ 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 20d to 20f.) 



A. 1893 



BAIT QUESTION JOINT ACTION. 

A discussion then ensued as to the proposal on the part of Newfoundland that 
Canada should aid in protecting the bait fisheries of Newfoundland from depletion. 

Sir William Whiteway pointed out that the attempt on the part of Newfoundland | 
to protect her fishing interests against French bounty-fed competition had been greatly j 
hampered : 

(1.) By the infringement of the Bait Act by Canadian fishermen, and the want of 
authority to prosecute offenders in the courts of Canada, and 

(2.) By the fact that although the colony prohibited the sale of bait fishes to French] 
fishermen, the latter were able to obtain a large amount of bait from the Canadian fish- J 
ermen, who brought it, not only by smuggling from the Newfoundland coast, but also, 
from the Magdalen Islands and other parts of the Dominion coasts. 

Mr. Chapleau suggested that in view of the fact that Canada was just now endea-| 
vouring to secure improved trade relations with France, the time was hardly opportune 
to place restrictions upon her fishermen. 

Mr. Bo well thought this question to be one for serious consideration, and asked the 
Newfoundland delegates whether action, with a view to suppressing the sale of bait 
French fishermen, would be of any particular benefit to Newfoundland. 

Mr. Harvey assured the Canadian delegates that any action by the Canadian gov- 
ernment in the line suggested, would be of immense benefit to Newfoundland and wouk 
be greatly appreciated by her citizens. He desired to remind the Canadian delegat 
that the question of concurrent action in this matter had been considered by the hon.fi 
Mr. Howlan, who, he understood, had reported favourably upon it. The suggestion hf 
also been conveyed to the Canadian government through their high commissioner in 
London, as was shown in the published despatches. He desired also to add that New-| 
foundland and Canada had each taken its respective course with regard to the treatment 
of the United States fishermen, after the expiration of the Washington Treaty, without 
consultation with the other. 

Mr. Bowell said he was surprised to hear, that statement, as his recollection w* 
that Newfoundland not only knew what was being done, but concurred in the arrai 
ment, and arranged for a division of the fees collected. He would look into it and brim 
up the question at a future meeting of the conference. 

MODUS VIVENDI LICENSE FEES. 

Mr. Bond said there would appear to be some misunderstanding as regards tin 
returns of license fees collected by the respective governments from American fishermei 
under the modus vivendi of 1888. It had been agreed between the governmc 
Canada and Newfoundland that the fees so collected were to be equally divided. Tin! 
Newfoundland customs department complained of the non-receipt of such returns, ;u 
qo <li\ ision of fees had taken place. He was in a position to furnish the conference wil 
a ict tut! of the fees collected by Newfoundland, and asked that the Canadian retiu 
mighl be laid before the commission. 

The question was allowed to stand. 

NEWFOUNDLAND ASSURANCES. 



Mr. Bowel] then asked (he Newfoundland delegates to state definitely their attitj 
with regard t<. the assurances which had been given by their predecessors that the 
vdsione of 'In' Bait Act should not apply to Canadian fishermen. 

Sir William Whit cw ay stated that while he felt the lor'ce of the position, th| 
succeeding government was obliged to cany out the engagements made by their pi 
cessors, yel it must be remembered that the assurances referred to were not contains 
a minute of the executive council of Newfoundland — they were never communicate 
the legislature that there was no record of them — that the promises were made by 
Robert ThoTburh, then premier, by Sir James Winter, then attorney-general, and 
Sn Ambrose Shea, who was not, a member of the government — that the fact of si 

3ti 



Newfoundland and ( Canada. 

pfoniises having been made was only known t<» him (Sir William Whlteway) and his 
o©lleagues long after they had come into office, and after a different policy had been 
adopted. Ilnw could Mich a promise override an act and indicate who should or should 
not be affected by it .' Although he made these remarks he admitted the force of the 
Canadian position, that they had been induced to withdraw opposition bo the Bail Ad 
lt\ t hese promises. 

Mr. Bowel] said he was glad to hear the assurances given by Sir William, as any 
gfcher course would destroy the continuity of any government. Without these assur- 
feces it is not likely that Canada would have withdrawn her opposition to the sanction- 
ing of tlit' act by her majesty's government, nor is it likely her majesty's sanction 
would have been given to the act had Canada persisted in opposing it. 

Conference adjourned until Friday at 10 o'clock. 

W. Y. WHITEWAY, Chairman. M. BOWELL, 
Et. BOND, J. A. CHAPLEAU, 

A. W. HARVEY, JOHN S. D. THOMPSON, 

DOUGLAS STEWART, Secretary 



Halifax, 11th November. 1892. 
Conference resumed 10.30 o'clock. 

BAIT ACT JOINT ACTION. 

Sir John Thompson continued the consideration of the desire expressed by New- 
foundland that Canada should adopt legislation to aid in the enforcement of the New- 
foundland Bait Act. He called Sir William Whiteway's attention to the doubt as to 
the power to adopt legislation against offences committed outside of Canadian territory. 
He intimated the willingness of the Canadian government to facilitate in any way pro- 
ceedings for the penalties incurred in connection with bonds. The right to sue on such 
bonds existed now, but it might be that further facilities could be afforded as to matters 
of procedure. 

Sir William Whiteway expressed great pleasure at the intimation given by Sir John 
Thompson, admitted the doubt as to the validity of the legislation involving control out- 
side of territorial waters, but said that what Newfoundland really required was the 
power to prosecute in Canadian courts and to enforce the penalties of fine, imprisonment 
and confiscation as though the proceedings were being had in the courts of Newfound- 
I land. 

DIVERSITY OF ACTION, 1886-8. 

I Mr. Bowell called attention to a statement made by Mr. Harvey at a previous 

meeting, that Canada had originated and carried into effect the modus Vivendi system of 
; fishing licenses without in any w r ay consulting Newfoundland. He pointed out that, on 
i the contrary, before the modus vivendi system w r as adopted, the government of New- 
foundland was consulted, as shown by public despatches which he quoted, and that the 
government of Newfoundland had transmitted several suggestions as to details, some of 
which were adopted by the Canadian government — notably that with reference to the 
duration of the licenses. 

Mr. Harvey explained that, in making the statement Mr. Bowell referred to, he 
had reference to the action of the Canadian government, taken at the expiry of the 
Washington Treaty. 

Sir" John Thompson pointed out that the concession made by Canada at that time 
was this : — The Washington treaty having expired during the fishing season, and the 
president of the United States having given an assurance that he would bring the ques- 
tion of the fisheries, by message, before congress at its next session, recommending a 
commission to consider the whole subject, the Canadian government had thereupon with- 

37 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 1893 

held the enforcement of the provisions of the treaty of 1818, during the remainder off 
that season only. 

The United States having failed to act on the president's suggestion, the Canadians! 
government made provision for a vigorous enforcement of the provisions of the treaty off' 
1818. These provisions were enforced in Canadian waters from the beginning of the; 
season of 1886 until the adoption of the modus vivendi which accompanied the treaty of j' 
February, 1888. 

Mr. Harvey stated that the policy pursued by the Newfoundland government be-i 
tween the expiry of the Washington treaty and the adoption of the modus vivenqf 
referred to, was one of suspense. No attempt was made by them to enforce the pro-i 
vision of the treaty of 1818, and during the period referred to the United States 
enjoyed all the privileges in Newfoundland ports and waters, which they had underj 
the fishery articles of the treaty of Washington. 

Mr. Chapleau pointed out that this exceptional conduct on the part of the govern-i 
ment of Newfoundland, namely, the suspension of the provisions of the treaty of 1818,) 
was really the first instance in which either country had undertaken to deal with fish-i 
ery matters locally and separately from the other.. 

He referred to the complaint made by Mr. Harvey, that the interests of New-J 
foundland had been sacrificed by the treaty of 1871, and expressed surprise that under! 
such circumstances Newfoundland should have continued privileges of 'the treaty with- 
out compensation for three years after its legal expiry. 

ST. PIERRE CONSULATE. 

Mr. Bowell brought to the attention of the conference the difficulty experienced! 
by the customs department at Ottawa in protecting the gulf ports against smuggling, 
owing to the facilities afforded by the proximity of St. Pierre as a basis for operations. 
He asked the Newfoundland delegates whether they did not consider it advisable that 
a joint application should be made by the two governments to the imperial authorities! 
with a view to the appointment of a British consul at St. Pierre. 

Sir William W'hiteaway stated that the Newfoundland government had usedj 
every possible endeavour to secure the appointment of a consul there, but that their 
application had not been successful. On behalf of his government, he would state that; 
they would gladly acquiesce in Mr. Bowell's suggestion. 

Whereupon it was agreed, that a joint application should be made to the imperial 
government urging the appointment of a British consul and assistant consul at St. 
Pierre, the former to be paid by Canada and the latter by Newfoundland. 

BAIT ACT JOINT ACTION. 

Sir William Whiteway referred to the promise and assurance of his predecessors 
with reference to the Bait Act, and asked the Canadian delegates to state what actionj 
they woe prepared to take with a view to the successful enforcement of the act. Hej 
pointed out the fact that the successful operation of the act would be alike a benefit 
to Canada and to Newfoundland, inasmuch as experience had shown that it would' 
reduce the catch of the French fishermen, and thereby leave a larger market open to' 
the fishermen of the British provinces. 

Sir John Thompson said they were not prepared to give any further assurancei 
than that ( lanada would enact legislation to the extent of her power to do so, to enforce; 
penalties of bonds executed under the Bait Act, in order to prevent violation of the 
ac1 by Canadian fisher n. 

Sir William Whiteway asked if Canada would pass a Bait Act similar to the New- 
foundland Act. 

Sir .John Thompson could not give an answer to that question without submitting 
t In- matter t<» Ins colleagues. 

Mr. Harvey referred to the difficulties attending the enforcement of the act,! 
especially of securing <-\ Ldence to convict parties who had violated its provisions. He 
also quoted statistics which showed that the act had been, to a certain extent, success- 

38 



Newfoundland and ( lanada. 

il, having during the term of its operation resulted in reducing the catch by French 

shermen to t lie extent of 50 per cent. He was willing to admit thai this was nol 

bolly due to the enforcement of the Bail Act, but was nevertheless largely the result 

Another good effect, principally attributable to the act, was the fact that the 

of Newfoundland tish had gone up from 12 shillings to 15 shillings during the 

eriod of its enforcement. The year before the Bait Act was passed, a great deal of 

sh was sold in Newfoundland at 5 shillings per quintal, and many whole cargoes were 

n overboard in the Mediterranean. He pointed out that the evil effects of the 

Vench bounty system were not confined to Newfoundland. Thai Nova Scotia fisher- 

icii also sutler from the policy of granting bounties to French fishermen. As an illus- 

ration, Nova Scotia fishermen from the Banks, and French fishermen arriving in 

lalit'ax with cargoes, at the same time, would reap very different results. 

The Nova Scotia fishermen would probably receive at the rate of $3.50 per quintal, 
The French fishermen would receive the same price, and in addition would secure from 
he French government $2.40, or in round figures, $6 per quintal. 

Mr. Chapleau inquired whether, as a matter of fact, Nova Scotia fishermen 
applied bait to any extent to the French. 

Mr. Harvey stated that the supply by Nova Scotia fishermen undoubtedly did much 
render nugatory the provisions of the act. Not only was this the case, but American 
Labermen also, availing themselves of the Canadian licenses, procured cargoes of bait at 
ape Breton and the Magdalen Islands, which was supplied to the French thereby 
aabling French fishermen to evade the Bait Act. If Canada passed no Bait Act to 
'•strain her fishermen from supplying bait taken in Canadian waters to the French at 
>t. Pierre, and had free access to Newfoundland supplies of bait, the consequence would 
be that the Canadians would supply St. Pierre so far as the supply would suffice from 
Magdalen Islands and Cape Breton, and the Canadian banking fleet would go to 
Newfoundland for bait for their own use, and thus largely frustrate the object aimed 
it by the Newfoundland Bait Act. Nothing would fully secure that object except a 
Bait Bill applying to bait taken in Canadian waters as well as in Newfoundland waters. 
In reply to a question put by Sir John Thompson, Mr. Harvey stated the fact that an 
agent of the Newfoundland government, who visited St. Pierre, had reported that two 
vessels laden with bait were at that port supplying the French with 2,000 barrels of 
bait. One of these was an American vessel under license from the Canadian govern- 
ment, the other was a Nova Scotia vessel, both from Magdalen Islands. This was but 
one instance, but it clearly illustrated the practice which was being carried on to the 
detriment of Newfoundland. It was not easy to get Newfoundland fishermen to give 
evidence of the Nova Scotians supplying bait at St. Pierre, because the fact of New- 
foundland fishermen being in St. Pierre at the same time was prima facie evidence of 
theii having themselves violated the law. 

Sir William Whiteway did not dispute the right of Canada to remonstrate against 
the loyal assent being given to any act which she might consider detrimental to her 
interests. He contended, however, that the protest made by Canada was made under 
the mistaken supposition that the act would be prejudicial. He referred to the state- 
ments set forth by his colleague, Mr. Harvey, and to the assurances and explanations 
which had been given during the progress of the conference, and asked the Canadian 
delegates whether, in view of these assurances, they did not consider that they should 
waive the exaction of the promise made by the late government of Newfoundland, and 
also withdraw their protest against the completion of the Bond-Blaine convention. 

Sir John Thompson called attention to the fact, that the question of the bait supply 
to Canadian fishermen and that relating to the Bond-Blaine convention were two 
distinct matters. The grievance of Canada with regard to bait had been temporarily 
removed, but he would like to be assured as to the action of the government of New- 
foundland in the future. 

Mr. Bond stated that there was a difficulty in giving any assurance. When the 
act was under consideration by the assembly, he had asked the question of the 
government of that day, whether it was intended that the act should apply to Canadian 



39 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 18S 

fishermen. Sir James Winter, then attorney-general, from his place in the house, gal.i 
the most distinct and positive assurance that the act was intended to apply to Canadia 
as well as French and American fishermen. That was a matter of record. It appear 
by correspondence which the Canadian representatives had tabled, that Sir James Wintr 
had also given the imperial and Canadian governments the most positive assuranl 
that the Bait Act should not apply to Canadian fishermen (as had Sir Robert Thorbuij 
the then premier, who was at the time in London), but there was no evidence that til 
promise was made with the concurrence of the executive council of Newfoundland. 2 
a matter of fact, there was no minute indicating that the matter had ever been brougl 
before that council. The legislature, which was in session when the assurance wj 
given, was not acquainted of the fact, and the present legislature, with those fac 
before them, had decided that the undertaking of Sir James Winter and Sir Robe 
Thorburn was in no way binding upon them as a legislature, and had declared that tl 
act should be enforced against Canadian fishermen. Under these circumstances, 
would be appreciated how difficult it was for the delegates to give the assurance asked f< 

Sir John Thompson pointed out that the royal assent was given on the assurainj 
that the provisions of the act would not be enforced against Canada, and that tli 
government of Newfoundland could not take the benefit of the royal assent withoi 
assuming the obligations attached to it and on which that assent was given. H 
pointed out reasons why he thought Canadian fishermen should be put on the san 
footing as those of Newfoundland. 

(I.) The assurance given by Newfoundland in order to secure the royal assent. 

(2.) The spirit of comity which should exist between the colonies. 

(3.) The doubt which existed in view of the opinion of the law officers of tlj 
crown as to the right of the government of Newfoundland to impose exceptional trea, 
ment on Canadian fishermen. 

Sir William Whiteway — Are you willing to carry out any legislation which ma 
be constitutional with a view to assist in carrying out the Bait Act? 

Sir John Thompson — We are willing to adopt any legislation which may 1 
constitutional to prevent our fishermen from violating your Bait Act after obtainiq 
your bait. 

Sir William Whiteway — Would it be proper to state to what extent legislatio 
would be granted ? 

Sir John Thompson stated that to do so would involve a careful consideration ( 
the legal question which he had before referred to. 

Whereupon it was agreed that the question of the extent to which aid might legal] 
be given should be fully considered by Sir William Whiteway, Sir John Thompson an 
Mr. Chapleau, with a view to ascertaining what might properly be done. 



BOND-BLAINE CONVENTION. 

Adverting to the Bond-Blaine convention, Sir William Whiteway asked if th 
Newfoundland delegates were to understand that all that the Canadian delegate} 
required was that time should be given with a view to some satisfactory arrangemei 
of a similar kind between the United States and Canada, and that in the event of sue 
proving unsuccessful Canada would be prepared to withdraw all opposition to the cod 
summation of the Bond Blaine convention. 

Sir John Thompson stated that Canada could not be expected to waive her rigbj 
to appeal bo her majesty's government against the completion of any convention prejd 
dicial to her inter, 

Sir \\ illiain Whiteway said that the immediate issue would seem to be : " WoulJ 
the convention be detrimental to Canadian interests ? "—and he thought that it haj 
been clearly shbwn thai the convention would not prove detrimental to the interest! 
0* Canada, inasmuch as the diversion of the Newfoundland fish trade into a nevj 
channel would leave the markel formerly supplied by that trade open to be supplied bj 
( 'anada. 

40 



Mr. 



Newfoundland and Canada. 



Mr. Chapleau stated that the reason given by Mr. Bond for the negotiation of the 
invention was, in effect, that no other profitable markets were available. Such being 
e, Canadian fishermen would not profit greatly by assuming the privilege of sup- 
lying markets which it would, from his statement, appear did not exist. 

Mr. Harvey contended that the effect of the convention would be to the advan- 
Lge of the fishermen of Newfoundland and Canada, and to the disadvantage of the 
shermen of the United States. As regards the herring trade especially, Newfound- 
md fishermen would take the place of American fishermen and supply the American 
larket, thus leaving Canadian fishermen free from the competition which they had 
itherto experienced in attempting to cope with the fishermen of Newfoundland. 

With reference to cod oil, he contended that the large production of Newfound- 
.iid would be directed, to a very great extent, to the American market, where it would 
Bplace pogy oil, which is now being used in immense quantities in tanning and other 
nlustries. His mercantile experience led him to believe that the withdrawal of this 
roduct from the markets of Great Britain would increase the price in those markets at 
mst 10 per cent. This would undoubtedly be to the advantage of Canadian fishermen. 

As to codfish, the Newfoundland production would supplant the American catch, 
tasmuch as the Americans were not able to compete with Newfoundland fishermen on 
ijiial terms, and the withdrawal from other markets of a large portion of codfish hithei t<» 
applied by Newfoundland must necessarily raise the price in these markets. 

He did not contend that the two countries w r ould be equally benefited, but by way 
! comparison, he estimated that if Newfoundland should be benefited to an extent 
qual to 50 per cent, Canada would be benefited to at least 15 per cent. To impress 
poii the conference the sincerity of this view he cited his opinion as expressed in a 
qnfidential memorandum which he had presented to Lord Knutsford, and which had 
advertently obtained publication. 

Mr. Bowell expressed the opinion that the effect of the proposed convention would 
e that Newfoundland would have a monopoly of the American market at the expense 
f Canada. At present Canada and Newfoundland were competing on equal terms, but 
nder the proposed convention, Newfoundland fish would enter the United States free, 
hile Canada continued to pay a heavy duty. He combattecl the statement that the 
hole of the fish trade of Newfoundland would be diverted to the United States. They 
■duld still supply other existing markets and have the advantage of free entry to the 
Fnited States for their surplus jDroducts, while Canadians would, be handicapped by a 
leavy tax. 

Mr. Harvey appealed to the Canadian delegates to consider whether they were jus- 
ified in preventing Newfoundland from availing herself of a market which was found 
o be open to her, simply because it was believed that Canada should participate. He 
miniated that each year's delay involved a loss to the people of Newfoundland of hun- 
of thousands of dollars. The loss to the traders would aggregate annually a very 
irge sum, while the fishermen would suffer to double the extent of the trader. 

Sir John Thompson stated that he considered the position to be thus : Canada and 
Newfoundland now share the American market. By the adoption of the convention, it 
proposed that Newfoundland should share it with the United States, and Canada be 
hut out. 

Sir John Thompson stated that, if it be agreeable to the Newfoundland delegates, 
e and his colleagues would, at the next session of the conference, submit a proposition 
writing with reference to the matters under discussion. 

Agreed to. 

LABRADOR BOUNDARY. 

^\ ith reference to the Labrador boundary, Mr. Bowell stated that, since the ques- 
ion had been last discussed, he had received a telegram from the privy council office of 
•ttaw a, stating that, although it had been recommended to Council that the map asked 
or by the government of Newfoundland should be transmitted, the recommendation 
tad not been approved, inasmuch as it was considered that the map was imperfect, and 
hat its formal transmission might therefore be misleading. 

41 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 189' 

Mr. Harvey expressed the opinion that the map referred to was a very satisfactoH 
one, except that he should insist that Melville Bay should be under the exclusive cu;! 
toms control of Newfoundland. 

Mr. Chapleau pointed out that the delimitation, as shown on the map referred t<| 
gave a considerable portion of the coast of Melville Bay to Canada, and that the contra 
of the coast would naturally involve the control of the waters adjacent thereto. 

Mr. Bowell called attention to the fact that, although the Hudson's Bay post ai 
North-west river might by this delimitation be located in the territory of Newfoundlanc. 
vet it was probable that a large portion of the goods landed there would be intended fd 
consumption on the Canadian side of the border. 

Sir John Thompson suggested that the Newfoundland government should appoiB 
a geographer to act jointly with the geographer of the department of the interior;! 
Ottawa in tracing up all available data, and to report the results of their examination t 
their respective governments. 

Sir John Thompson's suggestion was agreed to. 

PRIVILEGES TO UNITED STATES FISHERMEN. 

Sir William Whiteway called attention to a correspondence between the Hon. C. H 
Tapper and Sir James S. Winter, dated 2nd and 19th December, 1891, and 2nd an, 
9th January, 1892, published in the Canadian Blue-book, relative to an alleged permi 
sion on the part of the government of Newfoundland to United States fishermen to fig 
in Newfoundland waters, from which it would appear that Sir James Winter had ii. 
formed the Hon. Mr. Tupper that " Recent developments had furnished good reason f< 
concluding, not only that such permission has been granted, but that it has been doi 
in such a way as to assist the Americans in defrauding their own revenue, in workin 
injustice (or at least inequality) as between Americans themselves, and an injury ij 
our fishermen." 

Sir William Whiteway desired to say that such statement was entirely incorrect. ' 

MODUS VIVENDI LICENSE FEES. 

Mr. Chapleau called the attention of Sir William Whiteway to the fact thathewjj 
mistaken in supposing that the request for a statement of the amount collected fd 
license fees had not been made to the Newfoundland government. 

Among the published despatches was the following : — 

" 16th October, 1888. 
" Bon. M. Fbnelon, Colonial Secretary, St. John's, Nnd. 

•• Please send me list of modus vivendi licenses issued to date, and say what prj 
portion of the total United States fishing vessels visiting Newfoundland took license, 1 

"C. H. TUPPER, 
" Minister of Marine and Fisheries. ' 

Mr. Bond submitted a statement of the license fees collected by Newfoundlai 
under tin- modus vivt ndi arrangement, as follows : — 

In L888, the collections from American tishing vessels amounted to $8,089.50. 

In L889 collections from American fishing vessels amounted to $6,740.75. 

A.a bo i li«' collections in L890, he explained that the books of the department, co 
taining the requisite details, had been destroyed in the recent fire, and that he a\ 
therefore unable t<> give the exact amount collected from American fishing vessels. Tl 
blue book, however, showed that the aggregate collections for licenses granted to Frenc 
Canadian and American tishing vessels during 1890 amounted to $20,912.99. 

Sir William Whiteway was under the impression that he had in his office the infcj 
tnation uecessary t" complete the statement, his recollection being that he obtained 
from the customs department previous to. the fire. 

42 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

It was agreed that the statements as to the collections made by each country for 

tecs should be officially transmitted to the other, and that the aggregate should 
divided equally. 

PISH INSPECTION. 

Sir .John Thompson inquired whether Newfoundland intended to improve her 

of fish inspection. 
Sir William Whiteway explained that their statute on the subject was based on the 
' oadian act ; that for some time previous to his assuming office in 1889 the act had 
en enforced, he understood, by his predecessors, but that his government had 
a ted an inspector, and taken the necessary steps to enforce the law rigidly. 
Conference adjourned until Saturday, at 1 1 o'clock. 

W. V. WHITEWAY, Cha irman. M. BOWELL, 
R. BOND, J. A. CHAPLEAU, 

A. W. HARVEY, JOHN S. D. THOMPSON. 

DOUGLAS STEWART, Secretary. 



Halifax, 12th November, 1892. 
Conference resumed at 3 o'clock (no morning session). 

TREATMENT OF FISHERMEN. 

Mr. Bowell asked leave to file a statement with reference to the treatment accorded 

uadian fishermen by Newfoundland as compared with the treatment of Newfoundland 

bermen by Canada. He explained that he did not desire to submit this as a grievance, 

much as by way of illustration of the liberality accorded to Newfoundland fishermen 

the government of Canada. 

Leave having been granted he submitted the following memo. : 

Canadian Treatment of Newfoundland Newfoundland Treatment of Canadian 

Fishermen. Fishermen . 

.Newfoundland fishermen were accorded full 1 & 2. They were compelled to pay license fees of 

vileges of the inshore fisheries concurrently with $1 per ton, and give bonds before they were allowed 

nadians. to procure bait to carry on their fishing operations: 

No restrictions whatever were placed upon their (minute of council, 24th April, 1890) and subse- 

rations. quently they were refused bait under any circum- 

i They were exempt from light dues. stances, being refused licenses under the Bait Act 

I They were exempt from harbour dues. (instructions, 1891). They were prevented from 

They were exempt from pilotage dues. catching or purchasing bait. And finally, by a strict 

were afforded all port privileges. interpretation of the term "bait fishes," their traffic 

". Canada built and maintained free of all charges in frozen herring for commercial purposes was en- 

on shipping, lights and fog signals on the coast of tirely stopped. (Case " Ocean Belle/' 

wfoundland. 3. They were compelled to pay light dues. (Min- 

Canada did not exact similar duties. utes of council, 29th May, 1890.) 

l."'< [id Newfoundlanders annually operate on the 4. They were compelled to pay harbour dues. 

Canadian Labrador without restrictions. (Minutes of council, 29th May, 1890.) 

'mniamler Wakeham, 15th February, 1892.) 5. They were compelled to pay pilotage dues. 

(Minutes of council, 29th May, 1890.) 

6. Fishing vessels were entirely excluded from any 
privileges. 

7. Newfoundland imposed light dues on Canadian 
vessels for the lights which had been built and main- 
tained by Canada. (Memo, by Commander Wake- 
ham, 9th Nov., 1892, and report 15th Feb., 1892.) 

8. On the coast of Labrador, Newfoundland ex- 
acted duties from Canadians on barrels and salt used 
for their fishing operations, and, in many instances, 
where the articles were not used through failure of 
catch, duty was, the following year, levied on the 
same articles. (Quebec board of trade, 30th Octo- 
ber, 1889.) 

9. 112 Canadians in nine vessels fished on New- 
foundland Labrador, 1891. 

43 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 181 



Mr. Bowell said he thought it well to call the attention of the Newfoundland d 



un- 



gates to the comparison shown by No. 7 of the precis just submitted, inasmuch 
seemed rather extraordinary that the Newfoundland government should impose lis 
dues on Canadian vessels for lights on their coast which had been erected and wc 
maintained by Canada. In elaboration of this he begged to submit the followi 
extracts from reports made to the department of fisheries by Commander Wakeham 
the Canadian fisheries protection service. 

The first extract is from a report dated loth February, 1892, as follows : — 

" These vessels had to pay duty on passing the line at Blanc Sablon on the sj 
and barrels which they had on board for curing their fish. I called on the Newfoui 
land collector at Blanc Sablon, and he informed me that his orders were to collect dut 
as usual on all salt and barrels on all Canadian fishing vessels passing to the eastwa; 
For at least ten years back some of our vessels have had to pay these duties. At c 
time they even made our vessels pay light dues, though all the lights on the west co; 
and on both sides of the straits were built and are maintained by your department." 

The second extract is a memorandum dated 9th November, 1892, as follows : — 

" The lights in the straits of Belle Isle and at Rich Point and Cape Ray, on t 
wesi coast of Newfoundland were built and are maintained by Canada. It is a n 
that Canadian fishing vessels were compelled to pay light dues. I, myself, crossed 
' La Canadienne ' to Flowers Cove, and complained to the collector of customs at tl 
port of this practice, which was eventually given up. The government of Newfoui 
land maintains no light on the coast in question (French shore)." 

Mr. Bowell said that, in submitting this data, he did so with a view to elicit fr< 
the Newfoundland delegates any explanations or comments which they might desire 
make, in order that it might go upon the records before the conference concluded. 

Mr. Harvey explained that as regards light dues, the system was universa 
applied by Newfoundland, being applicable to their own vessels as well as to all othe 
He referred to the fact that Newfoundland was peculiarly situated on the line of c<\| 
merce between Canada and Europe, and that her extensive coast made it necessary tl 
she should, for the benefit of commerce generally, maintain an efficient light servi 
The great cost of erection and maintenance of these lights made it necessary that tj 
system of light dues should be maintained and continued. While it was true that th 
lights were necessary for the protection of Newfoundland commerce, it was equally til 
that the benefits accruing to Canadian commerce were ten times greater. He point 
out that the lights erected and maintained on the Newfoundland coast by the Canadii 
government were on a portion of the coast little frequented by Newfoundland vess<| 
and were essentially beneficial to Canadian vessels. He deemed it impracticable 
adopl any system by which exceptional treatment might be afforded Canadian vess 
in the vicinity of Canadian lights, inasmuch as vessels in paying dues contributed to 
general fund for the support of lights on the whole coast, and no system could 
(lc\ ised or successfully operated on any other principle. 

Mr. Bowell had no doubt that the explanation of Mr. Harvey was correct, as to ' 
causes which led to the exaction from Canadian vessels of lighthouse dues. Still, it M 
a question which should receive the attention and consideration of the Newfoundlaj 
governmenl with a view to relieving such vessels of the tax. 

UNION. 

Mi. Bowell would, with the consent of the conference (though the subject had 
been specially relegated to them by the government of Canada), ask the attention 
the delegates presenl to the greater question involved in the project of the entrance 
Newfoundland into the Dominion as a province of Canada. In applying the tt 
" greater question," he did so advisedly, believing that union was the true solution 
all the questions and difficulties which had been brought before this conference. 
was aware of the diversity of opinion which existed both in Canada and in Ncwfou 
land, as to the practicability and desirability of such a union, but he believed that 
great prosperity and success which British North America had achieved under confedt; 

44 



Newfoundland and ( Janada. 

i. would he enhanced to a still greater decree by the unity of action, increased powe r 
stige which would result from a union of all the British North American pro- 
Bees. He referred to the vexed questions which the conference had been discussing 

in U the past few days, all of which, he submitted, would disappear as a shadow if the 
(Countries resolved to unite their interests and adopt uniform legislation which would 
I in the interests of all concerned. 

It might he said that this solution, although desirable, was not one for presejnt 

ration, but he submitted that it was the general belief in both count lies that such 

I nion must sooner or later be consummated. He admitted the diversity of opinion as 

i- immediate completion, but he felt satisfied that he voiced public feeling in Canada 

^tatinu that the matter was only one of time, without any doubt as to what the result 

Juki he. 

The question was one which concerned not only the contracting parties, but was, in 
I ..pinion, of the greatest possible moment to the imperial government. The friction 
J ich had existed between Canada and Newfoundland, from time to time, and which 
med almost inevitable to countries competing for the same markets in products nearly 
Intical, led to protests and counter-protests which formed the most vexed questions 
J:h which the colonial office had to deal. He considered the union of the British 
jirth American dependencies not only of vital importance to the peace and welfare of 
■ people of Canada and Newfoundland, but to a great extent an imperial necessity. 

There were many reasons why Canada should treat .this subject favourably, and he 

night that there were reasons still greater why it should meet with the approval of 

iwfoundland, as the advantages to be derived equally by both were of themselves of 

amount importance. The united action consequent upon such a union would enable 

eat with the United States more advantageously, while the greater Canada which 

juld then be established must necessarily command greater respect, both from the 

Iperial government and other governments with which it might have to deal, commer- 

lly or otherwise. He would ask the delegates to consider for a moment the more 

e, and less expensive, protective service which would be afforded to the fisheries 

both countries if present misunderstandings and competition were removed ; and he 

Iced the Newfoundland delegates to consider whether as an important portion of Canada, 

y would not feel greater strength and confidence in facing the vexed question of 

French rights on their shores. 

As to whether this question should be considered by this conference, was a matter 

the delegates to say. For his part, he could not allow the opportunity to pass with- 

t bringing it to their attention, and expressing the hope that ere long the British 

pendencies on this continent which, but a few years ago, were scattered and isolated, 

I which by degrees had been growing more closely together, would become a happy, 

osperous and united power. He did not propose that they should enter into a 

nsideration of the minute details of the terms of union at the present conference. 

pat might be made a subject for future negotiations, should they agree to bring the 

bject under the notice of their respective governments for action. In the meantime, 

!■ believed the present meeting to be a fitting opportunity to consider the subject in a 

endly way. It was of sufficient importance to occupy the minds of the best men in 

th Canada and Newfoundland, and should not, therefore, be lost sight of when 

•ling questions materially affecting the interests of both countries. 

Sir William Whiteway was glad that the subject had been mentioned. It was not 

e of those relegated to the Newfoundland delegates as a part of their mission, but he 

w no reason why the representatives of the two countries stiould not discuss the 

fficulties and advantages which would accrue to • British North America by the com- 

etion of the union. His views, personally, on this question were well known. He 

(1 always been in favour of confederation, and viewed it as entirely one of terms. If 

w ere considered improper to formally discuss the matter he could see no harm in the 

.est ion being considered informally, with a view to bringing out the views of the 

legates representing the two governments. 

Mr. Harvey strongly objected to the question being brought before the conference 
ifore the decision of matters, especially referred to it, had been concluded. He said 

45 



.1 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 18! 

that the Newfoundland delegates were here with definite instructions to discuss cert; 
questions and that the union of the two countries was not among those questions. I 
union was the ultimate destiny of Newfoundland, as many believed, he was o^_ 
impression that it would not be a practical question for many years to come. In otl 
words, confederation was a question of the future : the delegates were here to deal wi 
present issues. The questions which they had come here to discuss were matters deej 
affecting the present interests of the island, and he thought it would be a great mista 
to take up the moot question of a union, at least before definite decisions had be 
come to as to what could, or could not, be done regarding those questions which h 
been relegated for the consideration of the conference. 

►Sir John Thompson said that in so far as the Canadian delegates were concern 
they were here to discuss any questions pending between the two countries. It h 
been suggested in the press of Canada, and he thought that it was generally unders 
by the public, that union would form one of the questions for the consideration of 
conference. He could not conceive any reason why it should not be dealt with 
solution of all pending difficulties, and in his opinion no more pertinent question co 
possibly engage the attention of the conference. As to the subjects which should 
considered at this meeting, the Canadian delegates had no intimation that the questi 
of the Bond-Blaine convention, which had absorbed such a large portion of the time 
the conference, was one which would come up, any more than this question. He 
not object to the consideration of the convention, however, and did not wish it to 
supposed that the reference to union had been made in order to evade a conclusion 
any other question. 

In like manner he could not conceive why Mr. Harvey should object to t 
discussion of a question which involved such great interests when considered 
connection with the future of British North America. 

Mr. Chapleau thought that the question of union might be of paramount impoi 
ance, and that even admitting Mr. Harvey's statement that the instructions tot 
Newfoundland delegates did not include this matter specifically, yet he could concei 
the question coming before the conference as a solution of the questions directly und 
discussion. In that connection he would ask Sir William Whiteway whether t 
imperial government had lately shown any disposition to settle the French sho 
difficulty, which he conceived to be the greatest difficulty in the way of considering t 
question of union. 

Sir William Whiteway thought that the imperial government had every dispositk 
to arrange an amicable solution of the dispute, but that the French government had n 
*-\ idenced such a disposition in that direction as he would desire. The question involv 
not only the French rights on the coast, but also the more aggravating fact that tl 
French and others used St. Pierre and Miquelon as a basis of operations for smugglii 
and fishing, and not as a place of shelter only for French vessels fishing on the Banks. 

PROPOSAL "A." 

Mr. Bowellj on behalf of the Canadian delegates, handed in a formal proposal, (, 
Appendix 5.) 

Conference adjourned until Monday, at 3 o'clock. 

W. V. WHITEWAY, Clmirman. M. BOWELL, 

I! BOND, J. A. CHAPLEAU, 

A W. HARVEY, JOHN S. D. THOMPSO 

DOUGLAS STEWART, Secretary, 



Conference resumed at :\ o'clock. Halifax, 14th November, 1892. 

PROPOSAL " B." 

Sir William Whiteway, on in-half of the Newfoundland delegates, handed 
counter proposal " B." (Set Appendix G.) 

proposal "c." 
air. Bowell, on behalf of the Canadian delegates, handed in counter-proposal 

'>" Appendix 7.) 

46 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

LIGHTH01 8ES. 

Mi-. Bond handed in a statement showing the amount paid by Newfoundland for 
e maintenance of lights for year 1892, as follows: — 

Newfoundland Lights. 

Estimate for Maintenance for the year 1892. 

Gull Island, Cape John $1,840 

Long Point, Twillingate 1,250 

Twillingate Wharf Light 120 

Cann Island, Seldom-come-by 700 

Offer Wadham Island 3,400 

Penguin Island 800 

Cabot Island, Bonavista Bay 1,500 

Puffin Island, Greenspond 900 

Little Denier 800 

Cape Bonavista 2,000 

Green Island, Catalina 2,000 

Fort Point, Trinity 220 

Hants Harbour, Trinity Bay 220 

Baccalieu Island ' 3,900 

Carbonear Island 800 

Harbour Grace Island 1,450 

Harbour Grace Beacon • 450 

Bay Roberts (Green) Point 230 

Brigus, North Head 650 

Cape St. Francis 3,500 

Fort Amherst 1,800 

St. John's Leading Lights 300 

Cape Spear 2,700 

Ferryland Head 1,700 

Buoy, Powles' Trepassey 300 

Cape Pine 2,000 

Point La Haye, St. Mary's 250 

Cape St. Mary's 2,100 

Point Verde, Placentia 750 

Dodding Head, Burin 1,500 

Allan Island, Lamaline 250 

Grand Bank 200 

Brunette Island, Fortune Bay 1,650 

Garnish, Fortune Bay 200 

Belloram, Fortune Bay 300 

Rocky Point, Harbour Breton 220 

Pass Island, Hermitage Bay 850 

Gaultois, Hermitage Bay 220 

Boar Island, Burgeo 700 

Ireland Island, La Poile Bay 800 

Rose Blanche Point 800 

Channel Head, Port au Basque 650 

Sandy Point, Bay St. George 400 

Mechanician, salary and travelling expenses 900 

Contingencies 400 

Alteration in lamps (seal to kerosene oil) 2,000 

850,670 

RICHARD H. O'DWYER, 

Receiver-General. 

47 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 20d tQ 20f/ 



A. 1895 



LICENSE FEES. 



Mr. Bond also handed in the following return of Canadian vessels which had been 
supplied with licenses to take bait during 1890, and desired to say that the receiver- 
general had intimated to him that owing to the customs books being destroyed in the 
late fire he could not vouch for the absolute correctness of the returns : — 



Return of Canadian Vessels which have been supplied with licenses to take bait, 1890. 



Place. 



Cape Broyle 

Burin 

Trepassey 

Sandy Point 

Channel 

Rose Blanche . . 

St. Jacques 

Belloram 

St. Mary's 

St. Lawrence. . . . 
Heart's Content. 
Portugal Cove. , 

Placentia 

Carbon ear 

Holyrood 

Ferry land. ... . 



123 



Number 




Number 


of 


Tonnage. 


of 


Vessels. 




Crew. 


31 


3,128 


552 


2 


240 


38 


• 8 


778 


128 


4 


399 


59 


1 


95 


12 


1 


18 


4 


9 


889 


160 


11 


1,091 


184 


2 


547 


35 


3 


287 


53 


1 


98 


16 


3 


346 


52 


4 


410 


64 


31 


2,979 


506 


8 


733 


136 


4 


391 


66 



12,429 



2,065 



Number of 

Visits 

made during 

season. 



239 



MODUS VIVENDI LICENSE FEES. 

Mr. Bowell handed in the following memorandum with regard to the modus 
vivendi license fees, and stated that he did so in order that the precise facts, so far as 
the action of Canada is concerned, might appear on the records of the proceedings of 
this conference : 

MEMORANDUM. 



The mutual recognition of licenses issued to the United States fishing vessels by 
the respective governments of Newfoundland and Canada was recommended, as well asj 
;m equal division of the fees respectively collected. 

The government of Newfoundland suggested that all annual licenses should expire 
on the 31st December in each year. 

Canada agreed to the suggestion of the Newfoundland government, and the gov- 
ernor ot' Newfoundland acquainted the governor-general of Canada that his govern-; 
iinnt would recognize the validity of all Canadian licenses. (Minute of council, 15th 
Sept., L888.) 

\ the information of the issue of licenses reached the department of fisheries,! 
copies of the licenses were forwarded to the colonial secretary of Newfoundland, and a 
request was made that, a list of licenses issued by Newfoundland should be furnished 
in ret urn. 

The fisheries department continued sending this information to the Newfoundland 
government well on into tl*> season of 1889, but the request for reciprocal information 
not having been complied with, the practice was discontinued. 

The minister of marine and fisheries oh the 16th October, 1$88, telegraphed the 
colonial secretary of Newfoundland in the following words : — 

48 



Newfoundland and ( Janada. 



" Please send me list of modus vivendi Licenses issued bo date and say wlmi pro 
portion of total United States fishing vessels visiting Newfoundland book licen i 

This request has not yet been complied with. 

Finally, in 1891, the high commissioner for Canada cabled the minister of marine 
and fisheries to ask Sir .lames Winter for the number of such lie. -uses Issued for 
different years. 

The following reply was received: — 

" Unable to procure information you ask immediately. Go vernment forbid officials 
furnish.' 5 

The modus vivendi licenses issued by the Canadian government were as follows : — 



Fear. 


No. of Vessels. 


Tonnage. 


Fees collected. 






36 

78 

119 

98 


2,554 
6,393 
9,641 

7,399 


$ cts. 
3,831 00 




ISS'.I 

1890 


9,589 50 

14,4(51 50 


i^.'l 




11,098 50 



The reciprocal issue of licenses by Newfoundland, however, continued only during 
the years 1888 and 1889. 

In 1890, Newfoundland exacted from Canadian fishing vessels license fees, the 
total amount of which is only known to that government, but the department of 
marine and fisheries is in possession of detailed information that fees were paid by 
US Canadian fishing vessels aggregating $5,780.38. Other vessels are known to have 
paid similar fees but definite information is not yet available. 

REFUND OF FEES. 



Sir William Whiteway drew attention to the subject of the suits now pending in 
the courts of Newfoundland, to enforce a refund of the license fees paid by Canadian 
vessels. He said that while it was intimated in the formal proposal of the Canadian 
government (" C ") that that government had not power to withdraw these suits, it 
seemed to be clearly shown in the despatches published that these suits were completely 
under their control, either as regards prosecution, suspension or withdrawal. From 
reports and letters of the minister of marine, it appeared that these claims were 
collected by the Canadian Government through the medium of a public notice. He 
would beg to call attention to the following : — 

" Department of Fisheries, 

"Ottawa, 22nd January, 1892. 
" The Collector of Customs at . 

"Sir, — The honourable the minister of marine and fisheries being advised that 
the exaction by the Newfoundland government from Canadian fishermen, of fees for 
licenses to purchase bait during the year 1890 was illegal, intends to take steps to 
er them for the fishermen. • 

11 1 inclose you herewith a supply of forms which are to be filled up with the neces- 
sary information to enable action for recovery of the fees. 

"You will please distribute these forms among any parties, who to your knowledge 
nay have paid such fees, or to deliver to parties applying to you for them in accordance 
with the notice published in the newspapers. 

" I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

" S. P. BAUSET, 
"Acting Deputy- Minister of Fisheries.''' 
49 
20tf,e,/-4 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. 1893 

"NOTICE TO BANK FISHERMEN. 

" Department of Fisheries, 

" Ottawa, 25th January, 1892. 

" The undersigned has been advised that the exaction of license fees from Canadian) 
fishermen by the government of Newfoundland during the fishing season of 1890 was, 
illegal, and he intends to take such proceedings as are available to obtain redress on i 
their behalf. For this purpose he respectfully requests that the owners or masters of 
all fishing vessels from whom license fees have been collected would place themselves in 
immediate communication with the nearest collector of customs and give him such full) 
particulars of the matter as they can. 

" CHARLES H. TUPPER, 
" Minister of Marine and Fisheries." 



" Ottawa, 27th January, 1892. 

" Sir, — I herewith send you a form for the purpose of obtaining a statement of the 
amount of the fees, etc., you paid to the Newfoundland government during the year 
1890, for licenses to purchase bait, &c, for your fishing vessel, and I have to request you 
to be good enough to fill up this form and sign the authority printed on the back of the 
same. 

" The honourable the minister of marine and fisheries being advised that the 
exaction of fees in question was illegal, intends to take steps to recover them back for 
the fishermen. 

" I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

"S. P. BAUSET, 
" Acting Deputy-Minister of Fisheries." 



It was, therefore, evident that the suits were not in consequence of the complaint* 
of the fishermen, but as a result of the invitation issued by the department. 

Sir John Thompson explained that the government held themselves responsible foi 
the procedure. Very great pressure had been brought to bear upon the government h\ 
the injured fishermen (as would appear by reference to the documents now on the table) 
both through the medium of direct communication, repeated telegrams, and the indirect 
pressure brought to bear through the members for their respective constituencies 
While Sir William Whiteway was quite correct in his statement that the Dominioi 
government had complete control of the suits now pending, it was equally correct thai 
the withdrawal of these suits would not cancel the individual right of the injured fisher 
imii i<. inter suits on their own behalf. 

Mr. Ohapleau, in support of the remarks of Sir John Thompson, quoted from th( 
report of Lieut. Gordon, of the 3rd December, 1890, asking that the government oi 
( !anada should take up the case of the fishermen, in the following words : — 

"The man is only a poor fisherman, and is not able to take the necessary legp 
steps to defend his own rights or recover damages, and as he apparently endeavoured it 
every particular to comply with the local laws, his case is one which, I think, the gov 
eminent may fairly take up in the general interests of our fishermen, for this is not ai 
isolated case, and there is a \w\ strong feeling among the fishermen on our coasts tha 
Newfoundlanders have every privilege <>n our shores, whilst, when they visit Newfound 
land, they are regarded as foreigners and treated in a directly hostile manner." 

Ee ;il-" quoted an opinion expressed by the council of the Montreal board ol 
t rade, as follows ; — 

"That the council is of opinion that all retaliatory legislation against Newfound 
Land should be withdrawn and that diplomacy should be trusted to arrange other matter 
in dispute, and further, that the government should be sustained in its opposition to I 

50 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

giving rights and privileges to a foreign power on this continent in the British 
forth American inshore fisheries, which jointly with Newfoundland belong to the 

i, .million of Canada by birthright and immemorial usage." 

The Halifax board of* trade had adopted the following resolution on the subject : — 

" That whereas the Halifax board <>f trade is deeply sensible of the grave injury 
. trade that results from the hostile legislative enactment between the governments of 
Newfoundland and Canada, and of the great loss and inconvenience that arc inflicted 0E 
..tli countries by the present position of affairs, be it resolved: (1.) That the Halifax 
card of trade urge upon the government of Canada by special memorial the desirability 
I arranging, if possible, a modus vivendi under the terms of which the hostile tariffs and 
nactments of both countries should be held in abeyance until sufficient time is given to 
nahle diplomatic conferences to adjust the whole difficulty. 

(2.) " That the Halifax board of trade is of opinion that the Bond convention 
etween the governments of Newfoundland and the United States would affect Cana- 
ian fishing interests most injuriously, in that the produce of the Canadian fisheries 
ould compete in the American markets with the produce of the Newfoundland fisheries 
t an enormous disadvantage, represented by the severe duties exacted from produce of 
lanadian fisheries, from which the produce of Newfoundland fisheries would be exempt. 
V.nd that the Halifax board of trade deem it desirable that the Canadian government 
lould use every effort to prevent the Bond convention from being carried into effect. 

(3.) " That the Halifax board of trade should also memorialize the Canadian 
»\ eminent to urge on the Newfoundland government the withdrawal of the Bait Act 
lirected against Canadian fishing vessels, on the grounds that its enforcement is a viola- 
ion of the pledge given by the government of Newfoundland ; is opposed to the comity 
hat should exist between colonies under the British flag ; and is not a fair return for 
lie port privileges which Newfoundland fishing vessels enjoy without restriction on the 
lanadian and Labrador coasts and their free admission to Canada's inshore fisheries." 

Mr. Bowell stated that the grievance connected with the imposition of these license 

as intensified by the discrimination in favour of American vessels. He quoted 

com the Royal Gazette of Newfoundland a proclamation over the signature of the 

olonial secretary, containing instructions for magistrates, customs officers, etc., in 

elation to the Bait Act, of which the following is an extract : — 

u No license shall be granted except to Newfoundland and United States fishing 

Is, and before granting such license the customs officer or magistrate shall require 
have produced to him the ship's register, in the case of Newfoundland vessels, and in 
he ease of United States vessels the clearance papers from the American customs." 

Mr. Bond explained that in treating American vessels thus considerately they felt 

hat they were treating with a friendly power, who had expressed a willingness to grant 

hem certain concessions pending the ratification of the convention, which was in abey- 

ute through no fault of the American government, and considered it unwise to impose 

i tax on American vessels. 

Mr. Bowell replied that it was very much to be regretted that the government of 
Newfoundland should have looked upon Canada (composed as it is of British provinces) 
is an unfriendly power, which was the only inference that could be drawn from the 
remark which had fallen from Mr. Bond. On behalf of the Canadian government he 
lesired to disclaim any feeling of hostility or unfriendliness towards Newfoundland. 
Dn the contrary, the desire of Canada was to maintain the most friendly relations, 
>oth eomercially and politically, with that colony, as was evidenced by the official papers 
iow before the conference. In regard to the remarks of Sir William Whiteway, he 
Mr. Bowell) could not understand why objection should be taken by the Newfoundland 
delegates to the proposal of the Canadian delegates to refer the question of the right on 
he part of the government of Newfoundland to collect license fees from the Canadian 
ishermen to a court of competent jurisdiction. If the Newfoundland government had 
the legal right to collect this tax why should it object to have that right affirmed by a 
ribunal competent to give a decision 1 If no such right existed it could scarcely be 
upposed that the government would desire to retain money illegally taken from Can- 

51 
2(M, e,/_4i 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. l$[\ 

adian fishermen. The question of testing in a court of law the rights of a subject again 
the crown was of constant occurrence, and if the Canadian fishermen had been illegalfl 
taxed by the Newfoundland government surely it was not asking too much that the* 
toilers on the sea should have the privilege at least of taking their case into court, i|( 
order to have their grievances redressed — if grievances really existed. To deny tli 
right would be anti-British, and he could not but express surprise at.the position takt 
upon this question by the Newfoundland delegates. If they were legally right, the 
had nothing to fear ; if wrong, the money taken from the fishermen as license fees wi 
illegally taken, and should be refunded. A goverment could not afford to be less coil 
siderate of the rights of a subject than would an individual in a private transaction, i 
which the right to property is involved, hence he hoped the Newfoundland delegate 
would reconsider the position they had assumed on this question. 

" OCEAN BELLE.'' 

Sir John Thompson suggested that it might be well to consider some of the clain: 
which had been brought to the attention of the cabinet for alleged ill-treatment < 
Canadian vessels by Newfoundland officers. He referred especially to the case of tl 
schooner " Ocean Belle," owned by John Allen & Sons, of Halifax. Captain Wraytoij 
the master of this schooner, filed a statement of which the following is an extract : — j 

"Left Halifax, N.S., 21st January, 1891, for Fortune Bay, Newfoundland, to pr«j 
cure a cargo of frozen herring ; arrived at St. Jacques on 29th following. Enterei 
vessel at custom-house, paid duties and received coastwise clearance from collects 
Clinton. Asked him for instructions and if any further papers were necessary for n 
to procure herring. He answered me : ' There is nothing to prevent you securing yoij 
load of frozen herring ; you can do so, so far as I am concerned. I have no instruction 
to the contrary. 

" Left St. Jacques on the 4th of February ; sailed to Belloram and other placd 
about the bay in search of herring, but secured none until the 16th of March, when w 
took on board 175 barrels. On the 20th March we took another lot of 60 barrels. A 
midnight on the 23rd of March we returned to Belloram. On the 25th purchased frotj 
one Patrick Farrell 260 barrels of fresh herring. Just as the purchase was conclude 
the steamer " Greyhound," employed by the government of Newfoundland, steamed int 
Belloram, with Philip Hubert, collector of customs at Harbour Breton, on board, wh 
at once sent a policeman on board my vessel and demanded the removal of the hatched: 
I protested against disturbing the hatches, the weather being soft, but finally had t 
comply with his demand. I was then asked to go on board the " Greyhound," wlic 
collector Hubert informed me I could take no more herring, at the same time fo 
bidding Farrell delivering me any of the lot I had secured from him, and placed a police 
man on board to prevent his doing so. 

u On the following morning (26th) collector Clinton arrived from Bay L'Ar 
(telegraph station) and I at once went with him on board the "Greyhound," whei 
consultation was held to decide what to do with the herring I had already on boan 
They decided to take a bond from me to land the fish at Halifax, N.S., at the sam 
time stating their instructions were to allow no Canadian vessels to secure fresh herrinj 
I asked them to put their refusal in writing. This they refused to do. 

• During the 26th, the wind changed to north-north-east, and the weather turne| 
intensely cold. Tried to secure herring again from Farrell, but policeman prevent. 
Iiim from handling t hem. 

" ( )n t lie morning of the 27th (the steamer " Fiona," also employed in the Newfoum 

land government service, and having on board commissioner Sullivan, not having arriv< 

pected) I sailed for the bay, the east. On the way down secured a lot of 25 barre 

of herring, spread them on ice for freezing, and engaged 250 barrels more from or 

Jeremiah Petit ; hadaboul LOO barrels in boats to spread on ice when steamer " Fiona; 

arrived and co lissioner Sullivan boarded my vessel, asking m e what I was doing her< 

Told him I w&b trying to freeze balance of my cargo if allowed to do so. He then askej 
me it collector Huberl had not forbidden me taking herring; I replied he had, but thfl 

52 



gw 



Newfoundland and ( Janada. 

• had r°fused to put his order in writing, or give or show his authority for the course 

was baking. Commissioner Sullivan then demanded the hatches removed, looked ;ii 

h and ordered the hatches replaced: at the same time forbidding me taking 

iother fish. 1 then demanded of him a written notice thai I should secure no herring. 

his he positively refused to give, and was some time in doubl whether he would allow 

6 bo take what herring I had already on hoard. Finally, I was allowed to take V( 

9 Jacques with the first catch of herring. Before leaving, Mr. Sullivan ordered the 

en in charge of the 100 barrels of herring to throw them overboard, which was done 

i the presence of myself and crew. The night following was intensely cold. 1 had 

ten to go on board the "Fiona," when I was compelled to take a most binding oath 

the herring I had on board would not be used for bait in Nova Scotia.'' 

" HATTIE." 

In this connection, 

Mr. Howell referred to the statement of Henry Dicks, owner of the schooner 
Hattie," of Charlottetown, from which it appeared that Mr. Dicks had taken out a 
shing bounty license under the provisions of a statute of Canada. 

He states : "That on the 5th day. of July he entered the port of Channel, New- 
►undland, reported at customs, paid the usual light dues, and made entry of fishing 
applies, consisting of 130 empty herring barrels and 4^ tons of salt. 

•■ That a duty was exacted from him on his supplies amounting to $16.70. 

" That upon protesting against the payment of such duty Mr. Dicks was detained 
Dur days, but in order to obtain a clearance to proceed to the fishing grounds he eventu- 
II v paid the duty, though the barrels and salt had not been landed. 

" That having cleared from the port of Channel on the 10th July, for coastwise 
ishing, having on board the aforesaid fishing supplies, usual stores, and a seine, preven- 
ive officer Richard Furneau, in the service of the Newfoundland government, came on 
K>ard (the 7th August) when he was seven miles from Burnt island, and seized his vessel 
or alleged violation of the law in hauling herring with a seine. 

"That he afterwards proceeded to Channel, and was granted a license on the 11th 
Vugust to continue fishing, on giving bonds for $2,000, that the fish were for food and 
exportation. 

"That having resumed charge of his vessel an officer again came onboard, and 
vould not allow the petitioner to resume fishing. Shortly after the petitioner discovered 
hat his seine had been ' tripped ' and that the herring were lost by the interference of 
he preventive officer. 

" That on the 13th August the petitioner paid $18, or $1 a ton to the customs 
>tficer, getting a receipt therefor ; but the seizing officer refused to allow the ship to go. 

" The petitioner was arrested and on the 20th August was tried for an infringement 
)f the Bait Act and a fine of $6 was imposed. The petitioner being unable to afford an 
ippeal, this fine was paid. 

"The herring season was then over, the crew had become demoralized, the petitioner 
iad sustained very serious loss, and being an ordinary fisherman, he was unable to seek 
•■dress for the interference which resulted in the loss of his fish from the seine, as well 
- that of the fishing season. He claims the sum of $2,000 damages." 

Mr. Bond stated, in connection with the cases referred to by Sir John Thompson 
md Mr. Bowell, that he did not, at the moment, remember the circumstances connected 
tfith them, nor the reasons which induced the Newfoundland government to consider 
heniselves justified in refusing to entertain them. In such matters the government 
»f course, guided by the reports of the officers intrusted with the enforcement of 
lie Bait Act, and on his return to Newfoundland he would be glad to look into the 
.natter. 

In reply to Sir John Thompson, he stated that the Newfoundland government 
^vould be quite willing to consider any renewed representations which might be forward- 
'd by the Canadian government, and would be glad to forward copies of any reports 
which may have formed the basis of the past action on the part of the Newfoundland 
government. 

53 



56 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 2of.) A. 189 

CUSTOMS EXACTIONS. 

Mr. Bowell called attention to a number of grievances which had been reported t* 
the Canadian government with reference to the practice said to prevail among Nev! 
foundland customs officials, of charging and collecting upon goods (in some cases even o 
salt and barrels) which had never been landed on Newfoundland territory. 

Mr. Chapleau said that Captain Wakeham of the fisheries protection service, ha] 
made a special report regarding these matters. In the report of the 15th February las! 
Captain Wakeham had called attention to the cases of the following, viz. : — 

" Garland " Petite Riviere. 

•• Magic " Lunenburg. 

" Vigesco " Halifax. 

" Valiant " LaHave. 

" Ella Maud " Shelburne. 

" Mayflower " , LaHave. 

" Vanilla " '. do 

" Bessie A." do 

" Jewel " Lunenburg. 

These vesels had to pay duty on passing the line at Blanc Sablon, on the salt an 
barrels which they had on board for curing and packing their fish. For many yeai 
Canadian fishermen having taken no fish, had to pay these duties on the same barrel 
and salt the following year. In this way the duty had sometimes been paid three timt 
on the same articles, although these articles were carried for fishing operations only- 
were not intended for trade and were never landed. 

Captain Wakeham had also reported that on the sedentary shore fisheries whei 
goods were landed and sold, Canada has, during the past two years, collected duties o 
dutiable articles, but the salt, nets, hooks and lines, etc., used in fishing operations wei 
admitted free. 

Sir William Whiteway stated that he had been informed that the practice of CO 
lecting duties upon goods which had not been landed was in vogue during the admini: 
tration of his immediate predecessors ; but on his assuming Office, the matter was brougb 
to the notice of the government, and orders were issued immediately to have it discor 
tinned, and customs officials were instructed not to collect duties on goods intended to b; 
used in carrying on the fishing when not landed. 

THE PROPOSALS. 

Adverting to the proposal and counter-proposals which had been formally submittec 
Mr. Harvey recapitulated the points at issue as he understood them, and state 
that in view of the fact that the Newfoundland delegates had agreed to guarantee t 
remedy the objections made by the Canadian government against the Bait Act, and th 
discrimination which they feared would be exacted by Newfoundland through the pr< 
visions of the Bond-Blaine convention, he expressed deep regret that the Canadian 
delegates had not, seen fit to adopt the counter-proposal (B) submitted by Sir Williar 

Whiteway. 

Mr. Bond pressed upon the Canadian delegates the advisability of consiclerin 
whether the counter proposal, jusl referred to by Mr. Harvey, should not be reconsidei 
ed with a \ tew O. its adoption if possible. 

.Mr. Chapleau said the Canadian delegates had assumed that the assurances give. 
by their Newfoundland colleagues, that the objections taken by Canada to the Bon< 
Blaine convention, as regards the Bait Act of Newfoundland, and the possibility of dif 
criminating against Canadian exports to Newfoundland under that convention, were r< 
moved by the concession to Canadian fishermen and vessels, of the same rights to proem 

i,ili '- as are c leded to Newfoundland fishermen, and under the same conditions an< 

'■ brictions, and thai no discriminations would be made against Canadian exports t 
Newfoundland, provided the Canadian government would undertake to have legislatioi 
enacted by the Canadian parliament, giving effect to the Newfoundland Bait Act, am 

54 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

Mpeventing violations of the same by Canadian fishermen and vessels, and provided also 
that the fishery products of Newfoundland, and the packages containing the same, would 
be admitted tree of duty into Canada, With that view, the Canadian delegates agreed 
thai such legislation would be recommended to the Canadian parliament, and thai the 
freedom of duty to Newfoundland fishery products, and the packages containing them, 
would be granted by Canada. 

The Canadian delegates further declared thatt they were ready to submit to their 
oolleagues of the cabinet at Ottawa, the reasons and arguments proffered by the New- 
foundland delegates tending to remove the objections made by Canada to the Bond 
Blaine convention on the ground that such convention would be greatly detrimental to 
the fishery interests of Canadian fishermen, and that they would do this with the view 
of bringing the relations of the two colonies to the most harmonious character consistent 
with the interests of both countries. 

The Canadian delegates, in furtherance of the mutual desire expressed by both 
parties to come to an amicable agreement and settlement regarding the difficulties now 
Boosting between the dominion of Canada and Newfoundland, asked that the modus vi- 
wndi between the two colonies be extended until the 1st August next, so as to allow the 
renewal of negotiations with the United States for the admission of Canadian fishery 
products into the American markets on terms satisfactory to Canada and Newfound- 
land. 

The Canadian delegates must express their deep regret that their offer has not found 
favour with the Newfoundland delegates, and that their sincere desire to bring about a 
friendly issue to the controversy between the two colonies has been frustrated by the 
persistent demand that a complete surrender of the rights of Canada to object to a con- 
vention which she thinks detrimental to her interests and to the general interests of the 
future union of all the British North American possessions should be stipulated by the 
Canadian delegates in recommending to their colleagues of the Canadian government to 
withdraw their protest against the Bond-Blaine convention, in the case of a refusal by 
the United States to grant to Canada the same, or adequate advantages as those which 
were stipulated in the Chamberlain-Bayard Treaty of 1888. 

UNION. 

Mr. Bowell expressed his regret that the delegates from Newfoundland had not 
seen their way clear to a friendly consideration of the much more important subject of 
union, which might be a solution of all the questions now agitating the two countries. 
It appeared, however, that Mr. Harvey had objections to even discuss the subject until 
all others in dispute had been settled. 

Sir John Thompson, reverting to the former discussion upon this subject, was still 
■trongly of opinion that, although the question of union might not be finally disposed of 
•at this conference, what had taken place should be made a part of the record. Though 
the subject of union was not specially mentioned in the order in council of Canada, it 
was understood that all matters affecting trade relations with Newfoundland might be 
discussed, and any proposition tending to a solution of the existing difficulties, not only 
might, but should be considered. He must, therefore, insist that what had been said 
should be recorded in the proceedings of the conference, otherwise there would not be a 
correct record of what had taken place. 

Mr. Harvey expressed himself strongly against any consideration of the question of 
union, until a definite answer had been given by the Canadian delegates with reference 
to the proposals now before the conference. He re-affirmed his statement made at a 
previous meeting, that the conference should first dispose of the questions which had 
been placed before it. He called attention to the origin of the conference, in the sug- 
gestion of Lord Knutsford, at the time when there was a cessation of trade and com- 
merce between the two colonies) that a conference should be arranged to consider the 
points in difference between the two governments, and that, pending the meeting of the 
conference, all hostile proceedings should cease. This was agreed to, the truce was pro- 
claimed, and this is the way the conference and the matters in "dispute should be, m his 

55 



LG Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) a. 1893 

opinion, brought to an agreement or a direct issue ; after which, if time permitted, he 
would be glad to listen to any expression of opinion which the Canadian delegates might 
desire to make, as to the terms upon which the union might, at some time in the future, 
take place. This union must be dependent on circumstances which may arise in the 
future. 

Mr. Bond quite concurred in the opinion of Mr. Harvey that it was of paramount 
importance that the questions directly relegated to the conference should be first dis- 
posed of. At the same time he could not conceive of any objection to consider any 
proposal submitted by the Canadian representatives as a solution of present difficulties. 
If Mr. Bowell seriously brought forward the question of union, he was quite prepared 
to hear what he had to say. He used the word seriously, advisedly, because on Satur- 
day, when the matter was first introduced by Mr. Bowell, it had been suggested that 
the discussion should not be recorded as part of the minutes of this conference, and he 
was of opinion that any proposal seriously made should form part of the records together 
with the opinion expressed thereon. He did not agree with his friend Mr. Harvey that 
the Newfoundland representatives had no authority or right to consider the question. 
He submitted that their duty was to consider all questions of difference between the 
two colonies, and proposals as to a solution of such differences, and he desired to refer 
to the minutes of council signed by his excellency the governor of Newfoundland 
(appendix 4), which was their authority so to do. 

Mr. Harvey again protested against the consideration of this question, until the 
conference should come to some decision upon the questions which had been relegated to 
it, and which had formed the subject of discussion during the past few days. 

Sir John Thompson, in reply to Mr. Harvey, said that the Canadian delegates 
could, of course, only discuss the questions which the Newfoundland delegates were 
willing to discuss, and must discuss them in the order desired by the Newfoundland 
delegates. He considered, however, that the question of union was one of the greatest 
pending between Canada and Newfoundland, and therefore within the authority of the 
delegates to discuss. In any case, he pressed that what had been said on this subject 
on Saturday and to-day should appear on the record, if any record of the discussion was 
intended to be preserved and made public. The expectation of the public in Canada 
was that the question of union would be brought forward, and if the delegates, on their 
return, should be asked whether that question was taken up, they could not be expected 
to deny the fact. If the record was silent on that subject, they would be obliged to 
contradict the record. 

Sir William Whiteway expressed the opinion that the consideration of the question 
of union, if proposed as a solution of existing difficulties, was a proper one for the con- 
sideration of the conference. 

Mr. Bowell said he could not help remarking, and he would do so, he hoped, not in 
;ni offensive manner, that Mr. Harvey had been conjuring up phantoms for the purpose 
of knocking them down, which he admitted had been very well done. It must be re- 
membered, that he (Mr. Bowell) had not even suggested delay in the settlement of the 
questions now before them for consideration. All that he had done was to ask the con- 
sideration of the greater question in a manner that might lead to a final settlement of 
all questions of dispute between them. 

Sir William Whiteway, on behalf of the Newfoundland delegates, handed in 
counter proposal " l>." (See appendix 8.) 

( lonference adjourned until Tuesday, at 3 o'clock. 

W. V. WHITEWAY, Chairman. M. BOWELL. 

I! BOND. J. A. CHAPLEAU. 

A W. HARVEY. JOHN S. D. THOMPSON. 

DOUGLAS STEWART, Secretary. 

Halifax, 15th November, 1892. 

Conference resinned al .'I o'clock, all the delegates being present. 
Mr. Bowel) handed in proposal "E." (See appendix 9.) 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

// was agreed that the delegates should recommend fco their respective governments 
the rate of postage between the two countries be reduced to three cents per ounce, 
that newspapers, when scut from the office of publication, be transmit ted free. 
It was moved by Mr. Bond, seconded by Mr. Chapleau, and 

Resolved, that the Canadian and Newfoundland delegates desire to record their 
appreciation of the kindness of the provincial government of Nova Scotia, in 
tag at their disposal the legislative council chamber, during their deliberations in 
t'.ix and that this expression of their gratification be conveyed to the said govern- 
t through the Hon. W. S. Fielding, premier. 

// was agreed that no statement of the business of the conference should be made 
ic until the delegates report to their respective governments. 
Conference concluded. 

YV. V. WHITEWAY, Chairman. M. BOWELL. 

R. BOND. J. A. CHAPLEAU. 

A. W. HARVEY. JOHN S. D. THOMPSON. 

DOUGLAS STEWART, Secretary. 



APPENDIX 1. 

I port of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by His "Excel- 
lency the Governor-General in Council on the 23rd September, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council have had before them a telegram from the 
istrator of the government of Newfoundland to your excellency, dated the 15th 
itember, 1892, hereto attached. 

The committee advise that your excellency be moved to inform the administrator 

telegraph, that a deputation from the Canadian government can meet a delegation 

m the government of Newfoundland at Halifax to discuss the fishery question 

I other questions between Newfoundland and the Dominion any time after the tenth 

of October next. 

The committee further advise that the government of Newfoundland be invited to 
ic a day subsequent to the 10th October, on which it would be convenient for their 
tes to meet a Canadian delegation. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



Administrator, Newfoundland, to Lord Stanley of Preston. 
im.) St. John's, Newfoundland, 15th September, 1892. 

ii requested by my responsible advisers to inquire of your lordship earliest 
psible date at which it will be convenient for a deputation of Canadian government 
I delegation from this colony to discuss fishery question and other questions 
lifference between the two governments. 

ADMINISTRATOR. 



APPENDIX 2. 

' of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by His Excel- 
lency the Governor-General in Council on the 23rd September, 1892. 

lhe committee of the privy council beg to recommend to your excellency that the 
er of militia and defence, the minister of customs, and the minister of marine and 
- be appointed a deputation to meet and confer with certain delegates from the 
ment of Newfoundland upon the fishery question and other questions between 
two governments. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 
57 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) A. m 

APPENDIX 3. 

Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by His Excelled 
the Governor-General in Council on the 29th October, 1892. 

The committee of the privy council beg to recommend to your excellency t 
the minister of justice be appointed a member of the deputation to meet and cor, 
with certain delegates from the government of Newfoundland upon the fishery quest! 
and other questions between the two governments, in the room of the minister 
marine and fisheries, who is obliged to proceed to England on official business. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



APPENDIX 4. 

Certified Copy of Minutes of the Honourable Executive Council, approved by m 
Excellency the Governor on the 27th October, 1892. 

On consideration of the question of a delegation to Halifax, Nova Scotia, to cow 
with delegates from the government of the dominion of Canada upon the questio: rf 
the fisheries and other matters of difference between the two governments, it in 
resolved that the Hon. Sir W. V. Whiteway, K. C. M. G., premier, the Hon. Roljrt 
Bond, colonial secretary, and the Hon. A. W. Harvey do proceed as delegates f p 
this colony to Halifax, on the 2nd proximo. 

T. O'BRIEN, Lieut-Col, 

Governor. • 



"A"— APPENDIX 5. 

The Canadian representatives, having stated their objections to the Bond-BL 
convention, and the representatives of Newfoundland, having assured the forrnei 
their desire to remove all such objections, in so far as it may be in the power of 
government and legislature of Newfoundland to do so, and having declared that 
ratification of that convention is a matter of the utmost importance to the colonfcl 
Newfoundland, the Canadian representatives desire to express their gratification at le 
assurance before mentioned. 

They are unable to state, without consultation with their colleagues of the cabM 
that the protest of Canada against the ratification of the convention would not be I 
tinned, even though it should be found impossible to secure for Canada admission 
Canadian fishery products to the markets of the United States, on terms like i 
granted to Newfoundland under the convention. 

The ( 'anadian representatives, therefore, suggest that, for the present, thatquesp 
be lefl in abeyance, and that in the meantime, an agreement be made as follows:— 

' hal lice majesty's government shall not be asked by Newfoundland to ratify 
convention until a reasonable time shall have elapsed to give Canada a further 0] 
t unity to ascertain whether the United States will consent to put the fishery pre' 
oi ( 'anada and <»t' Newfoundland on the same footing, or grant equivalent conces 
to ( anadian products. 

Thai it be understood to be the intention that Newfoundland will put Cana 

fisher ii and vessels on equal footing with Newfoundland fishermen and vessel- 

time to time a; to supplies of bait, and other matters, and that no discrimination 
be made against exports from Canada to Newfoundland. These two provisions t 
aecured at leasl tor the time during which the convention shall be in operation, 
should be ratified 

58 



Newfoundland and Canada. 

That, in the meantime, i.e., during the period allowed for negotiations on the pari 
Canada, the fishermen and vessels of Canada shall have bait and other farilit ies, on 
q same footing as those of Newfoundland, and that no duties shall be imposed in 
Lnada on the fishery products of Newfoundland in their fresh, salted, dried or cured 
ite, including fish oils, and no discriminating duties in Newfoundland on exports from 
mada. 

That Canada will adopt such legislation as may he within the competence of her 
rliamenl against infractions of the laws of Newfoundland respecting bait, by Canadian 
bermen and vessels who may obtain supplies of bait in Newfoundland. 



" B "—APPENDIX 6. 

The Newfoundland delegates, having carefully considered the paper submitted by 

madian delegates, regret that notwithstanding the fact that the Newfoundland 

tes have expressed their willingness to recommend to their government the 

emoval of the objections raised by Canada, viz., differential duties — access to bait — 

• • under 1818 treaty — to the Bond- Blaine convention, the Canadian delegates 

tesitate to undertake on behalf of their colleagues, the withdrawal of the protest, even 

t'ter time has been allowed for the conduct and termination of further negotiations with 

he United States on the part of Canada. 

If the Canadian delegates will, however, undertake to recommend to their colleagues 
be withdrawal of the protest under the foregoing circumstances, if the Canada-United 

- negotiations have not been concluded by 1st June, 1893, the Newfoundland 
lelegates will cordially assent to the proposal as submitted. 

In case this meets with the approval of the Canadian delegates, the reports to the 
respective governments should embrace provisions regarding the consulate at St. Pierre — 
ni agreement for the delimitation of Labrador boundary, and that the suits now being 
>rosecuted in the Newfoundland courts regarding license fees, should be withdrawn. 

The Newfoundland delegates would also suggest that the verbiage of the two first 
►aragraphs on the second page of the paper submitted, should read somewhat as 
ollows : — 

(1.) That it be understood to be the intention that Newfoundland shall put Cana- 
lian fishermen and vessels on the same footing, and that Canada shall put Newfoundland 
ishermen and vessels on the same footing as regards their respective fisheries as the 
espective fishermen and vessels were upon prior to the year 1890. That no discrimi- 

I union will be made by Canada or Newfoundland upon the exports from each of the 
olonies to the other, and that fishery products and packages containing the same shall 
be free upon entry into each colony from the other. These two provisions to be secured 
each colony during the operation of the convention, should it be ratified. 

(2.) That, in the meantime, i.e., during the period allowed for negotiations, the 
•revisions contained in the next last preceding paragraph shall be in operation between 
wo colonies. 



"C"— APPENDIX 7. 

The Canadian delegates beg to offer the following suggestion to the delegates from 
Newfoundland on the counter-proposal just handed in by the latter to the former. 

^ ithout discussing for the present the completeness of the statement of Canada's 
objections to the Bond-Blaine convention, but coming at once to the request that the 
panadian delegates shall recommend to their colleagues the withdrawal of the protest 
made by the Canadian government, they request the Newfoundland delegates to consider 
die efiects of such a promise. In negotiations like the present, which are ad referendum, 
* promise to recommend would be considered by the Canadian government as an obliga- 
tion assumed on their behalf by three of their colleagues, and that government would, 
in consequence, not consider themselves free to deal with the whole question on its 

5'J 



5G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20r.) A. 189-' 

merits. The Canadian delegates can, therefore, only undertake to submit the whol 
question to their colleagues, and to assure the delegates from Newfoundland that th 
representations that they have made will be considered by the Canadian governmen 
with an anxious desire that the relations of the two countries shall be of the most hai 
monious character, consistent with the interests of both countries. 

The Canadian representatives acquiesce in the proposal to make representations t 
her majesty's government with reference to a consulate at St. Pierre, and to delimi 
the Labrador boundary, whenever the Newfoundland government is prepared to do s 
— an examination of the question being in the meantime made by geographical experts 
As regards the suits now pending in the Newfoundland courts for the recovery « 
license fees, the Canadian government is hardly in a position to withdraw them. The 
are suits by and on behalf of persons who claim a refund of license fees, etc., an< 
action of the character suggested in the counter-proposal would not bind the claimant 
to surrender their rights. The Canadian government, however, would undertake, if i 
be considered desirable, to secure a suspension of these suits for the period referred t 
in the next following paragraph, as allowed for negotiations. They would prefer tha 
an agreement should be come to for a reference of the question of the liability of th 
Newfoundland government for claims of that class, to some legal tribunal, such as th 
judicial committee of the privy council, the supreme court of Canada, or the suprem 
court of Newfoundland ; with the right to appeal to the judicial committee if eithe 
of the two latter courts should be the court resorted to. 

They submit that the period allowed for the negotiations referred to in the pn 
posal and the counter-proposal should be the 1st of August next. 

In other respects, they respectfully invite the Newfoundland delegates to recoi 
sider the terms of the proposal made by the Canadian delegates at Saturday's meetim 



"D"— APPENDIX 8. 

The Canadian representatives having expressed their willingness to adopt sue 
Legislation as may be within the competence of their parliament, against infraction ( 
the laws of Newfoundland respecting bait by Canadian fishermen, and vessels who ma 
obtain supplies of bait in Newfoundland, the Newfoundland representatives undertak 
to recommend to their cabinet that Canadian fishermen and vessels shall be put 
equal footing with Newfoundland fishermen and vessels as to supplies of bait and tha 
no discrimination will be made against imports from Canada, provided all the produc 
of the Newfoundland fisheries and packages in which the same is contained shall h 
admitted to Canadian ports free of duty, and also that the fishermen of Newfoundlan 
are admitted to equal privileges with Canadian fishermen in Canadian waters ; th 
mutual concession to continue in force until the fist day of June next. Should th 
Bond-Blaine convention in the meantime receive the ratification of her majesty's go* 
ernment, or the Canadian government, on or before that date, withdraw their protes 
against the ratification of the same by her majesty's government, then the said priv 
lege shall continue to exist. The Newfoundland representatives had hoped that aft< 
the assurances given, viz., that such guarantee as the government of the Dominion < 
( 'anada Bhall deem satisfactory will be given by the government of Newfoundland tha 
no differentia] tariff will be exacted against the produce of the Dominion of Canada 
thai the Canadian fishermen will be admitted to equal rights and privileges with th 
fishermen of Newfoundland, and that a system of licenses shall be adopted as a reood 
nition of the continuity of the treaty of 1818; which meant the removal of evei 
objection within the powers of the colony to remove, the Canadian representative 
would have undertaken the withdrawal of the protest, or at least to recommend to the 
colleagues the withdrawal of the same after a reasonable time had been allowed ti 
afford Canada a further opportunity to ascertain whether the United States would ooi 
bo put the fishery products of Canada and of Newfoundland on the same footing 
or grant equivalent concessions to Canadian products. 

60 



Newfoundland and ( Janada. 

The Newfoundland delegates fail to sec thai in asking the Canadian representatives 

i these negotiations which are <ul referendum to recommend to their government the 

,'ithdrawal <>t* the protest, their freedom of action would he contracted or influenced !«'- 

>nd the expi-ession of an opinion by the Canadian representatives, and they regret thai 

nadian representatives decline to accede to their requesl in tins behalf. 

[n the absence of such an undertaking the Newfoundland delegates are unable to 
ive a promise to the effect that her majesty's government will nm be asked by the 
overnmenl of Newfoundland to ratify the convention aforesaid, more especially as such 
itification is considered to be of vital importance to the trade and commerce of the 
olony. 

The Newfoundland representatives presumed that in proposing the withdrawal of 
■if suits respecting the license fees, their request would not have been deemed unreason- 
ble, hut would have met with a ready acquiescence, and they fail to perceive any conces- 
ion on the part of the Canadian representatives in a proposal to refer the matter to a 
ndicial tribunal, which is the utmost that can be done under the most antagonistic cir- 
unistances. They would, therefore, most respectfully ask a reconsideration of this sub- 
eel by the Canadian representatives, a modification of their proposal. 



"E"— APPENDIX 9. 

The Canadian delegates will submit to their government the reply handed to them 
v the Newfoundland delegates last evening. 

In the meantime, however, they respectfully assert that the stipulations which that 
•ply designates as " mutual concessions " can hardly be regarded as such, for the fol- 
owing among other reasons : 

(1.) The right of Canadian fishermen to buy bait in Newfoundland on equal footing 

ith Newfoundland fishermen had already been secured, as a condition on which the 

'.ait Act received the royal assent, and the law officers of England have, it seems, 

idvised her majesty's government, that it is illegal for the government of Newfound- 

ind to adopt any other course. 

(2.) Equal rights of fishing in the waters of the two countries could not be regarded 
is a concession to Canada by Canadian fishermen. They are of opinion that the fish- 
>f Newfoundland waters are not so productive as to afford them lucrative employ- 
aent, while the fisheries in Canadian waters are far otherwise. The fishermen of Canada 
D using the deep sea fisheries (which are open to the world) desire to enjoy the right to 
»rocure bait in Newfoundland. The fisheries of Canada have always been open to New- 
oundland fishermen on the same terms as to Canadians. Both have always had the 
tine terms in the markets to which the produce of the fisheries was carried. If, how- 
sver, the convention between the United States and Newfoundland should give the 
Newfoundland fishermen a preference over Canadian fishermen in the markets of the 
1 oited States by stipulation for free fish for Newfoundland, while Canadian caught fish 
\'ould remain subject to duty, the disadvantage to Canadian fishermen would be seriously 
■nhanced if Newfoundland fishermen could pursue the fisheries in Canadian waters, 
anadian fish would then indeed have a free market, but only when caught by New- 
foundland fishermen. 

(3.) The offer that, in the event of Canada submitting to have the convention go 
into force, discriminating duties would not be imposed on her exports to Newfound- 
land, is merely an offer to do that which the government of that colony and the dele- 
gates have avowed their intention in making the convention. Canada has never imposed 
liscriminating duties on imports from Newfoundland, and although Newfoundland for a 
time did so against Canada, it has been assumed that she did so under a feeling of irri- 
tation and that a policy so contrary to the principles which should govern the relations 
between two dependencies of the empire would not be adhered to. 

As regards the desire and expectation of the Newfoundland delegates, that the 
-nits should be absolutely withdrawn, it must be remembered that these suits were 

61 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 20d to 20f.) 



A. 189; 



brought to recover sums of money which were obtained by the Newfoundland goven 
merit from persons in Canada, without (it is contended) the authority of the law. Tt 
Canadian delegates submit that the proposal for a reference of the controversy to soi 
-competent authority should be satisfactory, and that the Canadian government shoulj 
not be asked to pay their people the money which has thus been obtained by Newfouiu 
land. This would be the result of their undertaking to have the suits withdrawn, 
the individual claimants could not be expected to abandon their rights, and neither tl 
parliament nor government of Canada could take away those rights. 



62 



6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 25.) A. 1893 



RULES 



[25J 

)fthe Exchequer Court of Canada in respect to any proceeding that may be 
had or taken in the Exchequer Court of Canada to impeach any patent 
issued under " The Patent Act." 



GENEEAL OEDEE. 

In pursuance of the 55th section of " The Exchequer Court Act," 50-51 Victoria, 
hapter 16, and 52 Victoria, chapter 38, it is ordered that the following rules shall 
e in force in respect to any proceeding that may be had or taken in the exchequer 
ourt of Canada to impeach any patent issued under " The Patent. Act," and the 
mendments thereto: — 

1. In any proceeding for the impeachment of any patent under the 34th sec- 
ion of " The Patent Act," as amended by the act 53 Victoria, chapter 13, intituled 
; An Act to amend the Patent Act," the practice and procedure which in like pro- 
jeedings were in force in her majesty's high court of justice in England immediately 
irior to the passing of the act of the parliament of the united kingdom of Great 
jiritain and Ireland, 46 and 47 Victoria, chapter 57, intituled " An Act to amend 
jnd consolidate the Law relating to Patents for Invention, Eegistration of Designs 
nd Trade Marks," shall be followed as near as may be. 

2. In any such proceeding the party seeking to impeach the patent may, in ad- 
ition to any ground or cause for impeachment that might be relied on under the 
4th section of the said act, set up and rely upon any ground or cause mentioned 
b the 37th section of "The Patent Act," as amended by the act 55-56 Victoria, 
hapter 24, intituled " An Act to further amend the Patent Act." 

3. If in any case it is sought to impeach a patent for one or more of the grounds 
»r causes mentioned in section 37 of " The Patent Act," as amended by 55-56 Vic- 
oria, chapter 24, intituled "An Act to further amend the Patent Act," and for no 
•ther cause, a sealed and certified copy of the patent and of the petition, affidavit, 
pecification and drawings thereunto relating may be filed in the office of the regis- 
irar of the court, and proceedings to have the same declared null and void may 
hereupon be taken by information in the name of the attorney general of Canada, 
r by a statement of the claim at the suit of any person interested, in accordance 
rith the ordinary practice of the court. 

Dated at Ottawa, this 5th day of December, A.D. 1892. 

GEO. W. BTJEBIDGE, 

Judge ) Exchequer Court. 



Edarar versus Caron. 



K !<: 1 * O I J T 



ROYAL COMMISSION 



In reference to certain charges made agai 



HON. SIR A. P. CARON, K.C.M.G. 



SESSION, 1893 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT. 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE QUEEN'S MOST 
EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1893 



Edgar versus Caron. 



TABLIi OF CONTENTS 



Page. 
>rder in Counci], appointing Royal Commission 1 

!( unmission, cop} 7 of 2 

)rder in Council, remitting fees on Commissions 8 

" providing for payment of expenses 8 

iteport of Commissioners 10 



setter of Mr. Edgar to Commissioners 11 

from Crown Counsel to Mr. Edgar 16 

leply to above letter by Mr. Edgar 22 

'urther letter from Crown Counsel to Mr. Edgar 23 

■)ath of Judge Routhier as Commissioner 25 

Tait " 26 

Commission to Secretary, G. F. Hamel 26 

)ath of Secretary 26 

)aths of Stenographers 27 

Totice of appearance by J. S. Archibald 27 

Voces- verbal, minutes of proceedings 28 

List of witnesses examined 35 

List and inventory of exhibits produced and filed. 

Series " D." 36 

" "D.T." 39 

" "LI." 41 

" "J.S." 55 

" "H.J.B." , 57 

" "W.R.D." 58 

" " J.G." 59 

" " A.R.Mc." 59 

" "ARC." 59 

Evidence, M. G. Dickieson 61 

L. K.Jones 71 

J. G. Scott. 90 

H. J. Beemer 124 

W. R. Dean 153 

Appearance of Hon. Geo. Irvine for Mr. Beemer.. 160 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893J 

Pagi 
Evidence, Hon. Thos. McGreevy 16] 

" James Geggie ; 17i 

E. F. Wurtele id 

" A. R. McDonald 18, 

" P. E. Grandbois, M.P 19 

" J. J. McDonald 1 

" E. D. Bosweli 21: 

" P. B. Dumoulin 21' 

" Prank Ross. 21; 

u J. I. Tarte 21 



Sir A. P. Caron 


22 


Exhibits— Series " D." , 




"D.T." 


o. 


" "L.J." 


21 


" "J.S." 


44 


" "HJ.B." 


55 


" "W.R.D." 


57 


" "J.G." 


58 


" " A.R.Mc." « 


58 


" " A.P.C." 


58 


Subpoenas 


58 



IV 



Edgar versus ( Jaron. 



report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council 
on the 16th June, 1892. 

The Committee of the Privy Council, on the recommendation of the 
President of the Privy Council, advise that a Royal Commission under the 
Act, chapter 114 of the Revised Statutes, respecting inquiries concerning 
Public Matters be issued, directed to the Honourable Adolphe Basile Routhier 
f the city of Quebec, one of the Judges of the Superior Court, in and for 
the province of Quebec, and the Honourable Melbourne M. Tait, of the city 
of Montreal, also one of the Judges of the said Superior Court, authorizing 
such Commissioners to take evidence as to the truth or falsity of certain alle- 
gations and charges against the Honourable Sir Adolphe P. Caron, one of Her 
Majesty's Privy Councillors for Canada, and a member of the House of Com- 
mons of Canada, as set forth in a resolution adopted by the House of Com- 
mons on the fourth day of May, 1892, with powers to summon before them 
any witnesses and to require them to give evidence on oath, orally or in 
writing, or on solemn affirmation, if they are persons entitled to affirm in 
civil matters, and to produce such documents and things as such Commission- 
ers deem requisite to the full investigation of the matters into which they are 
appointed to examine. 

The Committee further advise on the same recommendation, that the 
sittings of the said Commission be held at such place as shall be found con- 
venient, and that the Commissioners report the evidence as well to Your Ex- 
cellency in Council as to the Speaker of the House of Commons. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



2?— 1 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 



Extract from The Canada Gazette of Saturday, August 6, 1892. 



COMMISSION. 

STANLEY of PRESTON. 

[L.S.] 

CANADA. 

VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c, &c., &c. 

To the Honourable Adolphe Basile Routhier, of the city of Quebec, one of 
the Judges of the Superior Court in and for the [province of Quebec, and 
the Honourable Melbourne M. Tait, of the city of Montreal, one of the 
Judges of the Superior Court in and for the province of Quebec, — 
Greeting ; 

ROBT. SEDGEWIOK, ^ \17 HERE AS it is, in and by the Revised Statutes 
Deputy of the Minister of V V? of Canada, chapter 114, intituled : "An Act 

Justice, Canada. J respecting Enquiries concerning public matters," 

among other things in effect enacted, that whenever the Governor in Council; 
deems it expedient to cause an enquiry to be made into and concerning any) 
matter connected with the good government of Canada, or the conduct of any| 
part of the public business thereof, and such enquiry is not regulated by any 
special Law, the Governor in Council may by the Commission in the case con- 
fer upon the Commissioners or persons by whom such enquiry is to be conducted, 
the power of summoning before them any witnesses, and of requiring them to 
give evidence on oath, orally or in writing, or on solemn affirmation, if they 
are persons entitled to affirm in civil matters, and to produce such documents 
and things as such Commissioners deem requisite to the full investigation of 
the matters into which they are appointed to examine : 

And whereas during the Session of Parliament which took place during 
the present year (1892) Mr. James D. Edgar, a member of the House of 
( Jomraons, made in his place in the House of Commons, on the sixth day of 
April last, certain statements against the Honourable Sir Adolphe P. Caron, 
K.< . \l.< 1., another member of the House, and a member of the Queen's Privy 
Council for Canada, which are set forth in the Votes and Proceedings and in 
t be Journals of the said House : 

A.ND whereas on a subsequent day the said James D. Edgar moved that 
the said statements be referred to the Select Standing Committee of the Housej 
of Commons on Privileges and Elections, and a debate arising thereon, as to 
the propriety and expediency of so referring the said statements, and on the 
meaning of the charges and imputations which were contained and implied in 
the same, the following resolution was come to by the House : — 

James D. Edgar, 1 lie member representing the Electoral District of the] 
West Riding of the County of Ontario in this House, having stated from his 
place in this House, that he is credibly informed and believes that he can 
establish by satisfactory evidence — 

2 



Edsrar versus ( !aron. 



'O 



1. That during each of the years 1882 to 1891 inclusive, the Quebec and 
Lake St. John Railway Company received by way of bonus from the Dominion 
>f Canada, subsidies amounting in the aggregate, to upwards of one million 
tollars, which subsidies were voted by Parliament on the recommendation of 
the Ministers of the Crown. 

2. Arrangements were entered into" by the said Railway Company where- 
by the expenditure of said subsidies was made by a Construction Company 
through, or in conjunction with, one H. J. Beemer, a contractor — and the said 
Beemer, and those who assisted him in financing for the said railway works, 

\od the benefit of the said subsidies. 

3. During the whole of the said period from 1882 to 1891, the Honour- 
tble Sir Adolphe P. Caron was, and still is, a member of the House of Com- 
mons of Canada, a member of the Canadian Government, and one of Her 
Majesty's Privy Councillors for Canada. 

4. That the said Sir A. P. Caron was, during the w T hole, or the greater 
part of the said period, one of the members of the said Construction Company, 
jand thus had means of knowledge of, and did know of the dealings with the 
'said subsidies and their destination after they were paid over by the Govern- 
ment to the said Railway Company. 

5. That during the said period, and while the said railway was being 
constructed in part by means of said subsidies, the said Sir A. P. Caron cor- 
ruptly received large sums of money out of the said subsidies, and from moneys 
raised upon the credit of the same, and from parties beneficially interested in 
the same. 

6. That during the said period out of said subsidies, and out of moneys 
raised upon the credit of the same, and from parties beneficially interested in 
the same, large sums of money were from time to time corruptly paid and 
contributed, at the request and with the knowledge of said Sir A. P. Caron, for 
election purposes, and to aid in the election to the House of Commons of the 
said Sir A. P. Caron, and other members and supporters of the Government 
of which he was a member, and that after some of such last-mentioned corrupt 
payments and contributions w r ere made, further and other subsidies were 
granted and paid to the said Railway Company by the Government of which 
Sir A. P. Caron was a member. 

7. That the Temiscouata Railway Company was given incorporation by 
Letters Patent issued by the Canadian Government on 6th October, 1885, and 
since that date the said Railway Company has received from the Dominion 
of Canada subsidies to the extent of $649,200 — which subsidies were voted by 
Parliament on the recommendation of Ministers of the Crown. 

8. That since the 6th October, 1885, and while the said Temiscouata 
Railway was being constructed in part by means of the said subsidies, the said 
Sir A. P. Caron corruptly received large sums of money from the persons who 
from time to time controlled the said Temiscouata Railway Company and the 
said subsidies, or who were beneficially interested in the said subsidies. 

9. That also since the said 6th October, 1885, the persons who from time 
to time controlled the said Temiscouata Railway Company and the said sub- 
sidies, or who were beneficially interested in the said subsidies, paid and 
contributed large sums at the request, and with the knowledge of the said Sir 
A. P. Caron, for election purposes to aid in the election to the House of 
Commons of the said Sir A. P. Caron, and other members and supporters of 
the Goverifment of which he was a member, and that after some of such last- 
mentioned corrupt payments and contributions were made, further and other 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 

subsidies were granted and paid to the said Eailway Company by the Goverrj 
ment of which the said Sir A. P. Caron was a member. 

That in the course of the Debate arising on the resolution based on sucl 
statements of the said Mr Edgar, it was stated by the Honourable Mr. Millg 
the member representing the Electoral District of Dothwell, as follows : — 

" So when the leader of the Government and his colleague undertake tl 
seriously argue that this House is denuded of all its power to enquire into th' 
misappropriation of public money for the purpose of corrupting the elector] 
of this country, because the trial of election petitions has been referred to thj 
courts, I take issue with those hon. gentlemen on that ground. The trial d 
election petitions is one thing. The use of public money for deliberate corrud 
tion of the electors by a member of the Administration is a proper matter foj 
enquiry by this House, and is not in the smallest degree restricted in any wa 
by reason of the trial of election petitions having been referred to the courts.! 

That it was further stated by the said' Mr. Mills : "These charges poir 
to a member of this House in his official capacity as a member of the Admin 
istration, rather than to his conduct as a member of this House. What, il 
effect, are the charges here made ? They point to the fact that, the Crown wa 
advised to appropriate large sums of money for particular purposes, and tha 
these moneys were diverted from these public purposes and placed in th 
hands of a Minister of the Crown for the purpose of corrupting the electorat 
in certain portions of the Dominion of Canada." 

That it was further stated by the said Mr. Mills : " There is a statemec 
made here that this hon. gentleman, the Postmaster-General, is the Ministd 
of the Crown who advised these subsidies being appropriated to aid these con) 
panies. There is a charge that he obtained a portion of the subsidy so voted 
or its equivalent, from these companies, and used it for his own purpose if 
his own election, and in the elections in twenty-three constituencies in th: 
Dominion. That charge is specific and clear enough. It is also stated thi 
after some of these moneys were received by him this same gentleman advise 
the Crown to grant other subsidies to other parties, and that from these othe; 
subsidies, moneys were also obtained." 

That it was further stated by the said Mr. Mills as follows : — 

" If he advised the Crown to make these appropriations, and had J 
understanding with one of the railway companies participating in them th 
these moneys, or a portion of them, should go to him, we ought to know it ; 
we are entitled to know it." 

That it was stated in the said Debate by Sir Richard Cartwright, tbj 
member representing the Electoral District of the South Riding of Oxford 
referring to the said charges of the said Mr. Edgar, as follows : — 

" What in the name of wonder is it that my hon. friend beside me hs 
charged the Postmaster-General with ? He has charged him in no vague lai! 
guage, but in terms, with being guilty of the most corrupt conspiracy, for ta 
purpose of destroying the electoral liberties of the people of Canada, of whicj 
any adviser of the Crown can be found guilty." 

It was stated in the said Debate by Mr. Edgar aforesaid, as follows : — | 

" Those railways which are involved in this charge were aided by tl. 
Dominion and Provincial Governments, and what I complain of is the apprcj 
priation of Dominion subsidies to the Postmaster-General." And again : 

" The Minister of Marine drew a nice point when he said that I did no 

should have done, charge his colleague with public robbery. •Well, I di 
not put it in those words but in words which I certainly intended to mea| 

4 



Edgvir versus ( 'aron. 

robbing the public. If it is not public robbery for a member to take moneys 
lout of publio subsidies, I would like to know what is." And again : 

"So I think il I get a chance to go on and prove these charges there will 
r hat is, under the law, a most abominable conspiracy." 

That, from the aforesaid statements made by the said J. D. Edgar, and 
troni comments and arguments thereon by the said David Mills and Sir Richard 
Oartwrighl and the said James D. Edgar from their places in this Houm it 
1 1 (pears that it was the intention of the said J. D. Edgar by said statement to 
charge Sir A. P. Caron, a member of this House, and of the Honourable the 
Privy Council of Canada, with grave offences and derelictions of duty, not- 
withstanding that the said statement of the said J. D. Edgar, first above cited, 
did not make any definite or precise charge against him. 

That the following charges and allegations are indicated by the said state- 
ment made by the said J. D. Edgar, and by the comments and arguments of 
the aforesaid other members of this House, and by his own comments thereon 
as intended to be made in the said statement, against the said Sir A. P. Caron, 
namely: 

1. That during each of the years 1882 to 1891, inclusive, the Quebec and 
Lake St. John Railway Company received by way of bonus from the Domi- 
nion of Canada, subsidies amounting in the aggregate to upwards of a million 
of dollars, which subsidies were voted by Parliament on the recommendation 
of Ministers of the Crown 

2. That, during the whole of the said period from 1882 to 1891, the 
Honourable Sir A. P. Caron was, and still is, a member of the Canadian Gov- 
ernment, and one of Her Majesty's Privy Councillors for Canada, and also a 
member of the House of Commons in each Parliament which has been elected 
since the year 1 882. 

3. That during the said period, and while the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway was being constructed in part by means of said subsidies, the said Sir 
A. P. Caron knowingly aided and participated in diverting the said subsidies 
from the purpose for which they were granted, by receiving, for election pur- 

i poses, from the said railway company, or from a construction company tormed 
for the construction of the said railway, or from one H. J. Beemer, as manager 
! thereof, or contractor of the said railway, la'ge sums of money out of the said 
j subsidies, and out of moneys raised upon the credit of the same ; and also, 
during the said period, did further knowingly so aid and participate byobtain- 
I ing from the said companies, or one of them, the payment out of said subsidies, 
| and out of moneys raised by the said companies, or one of them, on the credit 
: of the same, of large sums of money for election purposes, and to aid in the 
! election to the House of Commons of the said Sir A. P. Caron, and other 
i members and supporters of the Government of which he was a member. 

4. That, after some of (he last-mentioned payments were so obtained and 
1 made, the said Sir A. P. Caron, in consideration thereof, corruptly aided and 
' assisted the said Company to obtain further and other subsidies from the 

Dominion Parliament. 

5. That, since the 6th of October, 1 885, the said Temiscouata Railway 
Company received various subsidies from the Dominion of Canada, amounting, 
in all, to about $649,200, and that the said Sir A. P. Caron knowingly aided 
and participated in diverting the said subsidies from the purposes for which 
they were granted, by receiving from the said Company large sums of money 
out the said subsidies, or out of moneys raised on the credit of the same, and 
also by obtaining the payment by the said Company, out of the said subsidies, 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18931 

or out of moneys raised on the credit of the same, of very large sums 
money to aid in his election as a member of the House of Commons, and in 
the election of other persons as members of the House. 

6. That after some of the last-mentioned payments were so obtained and 
made, the said Sir A. P. Caron, in consideration thereof, corruptly aided an 
assisted the said Company to obtain further and other subsidies from th 
Dominion Parliament. 

7. That the said Sir A. P. Caron misappropriated public money for the 
purpose of corrupting the electors of Canada, to wit, a portion of the mone 
voted as subsidies as hereinbefore stated. 

8. That the Crown having been advised to appropriate large sums o. 
money for public purposes, to wit, the said subsidies, such moneys, or a port! 
of them, were diverted from the purposes for which they were so appropriated 
and placed in the hands of Sir A. P. Caron for the purpose of corrupting th 
electorate in certain portions of Canada. 

9. That the said Sir A. P. Caron had an understanding, when the sa 
subsidies or some of them were voted or recommended, with one or more o 
the railway companies participating in said appropriations, or with a perso 
or persons interested in said appropriations, that the moneys so appropria 
by Parliament, or portions of. them, should go to him. 

10. That the said Sir A. P. Caron, by virtue of the fact so alleged, entere 
into a corrupt conspiracy with the said companies, or one or more of them. 

That, in the opinion of this House, it is expedient that enquiry should b 
made as to the truth or falsity of the allegations and charges last mentioned 
and numbered respectively 1, 2, e, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 (being the allegation 
and charges included in the original statement of the said James D. Edgar,! 
and those made in the course of the debate thereon), and that for that purpose 
the House deems it proper and convenient that the evidence relating to such 
allegations and charges should be taken by one or more commissioners to be 
appointed under chapter 114 of the Revised Statutes of Cauada, and having 
all the powers mentioned in said chapter, and that such evidence should be 
laid before this House when completed.. 

That the names of the said Commissioner or Commissioners be submitted; 
for the approval of this House before his or their appointment. 

And whekeas it is expedient, pursuant to the said resolution of the House' 
of Commons, that enquiry under oath should be made as to the truth or! 
falsity of the said charges or allegations mentioned ; 

And whereas the names of you the said Adolphe Basile Routhier, and, 
Melbourne M. Tait, having been submitted to, were duly approved by, the 
said House of Commons, — 

Now know Ye, that under and by virtue of all and every the powers and 
power, in that behalf vested in Us, and by and with the advice of Our Privy 
Council for Canada, We, reposing trust and confidence in your loyalty, in- 

iv and ability, have nominated, constituted and appointed, and do hereby 
nominate, constitute and appoint you the said Adolphe Basile Routhier and 
Melbourne M. Tail to bo Our Commissioners to take evidence as to the truth 
or falsity of th. said charges and allegations so made as aforesaid against the! 
said Sir Adolphe I'. Caron and hereinbefore more particularly mentioned am; 

set ollt. 

And under and by virtue of the powers vested in Us by the statute lastlyj 
hereinbefore recited, We do hereby authorize and empower you as such Com- 
missioners to summon before you any witnesses who may be able to testify oi 

(J 



Ederar versus ( ;ii/on. 



'& 



to produce documents showing the truth or falsity of the charges or allega- 
tions aforesaid, and require them to give evidence on oath orally, or in writing 
or on solemn affirmation, in case they are persons entitled to affirm in civil 
matters and to produce such documents and things as you our said Com- 
missioners shall deem requisite to the full investigation and procuring oi flic 
evidence with respect to the matters into which you are hereby appointed to 
enquire and examine. 

• And We do hereby confer upon you all the powers and authority which 
We are authorized by the said statute to confer. 

And We ordain and instruct that a record shall be made of all the 
evidence and documents which shall be given before you as to the aforesaid 
statements, charges and allegations, and that in the event of a difference of 
opinion arising as to the admissibility of any evidence or documents submitted 
to you as such Commissioners, then such evidence shall be taken and such 
documents shall be received, subject to any objection which may arise or appear 
to you, and shall be recorded separately. 

To have, hold, exercise and enjoy the said office, place and trust unto you 
the said Adolphe Basile Routhier, and unto you the said Melbourne M. Tait, 
together with the rights, powers and privileges and emoluments unto the said 
office, place and trust, of right and by law appertaining, during pleasure. 

And We do hereby require and direct you to report to Our Secretary of 
State for Canada, the evidence taken before you as such Commissioners as 
aforesaid. 

In Testimony Whereof, We have caused these Our Letters to be made 
Patent and the Great Seal of Canada to be hereunto affixed. Wit- 
ness, Our Right Trusty and Well-Beloved the Right Honourable Sir 
Frederick Arthur Stanley, Baron Stanley of Preston, in the County 
of Lancaster, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom ; Knight Grand 
Cross of Our Most Honourable Order of the Bath ; Governor-General 
of Canada. 
At Our Government House, in Our City of OTTAWA, this SIX- 
TEENTH day of JUNE, in the year of Our Lord one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-two, and in the Fifty-fifth year of Our 
Reign. 

By Command. 

L. A. CATELLIER, 

Under Secretary of State. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 



Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council 
on the 20th June, 1892. 

The Committee, on the recommendation of the President of the Privy 
Council, advise that no fees he exacted for the issue of Commissions to Mr. 
Justice Routhier and Mr. Justice Tait, members of the Royal Commission, 
appointed to enquire into certain charges and allegations preferred against Sir 
Adolphe P. Caron, a member of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada. 

JOHF J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council, 



Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, 
approved by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council 
on the 20th January, 1893. 

On a report dated 23rd December, 1892, from the Minister of Justice, 
submitting herewith a memorandum of the expenses incurred in taking the 
evidence in connection with the investigation of the charges against the 
Honourable Sir A. P. Caron, KC.M.G. 

The Minister recommends that authority be granted to pay the amount 
of the expenses, and to charge the same to the vote for " Litigated Matters." 

The Committee advise that the requisite authority be granted accordingly. 

JOHN J. McGEE, 

Clerk of the Privy Council. 



Kdir.ir versus ( !aron. 



MEMORANDUM. 

Hon. Mr. Justice Routhier, fee as Commissioner s 250 00 

L Hon. Mr. Justice Tait " " 250 00 

" travelling expenses 217 49 

S. Archibald, Q.C., retainer (to cover solicitor work) $ 500 00 

20 days at $75 1,500 00 

2,000 00 

Paid for travelling expenses $ 254 51 

G. F. Ham el, salary as secretary 

of the Commission 500 00 

G. F. Hamel, disbursements for 
messenger, bailiffs, station- 
ery, &c 117 03 

Telegrams 6 66 

Bailiffs, and serving subpoenas.... 13 00 

Witness and accountants' fee 595 00 

Copying 7 30 

1,493 50 

!. J. Bisaillon, Q.C., counsel fee, 18 days at $50 $ 900 00 

Travelling expenses 170 00 

1,070 50 

. Owens, stenographer 367 50 

!. O*. Marceau " 61 75 

L Desjardins " 17 90 

$5,728 64 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18S 



To the Honourable 

The Secretary of State for Canada, 

Ottawa. 

Sir: — The undersigned Commissioners, appointed by Royal Commissi*!, 
under the Great Seal of the Dominion of Canada, dated the 16th day of Jol 
last, to take evidence as to the truth or falsity of certain charges therein jt 
forth, made against Sir Adolphe P. Caron, K.C.M.Gr., Member of the Hoiii 
of Commons of Canada, and of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada, and!) 
report to you the evidence taken before them, have the honour to report jj 

1. That they held their first meeting in the Court House at the cityl 
Quebec, on the 8th day of September last, when the Commission was read I 
the Secretary, and Mr. J. S. Archibald, Q.C., annouced that he appeared ft 
behalf of the Crown. The Commission then adjourned to meet again at m 
same place at the hour of half past ten in the forenoon, on the 20th of s;l 
September, for the purpose of taking evidence. 

2. The Commissioners, as they deemed it their duty to do, notified m 
James D. Edgar, member of the House of Commons, of the time and placep 
fixed for taking evidence and requested him to furnish them with a list of 1 
witnesses he desired to have examined. In reply to this notice, Mr. Edg 
for reasons stated in his letter, declined to assume any responsibility for 1 
prosecution of an enquiry, under the reference as drawn, and added a pc 
script, wherein he gave a list of the witnesses whom he would have cal 
and of the documents and papers which he would have required them 
produce, had he been given, as he states, an opportunity to prove his charg 

3. The Commissioners met according to such notice. Mr. Archiba 
Q.C., and Mr. Bissaillon, Q.C., appeared for the Crown, and Mr. Ferguson, Q. 
Mr. Pentland, Q.C., and Mr. Fitzpatrick, for Sir Adolphe P. Caron ; and 1 
examination of the witnesses was commenced. 

4. Adjournments were allowed, from time to time, to meet the con 
nience of counsel and of the witnesses. 

5. The sittings of the Commission were public and accommodation v 
afforded for reporters of the public press. 

6. All the persons named by Mr. Edgar, with the exception of 
Adolphe P. Caron, were duly summoned to appear and to produce the do 
minis referred to by him. 

7. They all did appear, and were examined by the counsel for the Cro| 
in Buch ;i manner as to bring out any evidence, oral or documentary, pertirij 
to thf enquiry that could be obtained from them, and they were open 
cross-examination by the counsel for Sir Adolphe P. Caron. 

8. At the conclusion of their examination, Sir Adolphe P. Caron, hav 
expressed a desire to make a statement, was allowed to be examined in I 
own behalf by bis counsel, and was cross-examined by the counsel for 
Crown. 

9. At the request of the latter, and also to afford time, to prepare 
record for transmission, the Commission then adjourned for a few days, | 
met again on the l!)th instant, when the investigation was declared closed 

10 



Edgar versus ( laron. 

10. Nothing occurred during the course of the enquiry to indicate, nor 
i\t- the Commissioners any reason to believe that any person, other than 

examined, is possessed of information relevant thereto. 

11. They now transmit : — 

(1.) The letter of Mr. Edgar to the Commissioners, above referred to, and 
rtain correspondence between the counsel for the Crown and that gentleman ; 
(2.) A list of the names of the witnesses examined ; 
(3.) A list of the exhibits produced, with a summary of the contents of 

xhibit ; 
(4.) The depositions given by witnesses ; 
(5.) The exhibits so fyled. 

The whole respectfully submitted. 

A. B. ROUTHIER 



M M TAIT f C ommiss i° ners - 



ebec, 24th November, 1892. 



Toronto, Sept. 18th, 1892. 

The Hon. A. B. Routhier, 
The Hon. M. M. Tait, 

Commissioners, &c. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from 
you of the 8th instant, enclosing a copy of the Royal Commission dated 16th 
June last, and informing you that you will meet as Commissioners at Quebec 
Dn 20th instant, for the purpose of taking evidence thereunder. I am also 
requested by you to furnish to the Commissioners a list of the witnesses whom 
,1 may wish to examine. 

In answer to this request, I beg to submit with all respect, a statement of 
the position I propose to take in regard to this Royal Commission, and some 
of my reasons for doing so. 

I made certain charges in my place in the House of Commons against 
Sir Adolphe Caron who is also a member of the House of Commons, and I 
moved for an investigation thereof by a committee of that House, having 
power to take evidence under oath. 

The majority of the House did not accede to my motion but the Hon. 
Mr. Bo well, a colleague of Sir Adolphe Caron in the Ministry, proposed by 
!way of amendment that other and different charges should be referred to a 
Royal Commission to take evidence thereon. Mr. Bowell's amendment was 
carried, and these latter charges are the subject of the present enquiry. Grave 
objections have been taken by many of the leading and most experienced 
[members of the House of Commons to the action of the House in this case. 
They have expressed a conviction that it was entirely unprecedented, opposed 
|to Parliamentary laws and usage as settled by the practice of the mother 
country, a violation of the privileges of members of the House of Commons, 
laud designed to elude and defeat the ends of justice. 

11 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189;! 

While sharing these views, I would have been personally disposed td 
waive them in this instance if the charges made had been fairly laid before 
you for investigation. Such, however, had not been the case. 

My charges are not fairly nor fully submitted to you, and to show yoij 
that it was intended by the Government that they should be inquired into, .1 
beg to quote the language of the Minister of Justice and leader of the House: 
who, referring to my charges in the debate on the motion for a committed 
used the following significant words : — " I have already said enough to shovj 
that the charges do not come within the category of charges which I men| 
tioned as those in which the House could properly exercise its authority and 
jurisdiction ;" and also " as the Resolution comes before the House I shalj 
ask the House not to support it." 

I wish to mention and to place on record some of the instances when 
Mr. Bowell's charges as referred to you have omitted essential portions of m; 
charges ; and also where they include charges which I neither made, no, 
suggested, nor believed to be true. 

There is in the first place, a wilful and flagrant omission from the text o 
the Royal Commission. This omission cannot be understood by the Commit 
sioners from a mere perusal of the document itself, which contains a grave mis 
statement of fact, and a suppression of highly important matter. 

Your Commission informs you that a resolution was passed by the Hous| 
of Commons stating that " James D. Edgar, the member representing thi 
Electoral District of the West Riding of Ontario in this House, having statei 
from his place in this House, that he is credibly informed and believes that h 
can establish by satisfactory evidence that, etc." Here follow 9 numbered 
charges as I presented them — but the Commissioners will be surprised to lean 
that my charges are 10 in number, and the 1 0th is deliberately left out of th 
statement or recital of what my charges were. 

By reference to the Votes and Proceedings of the House of Commons ci 
6th April, and 4th May, 1892, it will be seen that my 10th charge was a 
follows : — 

" That the said sums of money hereinbefore mentioned in paragraphs 
and 9, as paid and contributed for election purposes, were so used, togethe 
with other sums contributed by public contractors with the Dominion Govern 
ment, and were controlled and distributed by fhe direct authority and wit; 
the knowledge of the said Sir A. P. Oaron, in lavish and illegal amounts foj 
the purpose of corruptly influencing the electors, and in the general electio 
of 1887 alone, upwards of $100,000 of moneys so contributed were so used fc 
ili<' i mi rpose of corruptly influencing the electors in the following Electoral 
Districts, that is to say: — The Counties of St. Maurice, Champlain, Levis! 
Montmorency, Charlevoix, Kamouraska, Temiscouata, L'Islet, Dorcheste:; 
Berthier, Portneuf, Quebec, Gaspe, Rimouski, Montmagny, Bellechasse, Beauci 
and M^gantic, and Quebec West, Quebec Centre, Quebec East, and Tim 
Rivei 

I made two grave and specific charges in No. 10, namely : — That (1) Th 
mi ins of money mentioned in my paragraphs 6 and 9. (2) Together with th 
other sums contributed by public contractors with the Dominion Governmen 
were controlled and distributed by the direct authority and with the kno\ 
ledge of the said Sir A.dolphe Caron in lavish and illegal amounts for the pu 
pose of corruptly influencing the electors. Then, in order to be specific an 
clear^ I particularized I >v giving the names of 22 counties in which $100,00 
wen d in one election. Yet this whole charge is unfairly omitted eve 

L2 



Edgkr versus ( Jaron. 

roni the recital of what my charges were, as well as from the subjects for your 
nquiry. 

It will be observed that in each of my charges, 5, 6, 8 and 9, I charged 
Sir Adolphe Caron with corruptly receiving money from persons who were 

licially interested in said subsidies. 

This charge has been absolutely eliminated from all parts of the refer- 
mce to the Commissioners and yet it cannot be denied that it is one of the 
gravest character. 

To make, apparently, up for this omission, an entirely new charge or 
erics of charges, may be found in Mr. BowelPs statement, which is referred 
you for inquiry. 

In Mr. BowelPs charge 3, referring to the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway Company, it is alleged that Sir Adolphe Caron received large sums 
>f money for election purposes "from said railway company" or " from a cons- 
truction company formed for the construction ot the said railway." 

I made no such charge ; I do not believe in its truth, and in a speech I 
expressly informed the House that the. money was not obtained from the 
companies, but "from persons who were beneficially interested in said 
subsidies." 

Then in Mr. BowelPs charge 5, referring to the Temiscouata Railway 
Company it is alleged that the said Sir Adolphe Caron diverted the said sub- 
sidies by receiving large sums of money "from the said company," and " by 
obtaining the payment by the said company" of very large sums of money. 

Again, I say, no such charge was made by me, and the Government 
knew why I did not make it. 

In Mr. BowelPs No. 6, the same charge as to the companies is repeated, 
because it speaks of " the last mentioned payments so obtained and made." 

The assumed dealings with the railway company are again introduced in 
Mr. BowelPs charge No. 9, and in his final charge No. 10, a corrupt con- 
spiracy is boldly charged to have existed for Sir Adolphe Caron and the said 
companies or one or more of them ; and this in spite of my distinct assertions 
to the contrary. 

In Mr. BowelPs motion of reference as it appears on the face of this 
royal commission he did me the honour to quote an extract from a speech I made 
in the House of Commons during a debate on my motion. May I be per- 
mitted to make a further extract from a speech delivered by me in the same 
debate, and one week before Mr. Bowell introduced his amendment ? On 27th 
April, 1892, I said :— 

" Perhaps I had better allow the Postmaster-General to draw up these 
charges himself and let him have them just as he would like them to be. I 
do not know how else I can satisfy the hon. gentleman on the other side 
of the House. I dare say if the Postmaster-General had the drawing of these 
charges he would limit them for instance to the charge that he received from 
the Lake St. John Railway so much money out of the subsidies, and another 
charge, that he received from the Temiscouata Railway Company so much 
money out of the subsidies, and then he would valiantly disprove those 
charges. I imagine that these are the charges he would like to see there, 
from the fact that although there is not a syllable of allegation in the charge 
from beginning to end that he received money from either of these corpora- 
tions as corporations, still, when he got up he told us with a great flourish 
of trumpets that he had voluntarily received telegrams or letters from the 
managers of these two companies saying that he has never received any 

13 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189:- 

moneys from those companies. Why, Mr. Speaker, nobody said he did' 
Does he imagine that anybody would think or believe that a railway corpora 
tion like that of the Lake St. John Railway, with a board formed, for instance* 
of representatives of the city of Quebec, would calmly sit down at their boari 
meeting and pass a formal resolution, or that a meeting of shareholders woulij 
pass a resolution to pay so much money out of their subsidy to the Hon 
Postmaster-General for himself or his elections ? No, Sir, it is absurd, ana 
the Hon. Postmaster-General when he made that declaration was simplj 
setting up a man of straw and knocking him down again." 

On 4th May, after Mr. Bo well's amendment had been moved, during thj 
debate, and before the vote was taken, I quoted the above extract from raj 
former speech, and added these words : — " Why, Sir, I was prophetic on tha 
occasion, they have done exactly what I anticipated, but hardly believed would 
be possible." 

In the face of my express omission to charge Sir Adolphe Caron with thi 
receipt of moneys from any company or corporate body, after my explici 
statement in Parliament that I did not make and could not prove any sucij 
charges, and although I had distinctly warned the Government of the futilit ! 
and deception of any such allegation, yet we find, them making that ver 
charge the prominent feature of this inquiry, and I am called upon to support ii 

I have shown that I did not make the charges referred to you, and thaj 
I did make other charges, which are not referred to you. 

The charges which I made I was prepared to substantiate, and I indicat) 
in a postscript to this letter the names of witnesses whom I would hav 
summoned. 

Whether the Commissioners will continue their inquiries when they hav 
been informed of the true position of matters, it is not for me to suggest. 
am, however, firmly of opinion that neither in the interest of justice, nor i 
common self-respect, should I assume any responsibility for the prosecutiol 
of an inquiry under a reference which appears to have been skilfully drawl 
to baffle investigation and to screen the offenders. 

I have the honour to be, gentlemen, your obedient servant, 

J. D. EDGAR. 

Postscript to letter of 13£/i September, 1892. 

Although I have been refused the investigation I demanded, and while 
declined to take any part in this reference fpr the reasons stated, yet I tak| 
this occasion to make public a list of witnesses whom I would have called haj 
I been given the opportunity to prove my charges, namely : — 

1. Sir Adolphe Caron, whom I would have also called upon to produc; 
for inspection his bank books, cheque books and books of account, during th« 
period from 1882 to 1891. 

2. The Secretary of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Constructiof 
Company, and the production by him of all contracts, sub-contracts, an 
agreements in connection with the construction of or financing for the Quebe 
and Lake St. John Railway; also the minute books, and books of account c 
the company, and any books showing the receipt or transfer of any Dominion 
subsidies. 

8. The Secretary of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company 
and the production of books showing dates of the receipt and payment o 
disposal of Dominion subsidies. 

14 



Edgar versus ( !aron. 

4. The Secretary of the Temiscouata Railway Company, and the pro- 
Ijiction of books showing the dates of the receipl and payment or disposal of 

iminion subsidies. 

5. The Hon. Thomas McGreevy, whom I woidd also have required to 
oduce all books, bank books, cheque books, cheque stubs, receipts, letters, 

3, papers and vouchers relating to the receipt and to the payments of 
iction expenditures while he acted as political treasurer of the conservative 
itv in the district of Quebec. 

6. J. J. Macdonald, whom I would also have required to produce all 
ments, correspondence and papers of all kinds relating to the purchase 

him of his interest in the Temiscouata Railway, and all vouchers, notes or 

ies connected with, and books containing entries relating to the payment 

him of the consideration therefor, and all vouchers, notes or cheques con- 

d with, or books containing entries relating to the payment of moneys to 

d in the election of Sir Adolphe Caron or other members or supporters of 

ie Government of which he was a member since the said J. J. McDonald 

quired an interest in said railway and became beneficially interested in 

I >ominion subsidies to said railway. 

7. J. Israel Tarte, whom I would also require to produce all agreements, 
>rrespondence, papers, vouchers, or documents of any kind relating to the 
iile to J. J. Macdonald of an interest in the Temiscouata Railway, or to the 
ivment of the consideration therefor, or to contributions by any person bene- 
pially interested in the subsidies to said railway for election purposes, to aid 
it the election to the House of Commons of Sir Adolphe Caron or other mem- 
|3rs or supporters of the Government of which he was a member. 

8. Dr. Grandbois, M.R, whom I would also require to produce all agree- 
ments, correspondence, papers, vouchers or documents of any kind relating 

the sale to J. J. Macdonald of an interest in the Temiscouata Railway, or 
the payment of the consideration therefor, or to contributions by any person 
eneficially interested in the subsidies to said railway for election purposes to 
id in the election to the House of Commons of Sir Adolphe Caron or other 
lembers or supporters of the Government of which he was a member. 

9. A. R. MacDonald, whom I would also require to produce all agree- 
lents, correspondence, papers, vouchers or documents of any kind relating to 
;ie sale to J. J. Macdonald of an interest in the Temiscouata Railway, or to 
ue payment of the consideration therefor, or to contributions by any persons 
jeneficially interested in the subsidies to said railway for election purposes to 
id in the election to the House of Commons of Sir Adolphe Caron or other 
jiembers or supporters of the Government of which he was a member. 

10. The representatives of the estate of the late Hon. J. G Ross, of 
'uebec, and the production of all agreements, vouchers, papers, correspon- 
ded connected with the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, or 
pe construction thereof, or the financing therefor, and also all notes or 
ouchers, books containing entries, relating to payments to or for Sir 
\dolphe Caron while the late J. G. Ross was connected with the construction 
f, or financing for, the said railway or beneficially interested in the Dominion 
ubsidies thereto. 

11. H. J. Beemer, and the production by him of all contracts, agreements, 
ooks, papers or correspondence relating to the construction of the Quebec and 
^ake St. John Railway, or the financing therefor, and all notes, cheques, 
heque stubs, vouchers, bank pass books, books of account or any other 
japers, letters or documents relating to or containing entries relating to the 

15 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18: 

payments of money to Sir Adolphe Caron or relating to contributions i. 
election purposes to aid in the election to the House of Commons of i 
Adolphe Caron, or other members or supporters of the Government of whiii 
he was a member. 

12. The Manager of the Quebec Bank at Quebec, and the production 
all books showing the discount and deposit and general accounts of i 
Adolphe Caron and Thomas McGreevy during the period from 1882 to 181 
while subsidies were being granted for the construction of the Quebec a! 
Lake St. John Eailway, and the Temiscouata Railway. 

13. The Manager of the Banque du Peuple at Quebec, and the prodij 
tion of all books showing the discount and deposit and general accounts of 'I 
Adolphe Caron and Thomas McGreevy during the period from 1882 to 181., 
while subsidies were being granted for the construction of the Quebec all 
Lake St. John Railway, and the Temiscouata Railway. 

14. In the Votes and Proceedings of the House of Commons of 1(1 
June, 1892, in a Notice of Motion given by Sir Richard Cartwright, are to i 
found copies of letters, receipts and other documents which seem to hav6|i 
direct and essential relevancy to the charges which I made in the Housed 
Commons. In case of failure to secure the production of the originals fr< i 
Mr. Thomas McGreevy, I would have called upon Mr. John Alexander, of tp 
Engraving Bureau, 16 Adelaide Street, West, Toronto, to produce and pre: 
the photographic fac-similes thereof which he had executed. 

J. D. E. 



Montreal, November 9th, 1892. 
James D. Edgar, Esq., Q.C., M.P. 

Be Caron Charges. 

Sir, — "We have before us your letter dated at Toronto, the 13th Septefi 
ber last, addressed to the Honourable Basile Routhier and Honourable M. . 
Tait, Commissioners, stating your reasons for declining to be presein 
assist the Commissioners in the investigation of the matters referred to th< 
by the commission. 

We very much regret that you should have felt called upon to adi 
this course, especially in view of the wide range of subjects covered b; 
Commission, and the earnest desire of all parties connected with the en 
to take advantage of every means which might assist in discovering the tru 
Allow us to call your attention to a portion of Mr. Archibald's letter to 3 I 
of the 5th September last, namely: — "I beg to inform you that I have b 
retained by the Government of Canada as counsel to conduct the investigate 1 
referred to in the commission, a copy of which is herewith enclosed. Inasnn n 
as the resolution of the House of Commons by virtue of which the Comm 
issued was mainly based upon charges originally preferred by yourself, I 1 
instructed to inform you that my professional services are at your dispell 
for the purpose of enabling you, so far as possible to substantiate these charts 
or any of them, and I will be glad to meet you at any time and place ju 
may specify for the purpose of consultation and receiving your instructions. I 
am further desired to request that you be present at the investigation, and 

16 



Edgar versus ( Jaron. 

vould take it as a favour if you would, in the meantime, furnish me with the 
tamos of all persons whom you wish or think desirable should be summoned 
L witnesses and I will see that all efforts are made to seeure their attend- 
ance, the government paying their expenses. 

• " I am instructed to give all possible consideration to your suggestions 
whether made in the meantime, or during the progress of the investigation. 

am authorised to state that the Crown will pay your personal expenses while 
ittending the investigation." 

In giving your reasons for non-compliance with our request you first 
rtated that u grave objections had been taken by leading and experienced raem- 
>f the House of Commons to the course pursued by the Government, 
From a constitutional standpoint, but added that you were personally disposed to 
o waive any objection of that character, if the charges had been fairly laid before 
rhe commission for investigation." It will be unnecessary for us to say anything 
upon the constitutional point which you refer to, particularly as that was a 
matter for the House of Commons. There remains then your complaint : 

1. That a wilful omission was made by the Government in the drafting 
of the Commission by wholly omitting from the statement of your charges as 
made in the House any reference to your tenth charge, which was as follows : — 
••That the said sums of money hereinbefore mentioned in paragraphs 6 and 9, 
as paid and contributed for election purposes were so used, together with 
other sums contributed by public contractors with the Dominion Government, 
and were controlled and distributed by the direct authority and with the 
jknowledge of Sir A. P. Caron, in lavish and illegal amounts for the purpose 
lof corruptly influencing the electors, and in the general election of 1887 alone, 
iiipwards of $100,000 of monies so contributed were so used for the purpose 
of corruptly influencing the electors in the following electoral districts, that is 
to say : — The counties of St. Maurice, Champlain, L'Islet, Dorchester, Ber- 
thier, Portneuf, Quebec, Gaspe, Rimouski, Montmagny, Montmorency, Char- 
levoix, Kamouraska, Temiscouata, Levis, Bellechasse, Beauce and Megantic, 
and in Quebec East, Quebec West, Quebec Centre and Three Rivers." 

2. That this charge, though of grave import, was also entirely omitted 
from the statement of matters to be investigated by the Commission. 

3. That the other charges were so changed, principally by limiting the 
scope of the enquiry in a manner to prevent the Commission from investigat- 
ing transactions relating to the subsidies granted to the two railway companies 
referred to, after such subsidies had passed through the hands of said com- 
panies and into the hands of other persons beneficially interested therein, that 
you could not prove the charges as actually referred and did not believe them 
to be true. 

4. That other charges which you neither made nor believed to be true 
were referred to the Commission for investigation. 

Before proceeding to some observations as to whether your complaints were 
■ well founded or not, let us call your attention to the scope and object of the 
i Commission as set forth on the sixth pa£e of the copy sent you as follows : — 
"That in the opinion of this House it is expedient that enquiry should be made 
as to the truth or falsity of the allegations and charges last mentioned 
(namely, u those formulated by the House itself as being the purport of com- 
munications made to the House by you and other members") and that for 
that purpose the House deems it proper and convenient that the evidence 
relating to such allegations and charges should be taken by one or more Com- 
missioners," etc. The Commission then proceeds to define the duties of the 

17 
27—2 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 1 

Commissioners, and finally directs them to report to the Secretary of State thej 
evidence taken before them. It appears to us that your letter bears evidence; 
of two misapprehensions on your part : — 

1. That you have such a political responsibility towards the House arising 
out of it3 final determination upon the matter submitted to the Commission as 
your letter implies ; 

2. That your assistance was asked for the purpose of putting yon inj 
default upon the prosecution of }^our own charges. 

The charges, as we view them, are formulated by the House, upon its 
own responsibility as being in effect and substance charges which were madej 
in the House. They were based, it is true, chiefly upon the statements made) 
by you (presumably after careful scrutiny of the sources from which youij 
information was derived) and it was solely because it was assumed that you 
would be therefore, in an exceptional manner, able to aid the labours of thej 
Commission, that, by the direction of the Government, as we above stated] 
we requested your attendance and assistance. 

From the above considerations it is evident that, so far as your objections! 
are concerned, the only question material to be decided is, whether all thd 
evidence which could have been legally adduced under your charges as madcj 
in the House, would also be relevant under the charges as actually submitted 
to the Commission. We submit that it is not at all competent for you tc 
complain that the charges formulated by the House contain more than those 
alleged by you, provided that the statements made by you to the House coulc 
be relevantly proved as elements in the charges which the House' actually 
made, and which it sent to the Commission for investigation. 

Keeping these considerations in view, we will not refer to your objection! 
seriatim : , 

With regard to the first objection that your tenth charge had been wil 
fully omitted in the recital of your charges as made in the Commission, w< 
can see no ground for it to rest on, nor even any explanation of your having 
made it, other than that it was a mistake arising from a hurried and imperl 
feet examination of the matter. That charge (your tenth) referred to electora 
corruption in a large number of counties at a general election held five year 
previously, and, as you very well know, the House refused to grant an inves 
tigation of so extended a character, and concerning matters which might ver 
well have formed the subject of election petitions in the several constituencie 
mentioned if such petitions had been made in due time, and which actually 
did form the subject of election petitions in some of them. It was omitte( 
by Mr. Bowell in his amendment to your motion, and omitted, no doubt, pur 
posely, because the House could not be asked to grant an inquiry upon tha 
charge, as it was asked to do upon the subject and purport of the others. I 
is, however, only necessary to say that the Commission cites verbatim th< 
resolution of the House upon which it was based and does not justify you 
charge of wilful omission. That resolution was debated at great length, a 
you arc well aware, for in the debate you took a prominent part. 

Now, as to your second objection, that said tenth charge contained matte 
prave imporl and should have been referred for investigation, let us for tb 
moment eliminate all that refers to the corrupt use of money in certain name- 
counties for purposes of bribery which, as you know, the House refused t 
investigate, because it was a matter which belonged to the ordinary courts t 
be proceeded upon by election petitions, and not one which would, at tha 
time, affect the rights or privileges of any member of the House, and let u 

18 ' 



Edcrar versus ( laron. 



•■^ 



ask : What remains in said charge? Only the allegation thai sums of money 

obtained out of subsidies, or on the credit of subsidies granted to the Quebec 
and Lake St. John Railway Company, together with other sums obtained from 
Gk>vernmen1 contractors were controlled and (list ributed by the direct authority 
and with the knowledge of Sir Adolphe Caron for electoral corruption. TJiis 
manifestly adds nothing to the previous charges except the general allegations, 
that money to an amount not stated, had been contributed by persons not 
named, or otherwise identified, and this money also had been corruptly used 
by Sir Adolphe Caron. If you knew the persons from whom such other 
monies had been obtained, you had an opportunity to mention them, or other- 
wise render identification possible. If you did not know it is difficult to see 
how you could justify the general charge, if, indeed, it was really intended to 
add anything to those preceding it. We should suppose that you could not 
expect an inquiry to be granted on so vague an allegation. 

You, of course, are familiar with the practice of the courts in cases where 
vague and general charges are made. The person promoting them is obliged 
to particularize or to have his charge struck out, as giving no fair notice to 
the opposite party of the nature and scope of the accusation. 

Coming to the third objection, it is manifest by reading the commission, 
that in so far as it refers to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway it is 
founded upon a misquotation of the language of the commission. By looking 
at your charges as recited in the resolution wbich is set forth in the commis- 
sion we find that in your first charge you state the amount of subsidies that 
had been granted and paid by the Dominion of Canada to the Quebec and 
Lake St. John Railway Company ; in your second you allege that arrange- 
ments were made by the Railroad Company whereby the expenditure of such 
subsidies should be made by a construction company, through or in conjunc- 
tion with II. J. Beemer, a contractor, and that the said Beemer and those 
who assisted him in financing for the said railway works received the benefit 
of said subsidies. Then follow Nos. 3 and 4 referring to Sir Adolphe's posi- 
tion in the Government, and his means of knowledge of the dealings with the 
subsidies by the parties receiving them. Then follow Nos. 5 and 6 which 
allege that Sir A. P. Caron corruptly received large sums of money out of said 
subsidies or from money raised on their own credit from persons beneficially 
interested in them ; and further that large sums of money were contributed 
for corrupt election purposes out of said subsidies at the request of Sir A. P. 
Caron. 

The charges as set forth in the reference follow yours in alleging the 
granting the subsidies, and the position of Sir A. P. Caron in the Government, 
and by the third charge proceed as follows. " That during the said period 
and while the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company was being con- 
i structed in part by means of said subsidies the said Sir A. P. Caron knowingly 
aided and participated in diverting said subssdies from the purposes for which 
they had been granted by receiving (for election purposes from the said rail- 
way company) or from a construction company, formed for the construction of 
the said railway, or from one H. J. Beemer, a manager thereof, or contractor 
of the said railway, large sums of money out of the said subsidies, and out of 
moneys raised upon the credit of the same ; and also during the said period 
did further knowingly so aid and participate, by obtaining from the said com- 
panies, or one of them, the payment out of said subsidies and out of monies 
raised by the said companies, or one of them, on the credit of the same, large 
sums of money for election purposes, and to aid in the elections to the 

. 19 
27—21 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 

tl ouse of Commons of the said Sir Adolphe P. Caron and other members and 
supporters of the Government of which he was a member. 

" That after some of the last mentioned payments were so obtained and 
made, the said Sir A. P. Caron, in consideration thereof, corruptly aided and 
assisted said companies to obtain other and further subsidies from the Dom- 
inion Parliament." 

In your letter you state your objection on this head as follows : — "It will 
be observed that in each of my charges 5, 6, 8 and 9, I charged Sir A. P. 
Caron with corruptly receiving money from persons who were beneficially 
interested in said subsidies. This charge has been absolutely eliminated from 
all parts of the reference to the Commissioners, and yet it cannot be denied 
that it is one of the gravest character. To make up apparently for this omis-i 
sion an entirely new charge or series of charges may be found in Mr. Bowell's; 
statement which is referred to you for inquiry. In Mr. Bowell's charge three 
(3), referring to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, it is alleged! 
that Sir A.' P. Caron received large sums of money for election purposes from! 
said railway company or from a construction company formed for the construc- 
tion of said railway." 

You will perceive upon examination that you have omitted from your 
citation from charge three (3) of the reference, the following words : — " Or 
from one H. J. Beemer as manager thereof, or contractor of the said railway."! 
You have apparently overlooked your own second charge in which you des- 
cribe the parties who were interested in said subsidies as follows :— " Arrange-i 
ments were entered into by said railway company whereby the expenditure' 
of said subsidies was made by construction company, through or in conjunc- 
tion with one H. J. Beemer a contractor, and the said H. J. Beemer and those; 
who assisted him in financing for the said railway works received the benefilj 
of the said subsidies." 

The Commission, as you will perceive, though not making use of the exacij 
words used by you, varies your charge by specifically inserting the name o: 
the person whom you declare (as indeed the proof is) have been beneficially 
interested in the subsidies, and by omitting the general word upon which you 
lay so much stress " persons beneficially interested in the subsidies." I refeJ 
you again to the principles which regulate every fairly conducted enquiry and 
which require that an accuser shall give fair notice to the opposite party o 
the names of those in relation to whom he is accused of wrong-doing. 

You will thus see that in the case of the Quebec and Lake St. John Raili 
way Company, at least, the Commission specifically directs inquiry into ami 
corrupt dealing with the subsidies granted to said railways by Sir Adolptoj 
Caron, in conjunction, not only with the company itself, but also with all thos-J 
who became entitled to handle said subsidies before they were expended ill 
the actual construction of the road, or, to use your own phrase, with all thos< 
•' who were beneficially interested therein." 

With reference to the Temiscouata Eailway Company it is to be noted 
thai you do not specify, as you did in the other case, the persons who wen 
beneficially interested in the railway, but you content yourself with gener 
language, viz.: "The persons who from time to time controlled the Temiscouat 
Railway Company and the said subsidies, or who were beneficially intereste 
in the said subsidies." This difference of expression on your part may ver 
probably be explained by the fact that you knew (as you might easily hav 
known by consulting public documents in the Railway Department, and th 
sessional papers, and as the Government well knew), that the said railwa 

20 , 



Edffar versus Caron. 



i e 



company at all times controlled said subsidies and received them personally 
from the Government. The evidence taken shows that the company contracted 
with the linn of McDonald & Bosvvell lor (he construction of the work, but 
the consideration of that contract was the transfer of all the assets of the 
company, including the capital stock, to said McDonald & Boswell, so that the 
latter became really the Temiscouata Railway Company although they kept 
their construction account in the names of McDonald & Boswell. 

We cannot think that under the circumstances above stated you could 
seriously contend that the omission of the names "McDonald & Boswell" from 
the reference, or the omission of the general language used by you above 
recited could have rendered irrelevant evidence offered of the dealing with 
said subsidies by McDonald & Boswell, in conjunction with Sir Adolphe Caron 
for corrupt purposes. Such an objection was indeed made on the part of Sir 
Adolphe Caron, but it was set aside as unfounded by the Commission. 

But even if such evidence were irrelevant under the fifth of the reference, 
I would it not be relevant under the seventh which reads as follows : " That the 
said Sir A. P. Caron misappropriated public money for the purpose of corrupt- 
ing the electors of Canada, to wit, a portion of the monies voted as subsidies 
as hereinbefore stated." You say that Sir A. P. Caron either personally 
received, from persons beneficially interested in the subsidies granted by 
Parliament to the Temiscouata Railway Company, or that upon his request or 
with his kuowledge such persons contributed large sums of money out of said 
subsidies to aid supporters of the Government in the elections. We have but 
to ask you whether such acts would constitute a misappropriation of public 
money on the part of Sir A. P. Caron ? If they would, it is specially charged 
in clause No. seven (7) of the reference. If they would not, why do you 
complain of their omission from charges which you have repeatedly declared 
to be charges of misappropriation of public money ? 

Then follow the 8th, 9th and 10th clauses, which vary the statement of 
the accusation against Sir A. P. Caron as to make every fact which would 
tend to show corrupt dealing with the subsidies referred to by him, either 
alone or in conjunction with others, admissible in evidence. 

We cannot help thinking, if you will allow us to say so, that it was the 
existence of these more serious charges, which, while containing all that you 
had alleged, went so far beyond your accusation, that you shrank from even 
appearing to support them, combined with what we think was a mistake as to 
the nature of your responsibility in connection with the result of the Commis- 
sion, which chiefly decided you to decline our request for your assistance. 

We have however placed before the Commission fully and fairly all the 
evidence relevant to the inquiry. We have called all the witnesses whom you, 
mentioned as being likely to give evidence in the matter, together with others, 
who, during the course of the investigation, it seemed proper to examine. 

We have asked the Commission to adjourn and to meet again on a day 
to be fixed, to formally close their labours, and, although the adduction of 
evidence is understood to have been closed, still if you request it and give us 
satisfactory reasons to believe that any other witnesses you may now wish to 
name can give important evidence relevant to the inquiry, we shall apply for 
a re-opening of the proceedings for the purpose of hearing such witnesses. We 
enclose a copy of the depositions taken. 

We are vour obedient servants, 

J. S. ARCHIBALD, 
F. J. BISAILLON. 
21 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893! 

2T. B — The 19th of November instant has been fixed for the meeting otj 
the Commissioners above mentioned. 

J. S. A. 
F. J. B. 

The foregoing is a duplicate ot a letter mailed at Montreal to James 1). 

Edgar, Q.C., M.P., Toronto, on the 14th day of November instant. 

Montreal, 15th November, 1892. 

J. S. ARCHIBALD, 
F. J. BISAILLON, 



Toronto, 16th November, 18^2. 
To 

J. S. Archibald, Esq., Q.C. and 
F. J. Bisaillon, Esq., Q.C. 

Re Caron Charges. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
dated 9th instant, but which only left Montreal on the 14th and was received 
by me yesterday. I have not yet had time to peruse with care the bulky 
volume containing four hundred pages of evidence which }^ou forwarded to 
me on the same day ; and moreover it would be premature of me to enter 
upon criticism of the course of Counsel for the Crown, or of the rulings of 
the Commissioners, until the proceedings are reported to the House of 
Commons. You quote from your letter of the 5th September last, in which 
you offer to place your professional services at my disposal to enable me to 
substantiate the charges to be investigated by the Royal Commission. I gave 
my reasons for not complying with the invitation by enclosing a copy of my 
letter to the Commissioners, dated 13th September, and I need not repeat 
them now. I will only say that my general view, to which I still adhere, 
was, that some very important charges were wholly omitted from those 
referred to the Commission, while others were garbled beyond recognition. 

For reasons at which I can only guess, no reply whatever was vouched 
to this letter. As to whether my views were concurred in by either the 
Commissioners or the Counsel for the Crown, I was allowed to remain com- 
pletely in the dark until yesterday, when all too late in the day, you dispute 
some of my positions, and say that the Bowell charges were even broader 
than my own. Why you did not announce these to be the views of the 
Commissioners and yourselves until the material witnesses had all been 
examined and dismissed, you do not attempt to explain. 

I confess to unqualified surprise at your statements that Mr. Bowell's 
charges were more serious than mine, that they contained all that I had 
alleged, and thai they went so far beyond my accusations that I shrank from 
even appearing to support them. I fear that your enthusiasm over your briefs 
has somewhat affected your imaginations, for it can scarcely be believed that 
Sit- A.doiphe ( laron's colleagues intended their charges to be more serious, or! 
theh accusations against him to be more severe than mine. To state such aj 
proposition is to refute it. 

If, however, the proceedings under the Commission shall show that a 
broader interpretation of some of the charges before them was given than I 
had supposed would have been warranted by their language, I will frankly 



Edgar versus Caron. 

acknowledge it. It seems to be very deplorable that so many alterations were 
made by Mr. Bowell in his revision of my accusations as not only to have led 
myself but the public press and (as you stale) Sir Adolphe Caron's lawyers, 
to the conclusion that there were essential and intentional differences in the 
meaning of the two sets of charges. 

Again, although you received in the middle of September, and before a 

single witness had been called, my letter to the Commissioners fully stating 

niv doubts as to the admission by them of evidence which I might produce in 

Bupport of my original charges, it is not until every one of the witnesses I have 

named have been examined that I have received the slightest intimation from 

either yourselves or the Commissioners that any such evidence would be 

| admitted. Without a wish to impute improper motives to any one, I cannot 

! help feeling that those who are uncharitably disposed may be inclined to doubt 

rhe frankness of your silence on this point — a silence that was carefully main- 

i tained until every one of these witnesses had been examined. When that safe 

, stage has been reached, I am told that the enquiry has a wider scope than 

I was supposed, and I am now asked if I have any other witnesses to name. It 

• seems to me that even the tactical advantage of this step of yours is doubtful, 

i because it so manifestly comes too late. I may add that I am not at present 

aware of any material witnesses in support of my original charges beyond 

those named in my letter of 13th September last. 

I. gather from the hasty glance I have been able to give the evidence that 
even the restricted nature of the inquiry, and the unprecedented circumstances 
! surrounding it did not prevent some startling revelations of a portion of the 
facts upon which my charges were based. For these exposures you are entirely 
indebted to the list that I gave of witnesses whom I would have called in sup- 
port of my original charges. After I had furnished that list it would have 
been impossible for you, (even if you had so desired) to refrain from calling 
them. 

When even the imperfect evidence elicited shall be made public, no one 
will be at a loss to perceive why party political exigencies required that I 
should have been refused an investigating committee of the House of Commons. 
I am much mistaken if an aroused and indignant public opinion will not insist 
that the full, fair, and open inquir}^ which I demanded from my place in 
Parliament shall be granted next Session, and the partial disclosures made 
shall be probed to the bottom. 

I have the honour to be, gentlemen, 
Your obedient servant, 

J. D. EDGAR. 



Montreal, Que,, 19th Nov., 1892. 

James D. Edgar, Esq., Q.C., M.P., 
Toronto. 

JRc Caron Charges. 

Sik, — Your letter dated the 16th inst. reached us yesterday. 

We note the following statement in your letter : u I may add that I am 
not at present aware of any material witnesses in support of my original 
charges beyond those named in my letter of 13th September last." We 

23 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893; 

must convey to you our thanks for this admission because it leaves no doubi 
that the Commission has exhausted every source of information. 

You do not controvert the soundness of the arguments of our letter of th ei 
9th inst. with regard to the scope of the inquiry further than by what may 
be called an argument urn ad absurdum which you state as follows : "I confes^ 
to unqualified surprise at your statements that Mr. BowelPs charges were 
more serious than mine: that they contained all that I had alleged, and thai! 
they went so far beyond my accusations that I shrank from even appearing to 
support them. I fear that your enthusiasm over your briefs has somewhat! 
affected your imagination, for it can scarcely be believed that Sir Adolphe's 
colleagues intended their charges to be more serious or their accusation?! 
against him to be more severe than mine." 

You assume that we had asserted that Mr. Bowell and the members oi 
the Government, colleagues of Sir Adolphe Caron, had made charges against 
him, and that these were more grave than those made by you. This.assumpl 
tion is altogether erroneous. The language of our letter to you on the .poimi 
is as follows : — 

a The charges as we view them are formulated by the House -on its own 
responsibility as being in effect and substance charges which were made in thej 
House. They were based, it is true, chiefly upon statements made by you,' j 
etc. We then proceeded to point out (as the Commission itself always does), 
that your original charges were amplified in debate by you and other members 
of the House, and that the reference was so drawn as to include all that had 
been originally charged (with the exception of your tenth charge), and also all 
that was alleged to be the meaning of said charges by yourself, Sir Richard 
Cartwright and Honourable David Mills in the course of said debate, and thai 
the interpretation of your charges by the gentlemen named gave to them a 
graver import than their language implied. Neither did Hon. Mr. Bowell.i 
nor did any member of the Government make any charges against Sir Adolphq 
Caron ; but finding certain charges publicly made in the House against him. 
they proposed to the House to cause them to be investigated by Royal Com-' 
mission. 

The remainder of your letter is taken up by a complaint that neither W€ 
nor the Commissioners had intimated to you that the scope of the investi! 
gation was broader than you had supposed, until all the material witnesses 
had been examined. 

This is, we think, a peculiar complaint to come from you, a leading andl 

rienced barrister, a member of the House of Commons, who took ad 
active part in the debate upon the resolution of the House upon which tl i< 
Commission was founded. If your real reason for not taking part in the 
investigation as you were invited to do, was that you doubted whether the 
evidence would be permitted to travel over ground deemed essential by you 
why did you not present yourself and test the judgment of the Commission 

ipon the point? It would have been quite competent for you to hav< 
retired when you found yourself unduly restricted. 

Yon were requested by Mr. Archibald's letter of the 9th September, tc| 
appear al the investigation, and assist its work. He offered you his pre 
istance for that purpose. You not only declined to assist, bin 
stated that your self respect would be compromised by doing so. You di ^ 
not address your letter, stating your reasons for declining, to Mr. Archibald 
bu1 you addressed it to the Commissioners themselves, where it would becom 
pari of their record, sending at the same time a copy to Mr. Archibald. 

24 



Edffar versus Caron. 



k © 



Now you complain that neither we nor the Commissioners informed you 

\ ou were in error as to scope of the inquiry, until all the material wit- 

s had been examined, and you suggest want of frankness on our part. 
hall not suggest want of sincerity on yours. 

We cannot suppose that you expected the Commissioners to enter into a 
jorr^spondence with you as to what judgment they would give upon the 
admission of certain kinds of evidence. That would be contrary to their duty 
as judges. 

Did you then expect the Counsel for the Crown, to whom you had not 
addressed your communication of the 13th Sept., to place his opinion against 
yours so positively expressed, and to beg you again to assist in an inquiry in 
in which you alleged your self respect would be compromised ? You relied 
upon your own judgment as to the point in question. You declined Mr. 
Archibald's offer of professional assistance, and you could not reasonably 
expect that it would be renewed. 

We thank you for the indirect assistance given to us in making public 
the names of the persons whom you expected would give material evidence. 
|When we had examined them all, in order to take every means of making the 
enquiry as thorough as possible, we decided to write to you to ascertain 
whether you knew of any other persons who ought to be examined. We did 
not ask you in any way to depart from your previous course of non-interven- 
tion, but only to do what you had previously done, make public the names of 
all witnesses known to you. We desired to put on record a reply to your 
letter of 13th Sept., (a right which you would surely not deny us) and we 
availed ourselves of the occasion to communicate such reply to you. 

We shall not follow you into your suggestions of want of frankness and 
bad faith on our part. These may very well be left to be determined by the 
public judgment founded upon the work which we have done. 

We are your obedient servants, 

J. S. ARCHIBALD. 

F. J. BISAILLON. 



I do swear that I will truly and faithfully, to the utmost of my abilities, 
execute the office and duties of Royal Commissioner named by Letters Patent 
of 16th June, 1892, to receive evidence on charges preferred against the Hon- 
ible Sir A. P. Caron, KC.M.G. So help me God. 

A. B. ROUTHIER. 

'Sworn before me this 7th day of) 
September, 1892, at Quebec. J 

J. H. R. Burroughs, 

Com. per Ded. Pot. 



25 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 

I do swear that I will truly and faithfully, to the utmost of my abilities 
execute the office and duties of .Royal Commissioner named by Letters Paten 
of 16th June, 1892, to receive evidence on charges preferred against the Hon 
ourable Sir A. P. Caron, KC.M.G. So help me God. 

M. M. TAIT. 
Sworn before me this 7th day of 1 , 

September, 1892, at Quebec. J 

J. H. R. Burroughs, 

Com. per Ded. Pot. 



CANADA, ^ 

Province of Quebec, V 

District of Quebec. J 

COMMISSION" OF THE SECRETARY OF THE ROYAL COMMISSION, 

We, the Honourable Adolphe Routhier and Melbourne M. Tait, Judge: 
for the Superior Court for the Province of Quebec, by virtue of the power! 
vested in us in our capacity of Royal Commissioners named by Letters Paten! 
under the great seal of the Dominion of Canada, dated the sixteenth June on| 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two, to take evidence as to the truth oj 
falsity of the charges preferred against the Honourable Sir Adolphe P. Caron! 
K.C.M.G., and report to the Secretary of State for the Dominion of Canaclj 
the evidence taken therein ; do hereby, nominate and appoint Gustave Fan 
bault Hamel, of St. Mary, Beauce, advocate, the clerk and secretary of this com 
mission. 

Given under our seal in the city of Quebec, the sixth day of September 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

A. B. ROUTHIER, 

M. M. TAIT, 

Commissioners. 



CANADA, 

Province of Quebec, 
District of Quebec. 



ROYAL COMMISSION. 



I swear that I will discharge exactly and faithfully, to the best of rii 
capacity, the office of clerk, to which I am appointed by the Royal Commi- 
sion. So help me God. 

GUSTAVE HAMEL. 

iti before me at Quebec, this \ 
7th day of September, 1892. j 

A. B. Routhier, 

Commissioner. 



26 



Edgar versus ( !aft)ft. 



CANADA, 

Province oe Quebec, 
Distrid of Quebec. 



ROYAL COMMISSION. 



I swear to fulfil exactly and faithfully, to the best of my ability, the duties 
iographer to the Royal Commission appointed to take evidence as to 
he truth or falsity of the charges preferred against the Honourable Sir 
\dolphe P. Caron, K.C.M.G., and report them. And so help me God. 



THOMAS P. OWENS. 



•orn before me this 20th day 1 
of September, 1892. / 

A. B. ROUTHIER, 



Royal Commissioner. 



CANADA, ^| 

Province of Quebec, > 
District of Quebec. J 

ROYAL COMMISSION 

I swear to fulfil exactly and faithfully, to the best of my ability, the 
>ffice and duty of stenographer to the Royal Commission appointed to take 
vidence as to the truth or falsehood of the charges made against the Hon- 
orable Sir Adolphe P. Caron, K.C.M.G., and report thereon. So help me God. 

J. 0. MARCEAU. 
5 worn before me this twentieth "I 
clay of September, 1892. / 

A. B. ROUTHIER, 

Royal Commissioner. 



CANADA, 

Province of Quebec, 
District ot Quebec. 



ROYAL COMMISSION. 



I appear on behalf of the Government of Canada, 
Quebec, 8th September, 1892. 

J. S. ARCHIBALD. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189 i 

m THE MATTER OF THE ROYAL COMMISSION. 

. Appointed under the Great Seal of the Dominion of Canada, for the pul 
pose of taking evidence as to the truth or falsity of charges preferred again! 
the Honourable Sir A. P. Caron, KC.M.G. 

FIRST SITTING. 

Thursday, 8th September, 1892. 
The first meeting is held in the Court House, Quebec. 

present : 
The Honourable Adolphe Basile Routhier, 
" Melbourne M. Tait, 

Commissioners. 

The Commissioners take their seats at 11.15 a.m., and announce thatM, 
Gustave F. Ham el, of Quebec, advocate, has been appointed clerk and seer 
tary of the Commissioners. 

The secretary then reads the commission and also the certificate of J. I 
R. Burroughs, Esq., commissioner per dedimus potestatem, stating that 1« 
received the commissioner's oath of office. 

Mr. J. S. Archibald, of Montreal, Q.C., appears on behalf of the Gover 
ment of Canada, and states that he is instructed to act in the case as a Crow 
prosecutor in a certain criminal suit. Mr. E. A. Pentland, Q.C., and Ml 
Charles Fitzpatrick, appear on behalf of Sir A. P. Caron. The commissid 
then adjourns to the 20th inst. the hearing of witnesses. 

SECOND SITTING. 

Tuesday, 20th September, 1892. 
The Commissioners take their seats at 10.30 a.m. 

Honourable Judge Routhier, Chairman of the Commissioners, states th;| 
they have sent a letter to Mr. J. D. Edgar, Member of the House of Commoi 
for West Ontario, notifying him to appear before them, but he hi 
declined to do so, for the reason set forth in a letter now fyled in the record. 

F. J. Bisaillon, Q. C, appears as counsel for the Government. A. Fe; 
guson, Q.C., Ottawa, also appears as leading counsel for Sir A. P. Caron. 

Matthew J. Dickieson, of the city of Ottawa, Chief Accountant of tn 
Finance Department, is then sworn in and examined by Mr. Archibald c 
behalf of the prosecutor and asked to produce all certificates from the Audit* 
General, powers of attorney, cheques and vouchers, relating to the paymei 
of the subsidies granted to the Quebec & Lake St. John Railway and tl 
Temiscouata Railway. 

Application is made by A. Ferguson, Q. C, leading counsel for the defeiu 
on behalf of Sir Adolphe Caron to have a statement made of all these diff 
nut accounts of subsidies paid so as to give them the opportunity of statin 
if they admit these payments and thus avoid a great loss of time. Applicatid 
i- rejected by the Commissioners on the objection raised by Messrs. Archibaij 
and Bisaillon, Q. C, for the Government. The witness is then examined. 

Mr. Archibald on behalf of the prosecution asks that the Commissione 
adjourn until the 21st at 10.30 a. m. The Commission is adjourned accordingly 

28 



Edgar versus ( laron. 



THIRD SITTING. 



Wednesday, 21st September, 1892. 

The Commission take their seats at 10.30 a. m. 

Louis Kossuth Jones, Secretary to the Chief Engineer of the Railway 
►epartment, Ottawa, is then examined and sworn on behalf of the Crown 
5 M. Bisaillon, Q. C, and produces the following documents concerning 

fie Lake St. John and Temiscouata Railway, which are fyled in exhibits 

|>r the Crown. 

At 4 p. m. Commission adjourns to the 22nd September, 1892, at 10.30 a. m. 

FOURTH SITTING. 

Thursday, 22nd September, 1892. 

The Commissioners take their seats at 10.30 a. m. 

Mr. J. G. Scott, Secretary to the Quebec & Lake St. John Railway and 
,ake St. John Construction Company, is then examined by J. S. Archibald, 
J. C, for the Crown and asked to produce all vouchers, documents, papers, 
ontracts, &c, concerning said above companies and having any relation to the 
aid companies, by the Federal Government. 

The examination of Mr. J. G. Scott is continued until adjournment at 
.30 to the 23rd September inst. 

FIFTH SITTING. 

Friday, 23rd September, 1892. 
The Commissioners take their seats at 10.30 a. m. 

Examination of J. G. Scott, Secretary to the Lake St. John Railway 
Company, continued by J. Archibald for the Crown. 

Objection is taken to the evidence of certain payments by way of gift or 
oans by the Quebec & Lake St. John Construction Company to any electoral 
ourposes for the election of Sir Adolphe Caron or his supporters. 

A. Ferguson objects strongly to such evidence on behalf of Sir Adolphe 
Caron, on the ground that it is not coming under the jurisdiction of the Com- 
mission and not within the scope of the inquiry. 

Mr. Charles Fitzpatrick also argues at length the same objection. 

Messrs. Archibald and Bisaillon for the Crown contend that it is within 
(the scope of the inquiry and that they have a right to show that large amounts 
of money were thus paid to the electoral fund by the company to aid the 
election of Sir Adolphe Caron or his supporters coming out of the Dominion 
Government subsidies. 

The Chairman overrules the objection on the ground that their Commis- 
sion gives them the right, to inquire into such dealings as those referred to. 

At 12.30 a. m., Mr. Fitzpatrick counsel for Sir Adolphe Caron, begins 
the cross-examination of the witness. 

At 1 p. m., adjournment until 2 p. m. 

At two p. m., sitting is resumed and cross-examination of J. G. Scott 
continued until 3 p. m. 

Then witness is re-examined until adjournment at 4 p. m., to the next 
morning at 10.30 a. m. 

29 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18! 

SIXTH SITTING. 

Saturday, 24th September, 1892. 
The Commissioners take their seats at 10.30 a. m. 

The following witnesses are called, James Geggie, Frank Eoss, of tl 
city of Quebec, and Henry James Beemer, of the city of Montreal. 

Messrs. Geggie and Beemer are present and the latter is then examine 
by J. S. Archibald, Q. C, for the Crown and asked to produce several docil 
ments concerning his different transactions with the Lake St. John Railw* 
Company and Construction Company. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick on behalf of Sir Adolphe Caron moves for an adjoui 
ment until Thursday the 29th instant, in order to facilitate the production 
said documents by witness. He also asks that only those books and document 
which have some reference to the matters now inquired into, be produced ai 
that for that purpose they be examined by witness before the counsels of bot 
parties and further submitted for approbation to the Commissioners. 

J. S. Archibald, Q. C, for the Crown says he has no objection to su< 
adjournment and the motion is granted. 

The Commission then adjourns till Thursday, 29th September, 1892, 
10.30 a. m. 

SEVENTH SITTING. 

Thursday, 29th September, 1892. 
The Commission take their seats at 10.30 a. m. 

The names of Messrs. Israel Tarte, Thomas McGreevy, Frank Ross, Jam* 
Geggie, Antoine Bonheur, Wm. Dean, Manager of the Quebec Bank, 
H. J. Beemer are called. 

Messrs. Tarte, Beemer and I >ean are present. 

The chairman reads a telegram from Honourable Thomas McGreevjj 
stating that he would be before the Commission the next day, 30th instant. 

H. J. Beemer, of the city of Montreal, contractor for the construction of 
portion of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company is then examine*) 
by J. S. Archibald, Q. C, for the Crown. 

1 1 is examination is interrupted for a few minutes to allow Mr. J. G. Scotij 
Secretary to the Lake St. John Railway Company, to produce certain docvjt 
ments which are filed in the record. 

Mr. Beemer's examination is then continued. The witness being aske 

iv i! he has in his possession accounts of political subscriptions to the elec 
tion of Sir Adolphe Caron or his supporters from 1882 to 1891, and if he di<; 
subscribe to such fund. 

Mr. A. Ferguson, Q.C., on behalf of Sir A. P. Caron, objects to suci 
questions 

Mr. C. Fitzpatrick also argues at length the same objection. 

Mr. Archibald, Q.C., on behalf of the Crown, answers. 

Judge Routhier, Chairman of the Commission, overrules the objection, ! 

Mr. Beemer having answered that he had in his possession an accouu: 
book <>!' monies Bpent for election purposes, is ordered to produce it on motioi 
from Mr. Archibald, Q.C. 

At 4 p.m. witness returns in court without the books, which he could no! 
find, and promises fco produce them the next morning. 

Commission then adjourns until to-morrow, 30th ins't., at 10.30 a.m. . 

30 



Edgar versus Caron. 

EIGHTH SITTING. 

Friday, 30th Sept., 1892. 
Commissioners meet at 10.30 a.m. 

Hon. Geo. Irvine, Q.C., appears on behalf of II. J. Beemer and asks the 

[mission to be allowed to consult with his client before the latter be 
imined any further. Application is granted and Honourable Thomas 
.K'Greevy is then examined by counsel for the Crown. 

In answer to the question asking him to produce all documents, account 
►ooks, &c, in his possession, having reference to the matters enquired into, 
\ itness states that he has no such documents except receipts which he could 
i \i tind but which he would produce as soon as discovered. 

W. R. Dean, manager pro tempore of the Quebec Bank, is afterwards 
xamined by J. S. Archibald, Q.C., and produces a statement or extract from 
|he books of the bank giving the liability of H. J. Beemer with the bank and 
lie late J. S. Ross. 

At 2 p.m. Mr. Beemer's evidence is taken up and continued. Witness 
producing statement asked for by the Crown. 

At 5 p.m. Commission adjourns to next morning at 10.30. 

ninth sitting. 

Saturday, 1st Oct., 1892. 
Commissioners meet at 10.30 a.m. 

Mr. James Geggie is examined by J. S. Archibald, Q.C., and produces 
ilocuments concerning the financial relations between Hon. J. S. Ross and H. 
[T. Beemer, and having reference to political subscriptions from 1882 to 1891. 

Mr. Chs. Fitzpatrick, on behalf of Sir A. P. Caron, cross-examined 
witness. 

Mr. Dean is recalled to produce certain documents. 

Commission adjourns until Tuesday, 4th October, at 10.30 a.m. 

TENTH SITTING. 

Tuesday, 4th October, 1892. 
The Commission take their seats at 10.30 a.m. 

The names of Messrs. J. J. MacDonald, A. R. MacDonald, E. D. Boswell, 
A Grandbois, Thomas McGreevy, Frank Ross, R B. Dumoulin, Israel Tarte, 
Krnest Wurtle ; and then called 

Honourable Thomas McGreevy, is asked by J. S. Archibald, Q. C, on 

•ehalf of the Crown, to produce the papers and documents, which he was 

ordered to produce by the Commissioners when previously examined, and 

that he is unable to do so, having searched for them unsuccessfully, but 

\ ill try and find them, and if so, will produce them on Friday. 

The Chairman reminds witness that the next time he comes back before 
he Commissioners he must be in a position to state whether or not he has lost 
*uch papers. 

The examination of Ernest Wurtle, of the city of Quebec, accountant of 
Mr. Beemer, is then taken up. 

Mr. Archibald then declares that he has finished for the moment with 
the enquiry concerning the Lake St. John Railway matter and will now 
examine witness in reference to the Temiscouata Railway subsidies. 

31 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18! 

A. R. Macdonald, Superintendent of the Quebec Division of the Interc] 
lonial Railway Co., is then examined by Mr. Bissaillon, Q.C., on behalf of tl 
Crown. 

Mr. Bisaillon, for the Crown, moves that when the Commission adjoui 
it stands adjourned until Tuesday next so as to allow him to have witness* 
summoned, and read a rule ordered against them in case of refusal to atten( 
By Mr. A. R. Macdonald's evidence, it appears that his is only incidental 
that of Messrs J. J. McDonald and E. D. Boswell, who are really the mo,j 
important witnesses in this matter of the Temiscouata Railway, being 
possession of all the papers and documents belonging to the Company. 

His Honour Judge Tait, Commissioner, complains of the loss of til 
resulting from these repeated adjournments, drawing the Counsel for 
Crown's attention to the fact that the subpoena to the last mentioned witnes 
had not been sent in time. As far as he is concerned he is not disposed 
grant any further adjournment after this last one. 

J. S. Archibald, Q. C, on behalf of the Crown, states that he has act 
with all possible diligence, and cannot be held responsible for the noi 
appearance of Messrs. McDonald and Boswell, these gentlemen having h 
their domicile some days ago. Of course the Commissioners are aware tl 
the prosecution have worked in the dark to a certain extent. 

Dr. Grandbois, M. P. for the County of Temiscouata, is then examine 
by Mr. Bisaillon, and subsequently cross examined by Mr. Ferguson, Q. (| 

The Commissioners adjourn at 4 p. m. until Tuesday the 11th instant, 
10.30 a. m. 

ELEVENTH SITTING. 

Tuesday, 11th October, 1892. 

The Chairman of the Commission, Honourable Mr. Routhier, adjoui 
the Commission until Tuesday the 18th October instant, because of the n< 
appearance of the necessary witnesses. 

TWELFTH SITTING. 

Tuesday, 18th October, 1892. 

Honourable A. B. Routhier, Chairman of the Commission, takes 
seat at 10.30 a. m., and states that the Commission will remain adjoun 
until Tuesday, the 26th instant, 

The attornies for the defence, Mr. Ferguson and Mr. Fitzpatrick, bei 
unable to attend before that date. 

THIRTEENTH SITTING. 

Wednesday, 26th October, 1892. 
Commissioners meet at 10.30 a. m. 

1 1 onourable Thomas McGreevy reappears and is asked by J. S. Archibald 
Q.O., for tin- Crown, to produce the papers, orders, etc., which he was ordere( 
to ). rot luce, but only agrees to read them and have copies taken by th* 
stenographers. Ee is then examined, de novo, in relation to these document: 
and cross-examined by Mr. Pentland on behalf of Sir Adolphe Caron. 

John J. McDonald, railway contractor, is then examined by J. S. Archi 
bald, Q.O., for the Crown. Is a member of the firm of McDonald & Boswell 
and lives in River <lu Loup. 

32 



Edaur versus ( 'aron. 



*o 



During his examination, witness is asked to say if one of the considers 
ions of the transfer made to McDonald & Boswell by the Temiscouata Railway 
Jompany was that the said McDonald & Boswell would subscribe money to 

-lection of Sir Adolphe Oaron or any of his supporters. 

An objection is raised by A. Ferguson on behalf of Sir A. P. Caron. 

Judge Routhier, Chairman of the Commissioners, overrules the objection, 
aying that the question is only preliminary, and it will remain for the Crown 
i prove some connection between Sir A. P. Caron and the obtaining of the 
\ from the contractors. 

E. D. Boswell, of the firm of McDonald & Boswell, is then examined. 

Commission adjourns at 4 p.m. until to-morrow, Thursday, 27th October. 

FOURTEENTH SITTING. 

Commissioners meet at 10.30 a.m. 

E. D. Boswell continues his evidence until 12 m., when P. B. Dumoulin, 
manager of the Quebec branch of La Banque du Peuple, is also examined by 
| he Crown and asked to produce the books of deposit, or of account, of Sir A. 
?. Caron from 1882 to 1891, in said bank, and states that to his knowledge 
Sir A. P. Caron never had any account at his bank during that period. 

The Commissioners adjourn until 2 p.m. 

F. Ross is examined by the Crown and states he has no knowledge what- 
ever of anything connected with this enquiry. 

"W. R. Dean, of the Quebec bank, is examined, de novo, by J. S. Archibald, 
;md cross-examined by Mr. Ferguson on behalf of Sir A. P. Caron. 

A. R. McDonald is examined also, de novo, in relation to certain 
igreements referred to by J. J. McDonald in his examination in relation 
to the Temiscouata Railway Company transfer to McDonald & Boswell, to the 
effect that subscriptions to the electoral fund were then mentioned, and states 
j'hat such is not the case. He further argues that he does not know what has 
oecome of the $25,000 subsidy of the town of Fraserville to said Railway Com- 
pany, as J. J. McDonald has never thought proper to account to him. 

Israel Tarte, of the city of Montreal, journalist, shareholder of the Temis- 
couata Railway Company, and still one of its directors, is then examined by 
phe Crown through J. S. Archibald, Q.C. 

This closes the evidence on behalf of the Crown. 

J. A. Ferguson, on behalf of Sir A. P. Caron, asks that he be allowed to 
examine his client, and is permitted to do so. 

Sir Adolphe P. Caron, Postmaster-General of Canada and Privy Councillor 
:>f Her Majesty for Canada, is then examined, and gives his story of his con- 
nection with the Lake St. John and Temiscouata Railway Companies. 

He is subsequently cross-examined by J. S. Archibald, Q.C. 

Evidence is declared to be closed on both sides, and Commission adjourns 
to report. 

FIFTEENTH SITTING. 

V 

Saturday, 19th November, 1892. 

Commissioners meet at 10.30 a.m. 

Mr. Archibald, Q.C, on behalf of the Crown, states that he has sent Mr. 
[Edgar, M.P. for the West Riding of Ontario, copy ot the evidence and a letter 
itiled in the record on the 16th instant, requesting him to say whether he had 

33 
27—3 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18 



any more witnesses k> suggest, and if so that they might be examined. H; 
also states that an answer was also received, which is produced and filed. 

Mr. Bisaillon, Q.C., for the Crown, and C. Pentland, on behalf of Sir A 
P. Caron, are present in court. 

Commissioners then adjourn to report. 
Certified correct. 

GUSTAVE HAMEL, 

Clerk E. C. 



34 



Edgar versus ( Jaron. 



LIST OF WITNESSES EXAMIJS'KD. 



1892. 

Sept. 20th. — Matthew G. Dickieson, Chief Accountant of Finance De- 
partment, Ottawa. 
" 21st. — Louis Kossuth Jones, Secretary to the Chief Engineer of 

Railway Department, Ottawa. 
" 22nd. — J. G. Scott, Secretary of the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway and Lumbering and Trading Company, Quebec. 
" 24th. — Horace James Beemer, railway contractor, Montreal. 
" 29th do do denovo. 

" 30th. — James Scott, de novo. 
" 30th. — H. J. Beemek, de novo. 
" 30th. — Hon. Thomas McGreevy, Quebec. 

" 30th. — William R. Dean, Manager ad interim of the Quebec Bank, 
Quebec. 
Oct. 1st. — James Geggie, of the City of Quebec. 
" 4th. — Hon. Thomas McGreevy, de novo. 
" 4th. — Ernest Wurtele, of the City of Quebec. 

" 4th. — A. R. McDonald, Superintendent of Quebec Division Inter- 
colonial Railway, Granville. 
" 4th. — Dr. Grandbois, M.P., Fraserville, P.Q. 
'• 26th. — Hon. Thomas McGreevy, de novo. 
" 26th. — John J. McDonald, railway contractor, Fraserville. 
" 26th.— E. I). Boswell, of the firm of McDonald & Boswell, Fraserville. 
" 27th.— do do do 

" 27th. — P. B. Dumoulin, Manager of La Banque du Peuple, Quebec. 
" 27th. — Frank Ross, Quebec. 
" 27th.— W. R. Dean, de novo. 
" 27th. — A. R. McDonald, de novo. 
" 27th. — J. Israel Tarte, journalist, Montreal. 
* c 27th. — Sir A. P. Caron, KC.M.G., Postmaster-General of Canada. 



35 



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Sessional Papers (No. 27.) 



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Sessional Papers (No. 27.) 



A. 189: 




52 



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Sessional Papers (No. 27.) 



A. 18! 



^3 
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versus Caron. 






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5G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 27.) 



A. 189: 




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■/..- 


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Edgar versus Caron. 





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Edgar versus ( ';iron. 



EVIDENCE 



Quebec, 20th September, 1892. 

The Royal Commission to enquire as to the truth or falsity of certain 
charges made against the Honourable Sir Adolphe R Caron, Member of the 
House of Commons and Government of Canada, and one of Her Majesty's 
Privy Councillors for the Dominion of Canada, met at the City of Quebec this 
morning for the purpose of taking evidence in reference to such charges. 

Present : — The Honourable Basile Routhier, and The Honourable Mel- 
bourne M. Tait, Commissioners. 

Mr. J. S. Archibald, Q. C, and Mr. Bisaillon, Q. C, appeared for the 
Crown. 

Mr. Ferguson, Q. C, Mr. Fitzpatrick, Q. C, and Mr. Pentland, Q. C, 
appeared for the Honourable Sir A. P. Caron, who was also present in person. 

Matthew G. Dickieson, Chief Clerk of the Department of Finance, 
Ottawa, aged forty three (43) years, being duly sworn, deposed as follows : — 

Examined by Mr. Archibald, Q.C. — 

Q. — Mr. Dickieson, are you in possession of the warrants and cheques and 
certificates relating to the payment of the subsidies granted to the Quebec and 
Lake St. John Railway Company ? — A. I am. 

Q. These are the original documents in the Department of Finance? — 
A. Yes, sir. 

Q. You have also the same documents which relate to the payment of the 
subsidies to the Temiscouata Railway ? — A. Yes, sir. 

Q. These I presume are documents which belong to the Department ? — 
A. They belong to the Department. 

Q. You are prepared, I presume, to allow copies of them to be taken ? — 
A. Oh, yes. 

Q. Will you now produce these documents, first beginning with the 
Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company ; will you please just state what 
is the general nature of these documents which you are producing ? — A. I 
produce the certificates ; we call them certificates, they are the authorization 
for the cheques. 

Q. The certificates are the authorization ; whose authorization ? — A. They 
are the authorization of the Attorney General. 

Q. Perhaps you had better explain the manner in which these payments 
are made, the necessary proceedings to obtain payment of a subsidy ? — A. To 
explain one will explain all. The process is by the Audit Act. When an 
application is made by a Department for a certain payment to be made. 

Q. When you say the Department, you mean the Department affected 
by the payment? — A. Yes, the Department, in this case, of Railways and 
Canals. The Auditor, being satisfied that the payment should be made, issues 
this certificate ; the wording of the whole of them is about the same. It 

HI 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189a 

• 
-states in the first place what the money is for. This first one is for a subsidj 
for ten (10) miles, of three thousand two hundred dollars ($3,200.00) per mild 
making thirty two thousand dollars. The Auditor then certifies that th 
cheque may issue and signs it, sending this to the Finance Department. Thj 
cheque is made out in the Finance Department, signed by the Deputy d 
Finance, or an Officer acting for him, and sent back to the Auditor General) 
who also signs it or an officer for him. The cheque is then- handed to thi 
party entitled to receive it, if he is present, or sent to the Department, bj 
whom it is sent to the person in whose favour it is drawn. For instance, thi] 
first cheque. 

Q. Is that the first cheque in point of time that you have referring tj 
this matter? — A. Yes, that is the first cheque issued. I now produce thi] 
first cheque dated the seventeenth day of November, one thousand eight hun! 
dred and eighty three, it is for twenty four thousand three hundred and fiftj 
five dollars and fifty five cents ($24,355.55). That was in part payment of thj 
thirty two thousand dollars ($32,000.00). From the document before me 
understand that there was at that time the balance between the twenty fou: 
thousand dollars ($24,000.00) and thirty two thousand dollars ($32,000.00) du< 
to the Customs Department, and an entry was made debiting the Lake St 
John subsidy and crediting the Customs. We did not pay the whole thirty 
two thousand dollars ($32,000.00) in cash, but the seven thousand dollar: 
($7,000.00) was taken in payment of the Customs. 

Q. So that that cheque really represents a payment by the Governmen 
of thirty two thousand dollars ? — A. Yes, sir. 

The witness produces the cheque with certificate attached and files it as 
exhibit (D 1) at enquete. 

Q. Now, the second cheque ? — A. The second cheque is dated the fifth 
day of May, one thousand eight hundred and eighty five. It was paid to th( 
Bank of Montreal under a power of attorney for the Quebec & Lake St. Johr 
Railway, and the amount is thirty-seven thousand and twenty-seven dollar* 
($37,027.00). 

Q. Does the certificate show what it is for ? — A. It is a subsidy to the 
Quebec & Lake St. John Railway. 

Q. Does this indicate on what particular portion of that Railway ; is iti 
the first, or second, or third ten miles ? — A. The certificate does not say. It! 
was issued on the authority of a report of the Chief Engineer dated on the! 
8th day of April, 1885, and there is an Order in Council of the twentysecond 
day of April, 1885. 

Q. You say that this was paid to the Bank of Montreal under power of 
attorney ; are you in possession of that power of attorney ? — A. The power 
of attorney is here. 

Q. Is the power of attorney attached to the cheque ? — A. Yes. 

The witness produces the cheque together with the power of attorney 1 
x hi hit (1) 2) at enquete. 

Q. Now, with regard to the third cheque ? — A. The third cheque wasi 
issued on the twenty second day of September, one thousand eight hundred' 
and eighty five (1885). It is payable to the Quebec Bank. The previous 
power of attorney has been rescinded and a second one to the Quebec Bank! 
substituted. The amount is thirty-eight thousand three hundred and seventy- 
five dollars ($38,375.00). 

Q. [s there any certificate or any special information on the certificate 
concerning it?— A. The authority is a letter from the Chief Engineer of the 

62 




Eclair versus Caron. 

th day of September, and an Order in Council of the fifteenth day of Sep- 
ember, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five (1885). 

Q. And simply "specifies that it is for the Quebec & Lake St. John liail- 

? —A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Have you any special document which cancels the previous power of 
ittorney to the Bank of Montreal? - A. No, I have not. 

The witness produces cheque and power of attorney to the Quebec Bank 
\hibit (D 3) at enquete. 

Q. Now, the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is for twenty-seven 
housand eight hundred and forty dollars ($27,840.00). It is dated on the 
j.iineteenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five 
85). 

Q. To whom is that cheque made payable? — A. It is payable to the 
(Quebec Bank. This certificate contains a little more than any of the others. 
; I says "subsidy due on fourth ten mile section," and it is by Order in Council 
pf the sixteenth day of November. 

Q. Does it say the total amount of the subsidy ; it does not seem to be the 
jtotal amount of the subsidy that would be due ; is there any further explana- 
tion ? — A. There is no explanation. 

The witness produces the cheque and certificate as exhibit (D 4) at 
jenquete. 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is a payment of 
jtwenty-four thousand five hundred and thirty-two dollars ($24,532.00), also to 
jthe Quebec Bank. The cheque is dated on the twentieth day of January, one 
(thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886) and is authorized by an Order 
iin Council on the eighteenth day of January. It is between the fortieth and 
| fiftieth mile. 

The witness produces the certificate and cheque as exhibit (D 5) at 
| enquete. 

Q. What about the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is dated on the 
twenty second day of February, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six 
|(1886). It is for ninety-six thousand dollars ($96,000.00) to the order of the 
i Quebec Bank for the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, and is 
; authorized by an Order in Council on the seventeenth day of February. 

The witness produces cheque and certificate, which is filed as exhibit 
(D 6) at enquete. 

Q. By the way, the Quebec Bank referred to, is that the Quebec Bank 
having an Ottawa branch? — A. Yes, sir. When the Quebec Bank is referred 
to it is paid always to the Ottawa branch of the bank. The next cheque is 
for six thousand dollars ($6,000.00), on the twenty-second day of July, one 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886). It is authorized by Order in 
i Council of the thirteenth day of said July. 

Q. Paid to the Quebec Bank likewise ? — A. Paid to the Quebec Bank 
likewise. 

The witness produces the cheque and certificate attached which is filed as 
exhibit (D 7) enquete. 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is for eighty-three 
thousand six hundred and eighty-eight dollars ($83,688.00). It is dated the 
ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
and eighty-six (1886), and it is authorized by an Order in Council of the 
twenty-ninth day of September, 1886. 

63 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18&j 

Q. And likewise paid to the Quebec Bank ? — A. Likewise paid to thj ! 
Quebec Bank. 

The witness produces the cheque and certificate as exhibit (D 8) enquefr n 

Q. "What about the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is for thre!' 
thousand three hundred and ten dollars ($3,310.00), and is dated the thirteenth 
day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred ana' 
eighty-six (1886) and is authorized by Order in Council of the seventh of sai<| 
December. 

Q. Also paid to the Quebec Bank ? — A. Also paid to the Quebec Bank 

The witness produces the cheque and certificate which is filed as exhibii 
(D 9) at enquete. 

Q. "What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is for forty eighi 
thousand seven hundred and forty-seven dollars ($48,747.00) in favour of thj 
Quebec Bank, dated on the twenty-third day of December, in the year on>j 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886) and authorized by Order hi 
Council of the seventeenth day of said December. 

"Witness produces cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D 10). 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is dated on th< 
fifteenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seveij 
(1887), for sixty thousand four hundred and seventy-four dollars ($60,474,001 
in favour of the Quebec Bank. 

"Witness produces the cheque and certificate which is filed as (D 11) a] 
enquete. 

Q. Are these all signed in the same way ? — A. They are all signed ; the^| 
are all signed or receipted by the officer of the Bank; the first one is receiptee 
by the Secretary-Treasurer of the Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Comi 
pany. 

Q. And the certificates of the Auditor-General bearing the receipts ol! 
the payee ? — A. Yes, sir. 

Q. All the documents that you have produced, in the right hand columr 
bear the receipt of the payee of the cheque ? — Yes, that is the signature oi 
Mr. Noel of the Quebec Bank. In the first certificate or two the receipt is 
signed on the right hand corner at the top. 

Q. But in all cases the certificates bear the receipt of the payee ? — In all 
cases. Yes, sir. 

Q. "What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is dated on tin 
thirty first of August in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
seven (1887). It is in favour of the Quebec Bank for one hundred and threej 
thousand four hundred and seventy-nine dollars ($103,479.00). 

Q. It is receipted by the officers of the Quebec Bank ? — A. It is receipted! 
by one of the officers of the Quebec Bank. 

The witness files cheque and certificate as exhibit (D 12) at enquete. 

Q. "What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is for eighty-five 
thousand eight hundred and fourteen dollars ($85,814.00) dated the twenty 
second day of October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-! 
seven (1887) and in favour of the Quebec Bank. 

Q. It bears the receipt of whom ? — A. This bears the receipt of J. H. 
Pinney. 

Q. Who is he ? — A. He is an officer of the bank. 

Witness produces cheque and certificate which is filed as exhibit (D 13) 
at enquete. 

64 



Edgfar versus ( Jaron. 

Q. Whal is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated ou the ninth 

if April, one thousand eight hundred and eight-eighl (188o), and is for 
forty two thousand seven hundred and twenty dollars ($42,720.00) in favourof 
he Quebec Bank and is signed by C. V. N"oel, the Manager of the Bank. 

Witness produces cheque and certificate which is tiled as ex hi hit (D 14) 

iquete. 

(,). What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the 
twenty-seventh day of February, one thousand eighl hundred and eighty-uine 
(1889), and is for nineteen thousand nine hundred and eleven dollars ($19,911). 
It is in favour of the Quebec Bank for the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway 
Company, and is also signed for by Mr. JSToel, Manager of the Quebec Bank. 
This cheque was issued in virtue of an Order in Council of the sixteenth day 
of February. 

Witness produces cheque and certificate as exhibit (D 15) at enquete. 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next*cheque is dated on the twenty- 
fifth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine (1889) and 
is for thirty-eight thousand four hundred and forty dollars ($38,140) in favour 
of the Quebec Bank and is receipted by Mr. Piddington, an officer of the 
hank. 

Q. Is it by virtue of any Order in Council? — Yes, an Order in Council 
of the twelfth day of October. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D 16) at enquete. 

What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the sixteenth 
1 lav of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (1891) 
and is for twenty thousand eight hundred dollars ($20,800). It is in favour 
of Frank Ross. The previous power of attorney is clone away with, and 
another substituted. It is issued by authority of Order in Council of the 
ninth day of said January. 

Q. And is receipted? — A. I fancy that this cheque must have been sent 
to the department. There is no receipt on the certificate. The practice is 
to send cheques sometimes to the department. Mr. Ross in whose favour that 
was drawn lived in Quebec, I suppose, and the department that asks for a 
cheque has the cheque sent to them, and they would transmit it to the party. 
When the party is in Ottawa the cheque is delivered personally 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D 17) at enquete. 

Q. What endorsement do you find on that cheque ? — A. The endorse- 
ment is " pay to the order of Ross & Co., in liquidation." " Frank Ross for 
the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company." It is endorsed by ■" Ross 
&Co., in liquidation for Frank Ross," and then it seems to have been deposited 
in the Quebec Bank, Montreal, as they endorsed it "pay to the order of the 
Quebec Bank, Montreal, for collection on account of Quebec Bank, Quebec, 
James Stevenson, General Manager, for the Quebec Bank, Thomas McDou gall, 
Manager." 

Q. With regard to exhibit D 17, of course after a cheque is paid by the 
bank it is returned by the bank to the department? — A. Yes, sir. The 
next cheque is dated on the thirteenth day of February, in the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and ninety-one, for fourteen hundred dollars. It is in 
favour of Frank Ross also, and it is authorized by Order in Council of the 
second of said February. 

Q. Is the certificate receipted in this case? — A. The certificate is not 
receipted. 

65 

27—5 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189c' 

Q. What endorsement does the cheque bear? — A. " Frank Ross for th < 
Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Company." " Ross & Co. in liquidation, Jamd 
Geggie," and "for credit Quebec Bank, James Stevenson, cashier." 

Q. For credit of Quebec Bank, is that at Ottawa? — A. That I fancy 1 
the endorsation of the Quebec Bank here, to be placed to the credit of th 
Quebec Bank at Ottawa. 

Cheque with certificate filed as exhibit (D 18). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on tw 
twentieth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (1891' 
for fifteen thousand one hundred and fifty dollars ($15,150.00). It is in favoni 
of Frank Ross for the Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Company, and:) 
authorized by Order in Council of the seventeenth of said February. Thj 
cheque is endorsed by Frank Ross for Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Conj 
pany, and " John Ross & Co. in liquidation for credit Quebec Bank, J. SteveiH 
son, cashier." 

Q. In this case also the certificate is not receipted ? — A. It is not receipted 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D 19). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on till 
twenty-seventh day of February, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-od 
(1891), and is for twenty-six thousand three hundred dollars ($^6,300.00). M 
is in favour of Frank Ross for Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Company, U 
endorsed by Frank Ross for Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Company, ani 
re-endorsed by John Ross & Co., in liquidation, and for credit Quebec Banli 
J. Stevenson, cashier. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D 20). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on tl:i 
thirtieth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (1891}, 
for six thousand seven hundred dollars ($6,700.00) in favour of Frank Ros 
for Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, is endorsed p. p. Fran 
Ross, James Geggie, " for the Quebec Bank, Thomas H. Jones, Accountan 
endorsation guaranteed." 

Q. This one bears the statement that it is for subsidy under 51 Vic, caji 
3, does it not? — A. Yes, sir, it is authorized by Order in Council of thl 
eighteenth day of April, 1891. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D 21). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on tlj 
seventeenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and ninety one (18911 
for nine thousand six hundred dollars, in favour of Frank Ross, Quebec anL 
Lake St. John Railway Company, is endorsed by Frank Ross for Quebec anh 
Lake 81 John Railway Company, John Ross & Co., in liquidation, deposl 
credit Quebec Bank, Quebec, J. Stevenson, Cashier. This is issued undi 
authority 58 Vic, Cap 2, by Order in Council of the eighteenth day of Mail 
IS!)]. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (E> 22). 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is for four thousanj 
five hundred and twenty two dollars and seventy three cents ($4,522.73) ! 
dated thirteenth day of November, in the year one thousand eight hundrd 
and ninety one (1891) in favour of Frank Ross, Quebec and Lake St. Joh 
Railway Company, is endorsed for Frank Ross, Quebec, for Quebec and \aiV 
St. John Railway, and deposit of credit of Quebec Bank, Quebec, J. Stevenso 
( icn«i;il Manager. It is issued under authority 53 Vic, cap. 2, and is also und< 
authority of Order in Council of the fifteenth day of October, 1891. 

66 



Edg-ar versus Caron. 



-© 



Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (I). 23). 

Q. These are all the subsidies paid to the Quebec and Lake St. John 
ailway Company down to the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
ie (1891)? — A. Yes. I also produce with reference to the first thirty-two 
lousand dollars ($32,000.00) paid, the authority, charging to the Quebec and 
ake St. John Railway Company seven thousand six hundred and forty-four 
>llars and forty-five cents ($7,v>44.-l5) ; that is Customs duties which J attach 

hibit (D 1). 

Q. I presume these are Customs duties on materials imported by the 
ilway ? — A. I do not know anything about that. 

Q. What is the total amount of the subsidies of which you have given 
ddence ? — A. The total amount is eight hundred and thirty-two thousand 
ght hundred and twenty-seven dollars and seventy-three cents ($832,827.73). 

Q. That is down to the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety - 
le? — A. Yes. I produce also a summary statement of the said subsidies 
om exhibit (L) 1) to exhibit (D 23), said statement being marked (D 24). 

(I Will you now proceed to produce the documents with regard to the 
ivments on account of the subsidies paid to the Temiscouata Railway Coni- 
iny? — A. The first payment is by two cheques dated the fourteenth day of 
pptember, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven (1*87), one on the 
lolsous Bank, Montreal, in favour of C. A. Pipon, Manager of the Molsons 
ank, Toronto, for Temiscouata Railway Company, ten thousand dollars ; and 
i the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, for forty five thousand nine hundred and 
rty-six dollars ($45,946.00) in favour of the same party. It is authorized 
'; order in Council of the ninth of September, 1887. It is endorsed by 
harles A. Pipon, Manager for collection and credit of the Molson's Bank, 
ipronto, for the Molsons Bank, James Elliott, Manager, T. A. M. 

Q. The first cheque for ten thousand dollars is endorsed how ? — It is 
dorsed by C. A. Pipon. Manager for collection and credit of the Molsons 
ank, Toronto, C. A. Pipon, Manager. 

Q. Where is the authority for putting it that way? — A. It is a power of 
torney from the Temiscouata Railway Company to Charles Pipon signed 
the President of the Company, A. R. McDonald. 

Q,. Is it in favor of Pipon personally, or Pipon as agent of the Bank ? 

As Pipon, Manager of the Bank. It is signed Charles A. Pipon, Manager 
the Branch Molson's Bank in the city of Toronto. 

Q. Can you say why the sum was divided in two cheques ? — A. Yes, we 
id not money enough in the Molsons Bank ; we never keep a large sum in 
e Molsons Bank. 

Q. And so, one of the cheques was drawn on the Molsons Bank at 
ontreal? — A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And one upon the Bank of Montreal at Ottawa ? — A. Yes. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (DTI.) 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the fifth 
iy of October, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven (1887). It is 
r fifty-four thousand two hundred and forty-eight dollars (S54.248.00) in 
veur of the Molsons Bank, Toronto, for the Temiscouata Railway Company. 
is authorized by an Order in Council of the first of said October and is 
idorsed by Charles A. Pipon, Manager for collection and credit of the Molsons 
iank, Toronto, C. A. Pipon, Manager. 

Cheque and certificate filed as "exhibit (D T 2). 



97_ % 



-5i 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18| 

Q. AVhat is the next cheque? — The next cheque is dated on the twenjl; 
ninth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven (18m 
it is for forty-four thousand eight hundred and six dollars ($44,806.00), alsoll 
the order of Charles A Pipon, Manager of ihe Molsons Bank, Toronto, ifl 
authorized by Order in Council of the twenty-eighth of said November aft 
endorsed by Charles A. Pipon, Manager for collection and credit ofBankil 
Montreal, Toronto, C. B rough, Manager. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 3). 

( v ). What is the next cheque?— A. The next cheque is dated on the thiH 
first day of December, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven (18q| 
it is for eleven thousand one hundred and eighty-four dollars ($11, 184.B 
payable to the order of Charles A. Pipon, Manager of the Molsons Baft 
Toronto, for Temiscouata Railway Company. It is endorsed by Charlesl 
Pipon, Manager and for collection and credit of Bank of Montreal, Toroin 
C. Brough, Manager. 

Q. What is the signature at the bottom? — A. These are Mr Bradldfc 
initials, A. P. B. It indicates that the cheque was sent to the Department. 
Railways and Canals to be sent to Mr. Pipon at Toronto. 

Q. As a matter of fact it is probable that all of these cheques which I 
not receipted upon the certificates were sent by you to the Departments 
Railways. — A. I have no doubt of it. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 4). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on I 
thirteenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight. It 
is for fifty thousand five hundred dollars ($50,500) in favour of Chariest 
Pipon, Manager of the Molsons Bank, Toronto, for Temiscouata Railvjy 
Company. It is authorized by Order in Council of the eighth day of s[d 
February and is endorsed by A. P. Broderick for Manager. 

Q. It bears the stamp of the bank? — A. Yes, it bears "Molsons Ban 
Toronto, for collection and credit of Bank of Montreal, Toronto, C. Broitt 
Manager." I may explain that that certificate was for two payments, but ■ 
does not concern the Temiscouata Railway Company. 

Q. This cheque at any rate appears to have been endorsed by some dw 
qualified officer of the bank? — A. I have no doubt of it. 

Q. You say that this cheque was for two payments ? — A. Yes, sir, I m 
the certificate was for two payments, but one does not concern this inquirp 
ie tin; Murray Canal. 

Q. The cheque is only for that portion which concerns the Temiscoufi 
Rail vv ay ': — A Exactly. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 5). 

Q. VV hat is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is for thirty-tip 
thousand dollars ($33,0<i0) and is dated on the sixth day of June, in the w 
<>nc thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight (1888). It is in favour of ji 
Bauk of Montreal, Ottawa. The former power of attorney is superseded!* 
another which I produce attached to the cheque and certificate. It is am 
ized by Order in Council of the sixth day of said June and the chequat 
receipted by J. VV. C. O'Grady, of the Bank of Montreal. 

Q, If is receipted for by O'Grady on the certificate itself? — A. Yes, sink 
was handed t<> him. 

Filed as exhibit (DT 6). 

Q, \Vli:M is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on 
twenty-seventh day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred 

68 



!» 






Edffar versus Caroh. 



*e 



Jrhtv-eight (1*88). It is for twenty -one thousand dollars ($21,000) payable 

Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. It is authorized by Order in Council of the 

enty-fifth day of said July and is receipted for by C. A.Elliott, of the Bank 

, Montreal. This cheque was likewise not endorsed, but the receipt is on the 

i rhHcate. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (I) T 7). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the eighth 
if September, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight 
388), and is for sixty-one thousand four hundred and sixty-four dollars 
i 1.464) in favour of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. It is authorized by Order 
Council of the fifth of said September and is receipted for by J. W. C. 
Grady, of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. The receipt is contained on the 
Irtificate of the Auditor General. 

Cheque and certificate as exhibit (1) T 8). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the sixth 

►f October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight 

i and is for ten thousand dollars ($10,000) in favour of the Bank of 

unreal, Ottawa. It is also receipted for by Mr. O'Grady. It is authorized 

• Order in Council of the twenty-fifth day of September. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 9). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the 
enty-seventh day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
ndred and eighty-eight (1888). It is for fifty-nine thousand and six dollars 

006). It is in favour of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. It is authorized 

• Order in Council of the twenty-third day of November, and is receipted 
p by Mr. Elliott, of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (I) T 10). 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next is dated on the first day of 
•bruary, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine (1889), and is for 
even thousand seven hundred and forty-six dollars ($11,746) in favour of the 
ank of Montreal, Ottawa. It is authorized by Order in Council of the 

I y-seventh inst., but this must mean the twenty-second of January, 1889, 
scause it cannot be the twenty-second clay ot February, when the cheque is 
ited on the first of February. It is receipted for by Mr. O'Grady, of the 
ank of Montreal, Ottawa. The receipt is contained on the certificate of the 
uditor General. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 11). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is a payment of 
venty-four thousand three hundred dollars ($74,300) by two cheques both in 
vour of the Bank of Montreal. The first for four thousand three hundred 
hilars on the Bank of Toronto, Toronto, and the balance of seventy thousand 
ollars ($70,000) on the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. They are both dated on 

twenty-third of January (1890). They are authorized by Order in 
ouiicil of the fifteenth day of said January, and by 48 Vic, cap. 58. I did 
)t notice that the Act was mentioned in the others. It is also receipted for 
Mr. O'Grady. 

Q. The first cheque is on the Bank of Toronto, Toronto. — A. Yes. It is 
ulorsed for collection and credit of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, F. Gundry. 
lanager, and endorsed for collection and credit of the Bank of Montreal, 
bronto, C. B rough, Manager. It is receipted for by Mr. O'Grady, of the 
; ank of Montreal, also. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 12). 

69 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 183 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is dated on tb 
seventeenth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and ninety ('8ffl 
in favour of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa, for the Temiscouata RailwB: 
Company, and is for forty-eight thousand five hundred and twenty dollaj 
($48,520). It is issued under authority of 51 Vic, cap. 3, and Order B 
Council of the fifth day of said December. It is receipted for by Mr. O'GracH 
of the Bank of .iontreal, Ottawa. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 13). 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is dated on t» 
twentieth day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninelt 
one (1891) in favour of the Bank of Montreal. Ottawa, and is for thirty-foU 
thousand two hundred and fifty dollars ($34,250.0 ). It is by 51 Vic, cal 
3, and Order in Council of the sixteenth day of January, and receipted for v 
Mr. O'Grady, of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 14). 

Q. What is the next cheque? — A. The next cheque is dated on the mill 
day of October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (1831 
and is for thirteen thousand three hundred and ninety-five dollars ($13,395.0(1 
It is in favour of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. It is authorized by 51 Vijj 
cap. 3, and Order in Council of the second day of said October. It is receipt I 
for by Mr. O'Grady, of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 15). 

Q. What is the next cheque ? — A. The next cheque is dated the twen if 
third day of December, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (189u 
It is for forty-one thousand four hundred and thirty-five dollars ($41,435.0,.* 
also in favour of the Bank of Montreal, Ottawa. It is authorized by Ordp 
in Council of the nineteenth day of said December, and is receipted for by MS 
O'Grady. 

Cheque and certificate filed as exhibit (D T 16). 

Q, r l hat is all you have in reference to this railway up to the end of t v 
year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (1891) ? — A Yes. 

Q. What is the total amount of the subsidies which you have mention! 
up to the end of the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one (1801 
— A. The total amount of the subsidies was six hundred and twenty-fo 
thousand eight hundred dollars ($624,800.00). 

<l All of these amounts were paid as subsidies granted to that road 
the Government of Canada? — A. Yes, sir, as appears by the certificate. 

W itness H les summary statement of the above amount as exhibit (D T 1 

Q. The sums which you have mentioned constitute the whole of the pr.- 
ments that were made on account of the subsidies to those two railways? — 
i sir; they arc all the amounts that we have charged. 

Q. Down to the end of the year one thousand eight hundred and ninef 
-in- (1891)?— A. Yea. 

Q In each case there lias been some moneys paid since that date? — 1} 

Q you have no other payments in the Department of Finance referrin 
to these matters excepting those which you have brought? — A. I do if 
know of any. There may be a letter cancelling the first power of attorney 
the case of the Temiscouata Railway. Of late years we require a letter bef< 
cancelling, bul years ago we did not. The new power of attorney we tol 
cancelled the old, bul of late years we have required a letter. 

Q. And of late years you have required a letter? — A. Yes. 

70 



Edrrar versus Caron. 



.-' 



Q. And yon say there may be such a letter cancelling the power of 
attorney in the case of the Temiscouata Railway Company? — A. There may 

Q. And you are not sure if there is? — A. I am no1 sure if then' is. 

Q. But apart from that there are no other documents relating to the 
natter in the possession of the Finance Department? — A. No other that I 
enow of, except copies of the Orders in Council. Of course, we have copies of 
ill the Orders in Council. 

Counsel for Sir A. P. Caron do not cross-examine the witness. 

And further deponent saith not. 

And [, Thomas P. Owens, one of the official reporters of the House of 
Jommons and a sworn stenographer in this case, do depose on the oath I have 
taken that the above is a true and faithful transcript of the evidence of the 
above named witness taken by me by means of stenography. 

TIIOS. P. OWENS. 



Quebec, 21st September, 1892. 

The Royal Commission to inquire as to the truth or falsity of certain 
charges made against the Honourable Sir Adolphe P. Caron, resumed its sitting 
at the city of Quebec this morning for the taking of evidence in reference to 
jsuch charges. 

Present: — The Honourable Adolphe Basile Routhier, and the Honourable 
Melbourne M. Tait, Commissioners. 

Louis K. Jones, Clerk in the Department of Railways and Canals and 
jSecretary to the Chief Engineer of the Government of Railways, aged forty- 
two (42) years, being duly sworn, deposed as follows : — 

Examined by Mr. Bisaillon, Q. C, of Counsel for the Crown. 

Q. Mr. Jones, will you state to the Commissioners what is your position 
in the Department of Railways and Canals ? — A. I am Clerk in the Depart- 
ment and Secretary to the Chief Engineer of the Government Railwa} x s. 

Q. You received a subpoena to bring with you all the papers in connection 
with the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway and the Temiscouata Railway? — 
|A. I did. 

Q. Did you bring these papers ? — A. Yes, I brought all the papers that 
were given to me. 

Q, Are all these papers the originals ? — A. All these papers are the 
originals, except the Orders in Council, and they are certified copies, the 
originals never going out. * 

Q. Have you amongst your papers a petition of E. Beaudet, Vice-President 
of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, asking amendments to the 
Act passed the last session, and asking one hundred and seventy thousand 
dollars ($170,000.00) additional on account of the line being twenty-five miles 
longer than was estimated ? — A. Yes. 

Q. What is it ? — A. It is from the Minister of Finance inclosing a peti- 
tion of E Beaudet, Esquire, Vice-President of the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway, asking an amendment of the A ct passed last session by granting one 
hundred and seventy thousand dollars ($170,000.00) additional on account of 
the line being twenty-five miles longer than was estimated. It encloses petition 

71 



5G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189$ 

signed by some members of Parliament. The petition is addressed to Si 
Charles Tupper, then Minister of Railways and Canals. It is sent by thfl 
Deputy Minister of Finance, Mr. Courtney ; the Minister of Finance thel 
being Sir Leonard Tilley. 

Petition filed as exhibit (LJ 1). 

Also I produce and file a letter from J. G. Scott, dated the fourth of MaJ 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-three (1883) addressed tj: 
the Secretary of the Department of Railways enclosing a specification togethe 
with the certificate from the Chief Engineer to the effect that " the sectioir 
for the subsidy upon w T hich payment is now asked is a fair average to th 
quality of work of the whole road." 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 2). 

I also file a certified copy of Order in Council dated on the sevenfj 
day of June, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-three (1883) granting I 
further subsidy of three thousand two hundred dollars ($3,200.00) per mile foi 
additional- distance of twenty-five miles (25) not exceeding on the whole eightj 
thousand dollars ($80,000.00), and containing sketch of the approximate route 
This copy of the Order in Council is certified by the Clerk of the Privy Coun 
cil, Mr. John J. McGee. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 3). 

I also produce a certified copy of Order in Council dated the eighteenth 
day of August one thousand eight hundred and eighty-three (1883) giving 
authority to execute an agreement with the above Railway Company fo 
the construction of a line between St. Raymond and Lake St. John. Fron 
the Journal, this Order in Council appears to have been amended by anothe 
Order in Council of a later date. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 4). 

I also produce a letter numbered 32619. There appeared to be two petition 
addressed to Sir A. P. Caron, Minister of Militia, and they appear to have beeil 
transferred by him to the department without any remark. This is a lettei 
addressed to the Honourable Sir A. P. Caron and he appears to have transferre< 
two petitions, one from the inhabitants of the parish of Val Cartier and th 
other from the inhabitants of the parish of St. Gabriel West, County o 
Quebec, praying for a subsidy to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway 
Company for the purpose of purchasing rails for the abandoned location of th« 
road, ten miles between River Jacques Cartier and Gosford, and failing ; 
subsidy asking the Government for old rails. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 5). 

I ;il so produce and file report from Mr. Ridout, dated the tenth day o 
November, on the first ten miles section of the Quebec and Lake St. Join 
Railway. He considers the work on this section a fair average of the whol< 
line and recommends a payment of the subsidy of three thousand two hundrec 
dollars ($3,200) per mile on this section, amounting to the sum of thirtv-tw( 
thousand dollars ($32,000). 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 6). 

I also produce and file a letter from the Deputy Minister or Commissione 
of Customs dated on the sixteenth of November, one thousand eight hundrec 
and eighty-three (1883), addressed to the Secretary of the Department o 
Railways and Canals with reference to the claim of the Department of Custom; 
againsl Messrs. Withall and Ross, and stating it was understood that th( 
amount due for this claim would be deducted from the first payment of th 






Ederar versus Garon. 



i e 



dy. The amount of the claim is seven thousand -even hundred and 
c\ out \ -seven dollars and fifty-two cents ($7,777.52). 
Filed as exhibit (LJ 7). 

I also produce and file another letter from the Commissioner of Customs 
lated on the seventeenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and 
ighty-three (1883), stating that the amount is found to be seven thousand six 
nnidred and forty-four dollars and forty-five cents ($7,644.45), the other 
imount being incorrect. 
Filed as exhibit (LJ 8). 

I also produce certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the fifteenth 
v of Xovember, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-three 
1883), authorizing payment of subsidy of three thousand two hundred dollars 
per mile for the first ten (10) miles, or a total of thirty-two thousand dollars 
18-2,000). 

Filed as exhibit (L J 9). 

I also produce letter dated the twenty- first day of November, in the year 
roe thousand eight hundred and eighty-three (1883), from the Accountant of 
the Department of Customs, Mr. Parmelee, addressed to the Secretary of the 
Department of Railways and Canals, asking that a cheque be issued in favour 
of the Customs Department for the sum of seven thousand six hundred and 
forty-four dollars and forty-five cents ($7,645.45), and deducted from the 
Bubsidy to the Lake St. John Railway. 
Filed as exhibit (L J 10). 

T also produce document purporting to be a letter from J. G. Scott, 
Secretary of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway, dated on the twenty- 
sixth day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
four (1884) and addressed to Sir Charles Tupper, Minister of Railways, stating 
jthat he is directed on behalf of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Com- 
pany to request that the Government will be pleased to take the necessary 
(means to complete the subsidy granted to this railway by the resolution of 
the years one thousand eight hundred and eighty-two (1882), and one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-three (188 ; :>), so 'that it may cover the whole mileage 
'to be built, and then he gives in detail the mileage and encloses a pamphlet 
and map. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 11). 

I also produce and file a petition sent by J. G. Gagnier, Thomas McGreevy 
and several others, addressed to The Honourable Sir Charles Tupper, Minister 
of Railways and Canals, and dated Ottawa, the first day of March, one 
i thousand eight hundred and eighty-four (1884), and appears to be a petition 
asking for aid for the Lake St. John Railway Company, and is apparently 
signed by a number of Members of Parliament. 
Filed as exhibit (L J 12). 

I also produce and file letter addressed by J G. Scott, Secretary of the 
Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, to the Secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Railways and Canals, dated on the nineteenth day ot July, one 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-four (1884), in which he states that he is 
directed to enclose for the information of the department a copy of the 
resolution of the Board of Directors of this Company, adopted at a meeting 
held on the tenth instant, transferring to Messrs. Ross and Company, of 
Quebec, the subsidy payable by the Dominion of Canada at the rate of three 
thousand two hundred dollars ($3,200.00) per mile upon ten miles of this 
railway, from Station 2186 at Lake St. Simon to Station 2714, near River Pierre. 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189] 

Filed as exhibit (L J 13). 

I also produce and file a repoit signed by Mr. Collingwood Schriebej 
Chief Engineer of Government Railways, dated on the eighth day of April, i 
the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty -five, addressed to tlh 
Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals, on the second ten mild 
north of St. Raymond on the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway, stating tha 
the section is not completed according to the requirements of the contracli 
and enclosing a copy of the report of Mr. Ridout, Inspecting Engineer. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 14). 

I also produce and file a certified copy of the Order in Council, dated o t 
the tw^enty-second day of April, in the year one thousand eight hundred anil 
eighty-five (1885), authorizing payment of a sum of thirty-seven thousand an 
twenty-seven dollars ($37,027.00) to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railwaf 
Company, being the subsidy on the second ten miles north of St. Raymond. I] 

Filed as exhibit (L J 15). 

I also produce and file a letter sent by J. G. Scott, dated on the nintj 
da} 7 of September, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-fiv 
(1885), addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways and CanaLI 
and stating "we have transferred to Messrs. Ross & Company, by deed befoi 
notary, the subsidy payable by the Dominion upon thirty miles of this railwa! 
from station 2714 to station 4298, opposite to the Island of Lake Edward." 

Filed as exhibit (L J 16). 

I also produce a letter from S. Piddington, who, I think, signs for thl 
manager of the Quebec Bank, addressed to the Secretary of the Departmed 
of Railways & Canals, under date the first day of September, in the year on 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-five (1885), stating that he encloses 
power of attorney received from Messrs. Ross & Company, Quebec, to be place 
on file. The power of attorney does not appear to be here, but it appears t 
be filed with contracts. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 17). 

I also file report signed by Mr. Schreiber, dated on the twelfth day c 
September, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five (1885 | 
addressed to the Secretary of the Department, with reference to the inspection 
of the section of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway between the twentietl' 
and thirtieth miles west from St. Raymond, and stating that under the term 
of the contract he thinks that the subsidy of thirty-eight thousand three hud 
dred and seventy-three dollars ($38,373.00), applicable to this section, has beeii 
earned, and the company may be considered entitled to receive it, and he en 
closes a copy of the report of Mr. Ridout, inspecting engineer. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 18). 

1 also file certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the fifteenth daj 
of September, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five (1885)* 
being aul hority to pay to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, th 
amount of their subsidy apportioned to the section between the twentieth an<j 
thirtieth miles, t be sum of thirty-eight thousand three hundred and seventy 
three dollars ($38,373.00). 

Filed ;is exhibit (L J 19). 

I also Til*- a letter signed J. G. Scott, secretary of the Quebec & Lake Stj 
John Railway Company, dated on the twenty-first day of September, in th 
year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five (1885), addressed to th 
Departmenl of Railways and Canals, enclosing copies of the following 
transfers of the subsidies payable by the Government to this company. Oij 

74 



Edfirar versus Laron. 



-& 



the twenty-fourth day of August, one thousand eighl hundred and eighty-five, 
transfer in favour of Ross & Company, of seventy thousand dollars ($70,000.00), 
out of a subsidy of ninety -six thousand dollars ($96,000.00). Also a transfer 
in favour of the Honourable J. G. Ross, as president of the Quebec & Lake 
St. John Railway Lumbering and Trading Company, of twenty-six thousand 
dollars ($26,000.00), out of a subsidy of ninety-six thousand dollars ($96,000.00). 
On September the fourteenth, a transfer in favour of Ross & Company, of 
thirty-two thousand dollars ($32,000.00), being a subsidy upon ten miles from 
station 3770 to 4298. The transfers are not under this cover and this is jusl a 
letter covering them. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 20). 

I also produce and tile a letter signed Jas. G. Ross, President of the Quebec 
& Lake St. John Railway Lumbering and Trading Company, dated on the tenth 
day of October, one thousand eight hundred and eighty five (1885), addressed 
to the Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals, enclosing a copy 
of resolution of Board of Directors of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway 
Lumbering and Trading Company, transferring to the Quebec Bank a subsidy 
to the extent of twenty six thousand dollars ($26,000,00) transferred to him 
in his capacity as President of that Company on the twenty-fourth day of 
August previous. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 21). 

I also produce and file a report signed Collingwood Schreiber, dated on 
the ninth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and eighty five 
(1885), addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals, 
with reference to the inspection from the thirtieth to the fourtieth miles north 
of St. Raymond. He says that the subsidy applicable to this section amounts 
to twenty seven thousand eight hundred and forty dollars ($27,840.00) which 
may be deemed to have been earned. He refers to the report of the Inspec- 
ting Engineer, Mr. Ridout. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 22). 

I also produce and file certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the 
sixteenth day of November in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hun- 
dred and eighty-five (1885), with reference to the section of the Quebec and 
Lake St. John Railway, from the beginning of the thirtieth to the fortieth 
mile north of St. Raymond. It authorizes the payment of twenty-seven thou- 
sand eight hundred and forty dollars ($27,840.00)'. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 23). 

I also produce and file a report signed Collingwood Schreiber, dated on 
eleventh day of January, one thousand eight hundred and eighty six (1886) 
addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals, with 
reference to the section of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway between 
the fortieth and fiftieth miles north of St. Raymond. It refers to Mr. Ridout's 
inspection and it says "he thinks that the balance of twenty-four thousand five 
hundred and thirty-two dollars ($24,532.00) might sately be paid the Company." 

Filed as exhibit (L J 24). 

I also produce and file a letter signed J. G. Scott, Secretary of the Que- 
bec and Lake St. John Railway, dated on the twelfth day of January, one 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886) addressed to the Secretary of 
the Department of Railways and Canals, making application on behalf of the 
Company to enter into an agreement with the Government with reference to 
that portion of the line extending from its junction with the North Shore Rail- 
way to St. Raymond subsidised bv Act 48 & 49 Vic, cap. 59. 

75 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 

Filed as exhibit (L J 25). 

I also produce and file copy of an Order in Council dated on the eighteenth 
day ot January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886) 
being authority to pay to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company 
the sum of twenty four thousand five hundred and thirty two dollars ($24,532.00) 
as per report of the Chief Engineer. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 26). 

I also produce and file certified copy of the Order in Council dated on the 
twenty eighth day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-six (1886) approving of the agreement and location plans of the fifty 
miles north of St. Raymond for which a subsidy of ninety six thousand dol- 
lars ($96,000.00) has been voted. In this is included the specification and a 
draft of agreement approved. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 27). 

I also produce a report signed Collingwood Schreiber, dated on the 
eleventh day of February, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
six (1886) addressed to the Secretary of the .Department of Railways and 
Canals, reporting that he considers the subsidy of ninety-six thousand dollars 
($96,000.00) has been earned. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 28). 

I also produce and file certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the 
seventeenth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six 
(1886) authorizing the payment to the Lake St. John Railway Company of 
ninety-six thousand dollars ($96,000.00) on that part of the line from the 
junction with the North Shore Railway to St. Raymond. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 29). 

I also produce and file letter from Sir A. P. Caron, Minister of Militia, 
dated on the fourth day of March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-six (1886) to the Department of Railways and Canals, and stating " I 
beg to enclose you a petition from the Quebec & Lake St. John Railway Com- 
pany which has been placed in my hands for the purpose of transferring it to 
you. It transfers a petition signed by J. G. Ross, President .of the Lake St. 
John Railway Company for an increase of subsidy. 

Q. An increase to how much ? — A. The endorsation on the back of the 
paper says an increase to six thousand dollars per mile for one hundred and 
eighty miles from Quebec to Lake St. John. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 30). 

Q. Please produce the other letters and documents and describe them as 
you have been doing ? — A. I also produce and file a letter from J. G. Scott, 
dated on I he first day of April, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six 
(1886) addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways and Canals, 
Baying that he is directed to toward the enclosed list of shareholders of this 
Company. 

Q. What are the names of the shareholders according to this letter? — 
A. Bon. Jas. G. Ross, Quebec, P.Q., $25,000 ; W. S. Ogden, Cardiff, Wales, 
$25,000.00; William Withall, Montreal, P.Q., $25,000.00 ; John Ross, Quebec, 
P.Q., $85,000.00 ; dames Connelly, Munissing, Michigan, $12,500.00 ; Estate 
late J. B. Renaud, Quebec, I\Q.,' $5,000.00 ; Elisee Beaudet, Quebec, P.Qi 
$3,000.00; Hon. Sir A. P. Caron, Ottawa, $2,500.00; Hon. P. Garneau, 
Quebec, $2,000.00 ; Hon. I. Tl.ibaudeau, Quebec, P.Q., $2,500.00 ; Estate late 
P. V;i!l. ■,-. $500.00 ; city ot Quebec, $450,000.00. Small shareholders repre- 
senting of stock $101,000.00. Total $079,000.00. 

76 



E Igar versus Caron. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 31). 

I produce and file letter signed J. G. Scott, Secretary of the Lake St. John 
Railway Company and dated on the twenty first day of June, one thousand 
light hundred and eighty-six (1886) addressed to the Secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Railways, enclosing a copy of the transfer of the subsidy of three 
thousand two hundred dollars ($3,200.00) per mile payable by the Dominion 
Government, in favour of Ross & Company, Quebec, for forty miles from sta tion 
g296 to station 2410. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 32). 

I also produce and file a report signed Collingwood Schreiber, dated on 
the seventh day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
six, addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, in which he 
Lys that the work is now completed according to contract on the section of 
railway between the fortieth and fiftieth miles north of St. Raymond, entitling 
the company to receive the balance of the subsidy applicable to this section 
amounting to six thousand dollars ($6,000.00) which he suggests be paid. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 33.) 

I also produce and file certified copy of Order in Council dated on the 
thirteenth day of July, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six 
(1886), authorizing the payment of six thousand dollars ($6,000.00) on the 
section referred to above in accordance with the report of the chief engineer. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 34). 

I also produce and file a report signed for Mr. Schrieber by F. J. Lynch, 
who was engineer in charge of Mr. Schreiber's office and he signs Mr. 
Schreiber's name by his initials. It is dated on the twenty-second day of 
September, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886). It 
is in reference to the inspection of the section of the Lake St. John Railway from 
the fiftieth to the seventieth mile north of St. Raymond, and quotes the report 
of Mr. Ridout, the inspecting engineer. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 35). 

I also produce certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the twenty- 
ninth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
and eighty-six (1886), authorizing the payment to the Lake St. John Railway 
Company the sum of eighty-three thousand six hundred and eighty-eight 
dollars ($83,688.00). 

Filed as exhibit (L J 36). 

I also produce the report signed Collingwood Schrieber, dated on the 
twenty-fifth day of November, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-six (1886), addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways 
and Canals, with reference to the inspection of the section from the seventieth 
to the eightieth mile north of St. Raymond. It says that Mr. Ridout has 
inspected section eight (8) and reinspected sections six (6) and seven (7). With 
the exception of a few timber box culverts, which are condemned, he states that 
the work is well and substantially done. The subsidy applicable to the three 
sections from the fiftieth to the eightieth mile is one hundred and thirty-five 
thousand five hundred and thirty-five dollars ($135,535.00); deducting cost of 
replacing timber culverts with masonry, three thousand one hundred dollars 
($3,100.00), balance one hundred and thirty-two thousand four hundred and 
thirty-four dollars ($132,434.00). 

Filed as exhibit (L J 37). 

I also produce another report signed by -Mr. Schrieber, dated on the 
fourth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886). 

77 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893 

It is addressed to the Secretary of the Department ot Railways. He says that 
it appears the sum of thirty-five thousand three hundred and ten dollars 
($3v310.00) is applicable to the first ten mile section of the Lake St. John 
Railway north of St. Raymond, whereas thirty-two thousand dollars only of 
that amount has been paid, leaving a balance of three thousand three hundred! 
and ten dollars ($3,310.00) due thereon, which "I now certify, as this section 
of the road is completed." The cause of thirty-two thousand dollars only 
having been previously certified on this section is that at the time the 1 
certificate was prepared the total subsidy had not been apportioned off intoj 
sections. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 38). 

I also produce and file certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the 
seventh day of December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
six (1886) authorizing the payment of that balance of three thousand three 
hundred and ten dollars ($3,310) on the first ten miles section of the road from 
St. Raymond northwards. 

Filed as exhibit (LJ 39). 

I also produce and file certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the 
seventeenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-six (1886) authorizing the payment of forty-eight thousand 
seven hundred and forty-seven dollars ($48,747) under a certificate of the 
Chief Engineer of Railways on the sections between the fiftieth and eightieth 
miles north of St. Raymond. 

Exhibit (LJ40). 

I also file a letter signed J. G-. Scott, addressed to the Secretary of the 
Railway Department, dated on the twenty-fourth day of December in the year 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six (1886) asking the Secretary to 
send him a memo, showing how the payment of forty-eight thousand seven 
hundred and forty-seven dollars ($48,747) made the previous day is arrived 
at, and how much of it belongs to the three thousand two hundred dollars 
($3,200) a mile subsidy, and how much to the one thousand nine hundred 
and sixty-one dollars ($1,961) per mile subsidy. On the back of the paper 
there is the endorsation that it was referred to the Chief Engineer of Railways 
and on the back of the paper there is the endorsation that the subsidies 
applicable to sections six, seven and eight amount to one hundred and thirty- 
five thousand five hundred and thirty-five dollars ($135,535) deducting 
estimated cost of replacing timber culvert with masonry three thousand one 
hundred dollars ($3,100) leaving a balance of one hundred and thirty-two 
thousand four hundred and thirty-five dollars ($132,435) ; previously paid 
eighty-three thousand six hundred and eighty-two dollars ($83,68:) leaving to 
be ]»:ii«l forty-eight thousand seven hundred and forty-seven dollars ($48,747). 
Filed as exhibit (LJ 41). 

I also produce and file a report signed Collingwood Schrieber, dated on 
the ><<•<,, i,| (J a y f February, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-seven (1887) addressed to the Secretary of Department ot Railways 
with reference r.o the inspection of the sections of the Lake St. John Railway 
between the eightieth and ninetieth mile and between the ninetieth and 
hundred! Ii mile 

< !■ Cs there anyl hing in this report about the payment of the subsidy ? — 
A. He -hows work done on the sections between the eightieth and ninetieth 
mile to the amounl of sixty thousand four hundred and seventy-four dollars 
($60,474) and between the ninetieth and hundredth mile, he says that the 

78 



Edgar versus Caron. 

; Tin ling is said to be completed and the track lai< I seven miles, 1ml that Mr. 
lidout is unable to proceed further than the ninety -first mile as the road was 
ompletely blocked with snow. 
Filed as exhibit (LJ 42). 

I also produce certified copy of an Order in Council dated on the eighth 
lav of February, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven 
l s ^7) recommending that authority be given for the payment of sixty 
IfDusand four hundred and seventy-four dollars ($6 ,474). 
Filed as exhibit (L J 43). 

Q. Have you got a report of Mr. Schreiber, elated qn the thirteenth day 
>f July, in the year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven 
1887)? — A. It does not appear to have been here, but there is a synopsis of 
hat report in the journal. From the synopsis it is a report on the inspection 
nade by Mr. Ridout to the one hundred and tenth mile north of St. Raymond, 
||»howing a subsidy earned of five hundred and sixty-one thousand four hundred 
I and seventy dollars ($561,470.00), less previous payments. 

Q. Please give the Order in Council referring to this report? — A. There 

s a certified copy of the Order in Council dated on the twenty-fifth day of 

' August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, being an 

I jiuthority to pay to the Lake St. John Railway Company the amount of one 

iiundred" and three thousand four hundred and seventy-nine dollars ($103,479). 

f|[ may say that these amounts are always subject to any previous payment 

[being deducted. They always give authority to pay the whole amount, but 

jithe accountant deducts the previous payment. From this Order in Council it 

ippears that the chief engineer reported on the thirteenth da} of August 

,1887). 

Filed as exhibit (L J 44). 

Q. Can you find the report of the engineer now ? — A. Yes, I produce 
ind file a report dated on the thirteenth of August, in the year one thousand 
. pight hundred and eighty-seven (1887), signed Collingwood Schreiber, address- 
ed to the Secretary of Railways and Canals, with reference to the one hundred 
land ten miles north of St. Raymond, shewing amount of subsidy earned, five 
jhundred and sixty-one thousand four hundred and seventy dollars ($561,470.00). 
He says that the company have earned this amount of subsidy from which 
should be deducted previous payments. * 

Filed as exhibit (L J 45). 

J also produce letter dated the second day of September, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven (1887), signed J. G. Scott, addressed 
to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, asking for a memo, shewing 
»w the amount of subsidy, one hundred and three thousand four hundred and 
seventy-nine dollars ($103,479.00), has been arrived at. That was referred to 
Mr. Schreiber on the fifth of September, and he wrote a memorandum on the 
back, " Subsidy applicable to the section in question, five hundred and sixty- 
nine thousand five hundred and seventy dollars ($569,570.00), less value of 
work to be made to conform to the specification, three thousand one hundred 
dollars ($3,100) ; work yet to be done, five thousand four hundred dollars 
\400.00) ; total, eight thousand five hundred ($8,500.00), leaving a balance 
of live hundred and sixty-one thousand four hundred and seventy dollars 
( s -561,470.00) ; previous payments to be deducted, four hundred and fifty-seven 
thousand nine hundred and ninety-one dollars ($457,991.00), and balance due 
company, one hundred and three thousand four hundred and seventy-nine 
dollars ($103,479.00)." 

79 



56 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 27.) 



A. 18! 



Filed as exhibit (L J 46). 

I also produce and file letter dated on the sixth day of September, o 
thousand eight hundred and eight-seven (1887), signed by J. G. Scott, sec 
tary to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway, addressed to the Secretary 
the Department of Railways, in which he states that he is directed to encl 
for the information of the department a copy of a notarial agreement betwe 
the Saguenay and Lake St. John Railway Company and the Quebec and Lake 
John Railway Company, by which the former concedes and transfers to t 
Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company any pretension they may have 
a subsidy of ninety-six thousand dollars ($96,000.00), voted at the previo 
Session of the Dominion Parliament, to aid in the construction of railway fr 
Chicoutimi to Lake St. John, or from Lake St. John to Chicoutimi. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 47). 

Q. Will you please continue to file the other documents bearing on t. 
case, and describe them as you have been doing ? — A. I produce and file t 
the following documents : — 

Report from Department of Justice, dated 16th September, 1887, sign 
by A. Power, Acting Deputy Minister of Justice, reporting on the propo 
transfer to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company of the subs' 
granted to the Saguenay and Lake St. John Railway Company. 

Exhibit (L J 48). " 

Report dated 5th October, .887, signed for Collingwood Schreiber, 1 
Francis J. Lynch, with reference to the inspection from the one-hundred 
and tenth mile, from the one hundred and tenth to the one hundred ai 
twentieth mile, and from the one hundred and twentieth to the one hund 
and thirtieth mile. 

Exhibit (L J 49). 

Certified copy of an Order in Council, dated 11th October, 1887, for 
payment of eighty-five thousand eight hundred and fourteen dollars ($85, 
on the construction of the road up to the hundred and thirtieth mile. 

Filed as exhibit (L J 50). 

A memo, initialed by Mr. Schreiber, dated 1st November, 1887, sta 
that the subsidy payment of eighty-five thousand eight hundred and fourt 
dollars was arrived at as follows : — Subsidy applicable irom the Junctio 
St. Raymond, ninety-six thousand dollars ($96,000.00). From the first mil 
the hundred and thirtieth, five hundred and fifty-one thousand two hun 
and eighty-four dollars ($551,284.00). Deductions from fiftieth to sixt 
mile, fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00). From sixtieth to seventieth 
one thousand dollars ($1,000.00). From seventieth to eightieth, six hund 
dollars ($600.00). From one hundred to one hundred and tenth mile, tw 
hundred dollars ($1,200.00). From one hundred and tenth to one hundred 
twentieth mile, fourteen hundred dollars ($1,400.00). From one hundred 
twentieth to one hundred and thirtieth mile, fifteen thousand seven hund 
and twenty dollars ($15,720.00). Total deductions, twenty-one thousand 
hundred and twenty dollars ($21,4^0.00), leaving a balance of six hundred 
twenty-five thousand eight hundred and sixty-four dollars ($625,8n4. 
previously certified, five hundred and forty thousand and fifty dol 
($540,050.00), balance, eighty-five thousand eight hundred and four 
dollars ($85,814.00). 

Filed as exhibit (L J 51). 

A.lso a letter from A. Benoit, Private Secretary to the Minister of Militi 
dated on <li,- fourteenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred an 

80 



Edgar versus Caron. 

-sweiii, ■a&ctere-ssed to tine Secretary of the Department of Railways and 

s, stating Uhat "he is directed by the Hon. Sir A. P. Caron to enclose 

dated 12th instant, from J- <3. Scott, with regard to the claims trans- 

enred, a»d requesting that he would bring it to the notice of the Minister of 

iafrwavs and Canals." A letter faom Mr. Scott is enclosed. 

Exhibit l(U 62). 

A letter signed J. G. Scott, dated 18th November, 18H7, addressed to the 
'Secretary 'i©f the Department of Railways, enclosing copy of transfer in favour 
)f Messrs. Ross<& Co., of Quebec, of the subsidies payable by the Dominion 
lpon elevemana'twenty-threeone hundredths (ll r 2 T, ;i o) miles of road terminating 
Sit Point son Trembles, amounting to fifty-seven thousand nine hundred and 
■i%<eight dollar ($57,958). 
Exhibit .(LJT 53). 

A report signed Collingwood Schreiber, addressed to the Secretary of the 
(Department of -Eailways and Canals, with reference to plan and profile of the 
tmended location sent in for approval of the section between the one hundred 
jmd tenth and one hundred and twentieth miles, Quebec and Lake St. John 
AaS way Company. 
Exhibit (LJ54). 

A letter signed H. J. Beemer, dated 7th January, 1888, addressed to the 
Minister <@f Railways, urging the inspection of the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway between the one hundred and thirtieth and one hundred and fortieth 
niles 

Exhibit (LJ 35). 

A letter dated 16th January, 1888, from Sir Adolphe Caron, Minister 
|)f Militia, addreseed to the Minister of Railways and stating " will you kindly 
•ead the enclosed and let me know what 1 can answer ? " and enclosing a letter 
rom Mr. Scott. 

Q. What is this letter from Mr. Scott? — A. He wants a definite answer 
is to whether the Eailway Department will accept the transfer of the ninety- 
ix thousand dollars ($96,000) made to their company by the Saguenay and 
jake St. John Railway Company. 
Exhibit (LJ 56). 

Q. Can you state by referring to the journal what the reply to this letter 
vas?*— A. Yes, it appears from the journal that the reply sent to Mr. Scott 
n reply to the letter enclosed by Sir A. P. Caron, was that additional legisla- 
tion would be required, before the transfer as made could be accepted. 

Q. And the same reply was sent to Sir A. P. Caron, was it not? — A. 
fes. There was a copy of the letter written to Mr. Scott sent to Sir A. P. 
<aron, I suppose, for his information. 

Q. Will you file the report from Mr. Schreiber dated the 23rd of March, 
890? — A. I file said report addressed to the Secretary of the Department of 
Railways with reference to Mr. Ridout's inspection of sections thirteen and 
ourteen of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway. He states that he has 
efficient information before him to satisfy him that there is work done 
^presenting the full proportion of subsidy on each of these two sections. 

Q. Does he recommend payment? — A. He does not recommend any 
•ayment. 

Q. Are the previous payments stated in this letter ? — A. He does not 
jay previous payments, but he previously reported work done to the amount 
if 8647,284, making the balance $42,720. 
Exhibit (LJ 57). 

81 
27—6 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18i 

I now file copy of Order in Council dated 30th March, 1888, bell 
authority to pay to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company tl 
balance of $42,720 as per chief engineer's report. 

Exhibit (LJ 58). 

I also file certified copy of Order in Council dated the 16th of Februd| 
1889, being authority to pay to Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Comply 
the sum of $19,911, on the report of Chief Engineer of Government Rail wig. 
dated the 7th February, 1889. This report seems to be missing on the pap|| 
but the journal shows that there is such a report and gives a synopsis of it» 

Exhibit (LJ 59). 

I also file report dated 2nd of October, 1889, signed Collingwood Schreiljr. 
addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways. It is "on the I 
pection made by Mr. Ridout and it shews an amount of $748,355.00. He m 
that this sum if payment is to be made is subject to the reduction of I 
amount already paid. Exhibit (LJ 60). 

I also file certified copy of an Order in Council dated 12th October, l£jt 
which gives authority for the payment to the Companv of a sum of $23,48(1 
and $14,960,00. Making a total of $38,440.00. Exhibit (LJ 61). 

I also file report from Frank Ross, President of the Quebec and Lakel 
John Railway, dated the twenty-eighth of October, 1890, being the AnJ 
Report of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway and General Statement! 
the year ending 1889. 

Exhibit (LJ 62). 

I also file a letter from J. G. Scott, dated the 18th of October, lm 
addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, asking if | 
Department will kindly arrange to let them have cheque as soon as convenijj 
in payment of the subsidies of work inspected by Mr. Ridout on the first ; 
second instant. 

Exhibit (LJ 63). 

I also file report dated the 27th of October, 1890, signed Collingw 
Schreiber, addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, vM 
reference to the inspection of the bridge over the St. Charles River, andiit 
states before any subsidy can be paid it is necessary that the company shoj.d 
(inter into a contract under the subsidy act and furnish a complete set of vouchl 
shewing the cost of construction of the bridge. 

Exhibit (LJ 64). 

Q. Now, will you give us a report of the inspection of Mr. Ridout of 1 
27th of October, 1890 ?— A. The leport of Mr. Schreiber on the inspection 
Mr. Ridout cannot be found. It was not among the papers handed over to m 
There is an entry of it in the Journal. This report of Mr. Schreiber' s is c« 
in connection with the inspection of the Lake St. John Railway for operiff 
for tin Hie, and not in connection with the payment of subsidies. 

Q. Have you the report of Mr. Ridout of 30th October, lb90?— A. Tit 
i^ aot here, but, from the journal, Mr. Schreiber reports with reference to i 
Ridout's inspection of the Lake St. John Railway, from St. Raymond top 
150 miles north. He states that the works are not sufficiently advance(pi> 
\\an-;mi the payment on subsidy account. 

I file a mpy of the Order in Council dated 13th of November, 1890, wlw 

tna to be an authority to enter into a contract with the Quebec and Ljfc 

St. John Railway for the bridge over the St. Charles River, and for tw<jk 

miles of that railway from Lorette via Charlesbourg to Quebec. There is k 

drart of the contract and the specification attached. Exhibit (LJ 65). 

82 






Edo-ar versus Caron. 



l s 



I produce u copy of a report signed C. Sclireiber, dated the 13tli of 

ember, 1890, mid addressed to the Department of Railways with reference 
he subsidy applicable to the main line of the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Iway, showing the subsidy represented by work done to be $754,195.00 and 
ting that it' payment is to be made the amount of the previous payments 
uld be deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 66). 

I produce certified copy of an Order in Council, dated 9th January, 1891, 
>eing authority to pay to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company 
>alanee of $20,800.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 67;. 

I produce report signed C. Schreiber, of the 27th January, 1891, shewing 
i subsidy represented by work done $26,300.00 on the 12 miles called the 
Loop Line between Lorette and Quebec. 

Exhibit (LJ 68). 

I also produce report signed C. Schreiber, addressed to the Secretary of 
he Department of Railways, dated 26th January, 1891, with reference to Mr. 
Ridout's inspection of the main line, shewing subsidy represented by work 
lone, $755,595.00. He states that if payment is to be made the amount of 
orevious payments shall be deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 69). 

I also file certified copy of the Order in Council, dated 2nd February, 
1891, being authority to pay the company the sum of $1,400.00 in connection 
with the main line. 

Exhibit (LJ 70). 

Also certified copy of an Order in Council of the same date, 2nd 
February, 1891, in reference to the inspection of the twelve miles of Loop 
Line on the Lake St. John Railway and authority for the payment of 
$26,300.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 71). 

I also file certified copy of an Order in Council, dated 7th February, 1891, 
in connection with the bridge over the River St. Charles, subsidized by Act 
53 Vic, Ch. 2, and being authority for the payment to the company of 
$15,150.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 72). 

I also file a letter dated 19th February, 1891, signed C. Schreiber, addres- 
sed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, giving the particulars with 
{reference to the payment of $26,300.00 on the 12 mile Loop Line between 
iLorette and Quebec. 

Exhibit (LJ 73). 

I also produce certified copy of an Order in Council dated 20th March, 
1891, with reference to the modifying the specifications attached to the con- 
tract with the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway of date 5th December, 1888. 

Exhibit (LJ 74). 

I also produce a certified copy of an Order in Council dated 8th April, 
1891, in connection with modifying the contract and the Order in Council of 
the '28th November, 1890, says to permit payment being made for the said 
items of work as directed, and that authority be given for the payment of the 
sum of $6,700 accordingly. 

Exhibit (LJ 75). 

83 
27—6* 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 182 

I also produce a report signed C. Schreiber, dated the 13th April, 189 
addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, giving the positi<j 
of the subsidy on the Main Line of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railw^ 
and shewing the subsidy represented by work done at this date as a $762,295.0' 
It states that if payment is to be made the amount of previous payments shs 
be deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 76). 

I also produce certified copy of the Order in Council dated 18th Aprj 
1891, being authority to pay $6,700.00 of subsidy due to the Lake St. Jofl 
Railway as per report of the Chief Engineer of Government Railways, dat(! 
13th April. 

Exhibit (LJ 77). . 

I file a report dated 4th May, 1891, signed C. Schreiber, addressed 
the Secretary of the Department of Railways, with reference to bridge ov 
the St. Charles River, stating that the sum of $24,750.00 according to t 
terms of the Order in Council has been earned by the Lake St. John Railw; 
Company in connection with the construction of the St. Charles Bridge, 
the payment is to be made, the amount of previous payments shall be deduct 
that $24,750.00 is 15 per cent, on $165,000.00, the cost of the construction 
the bridge. 

Exhibit (LJ 78). 

I file certified copy of Order in Council dated 18th May, 1891, in conn 
tion with the subsidy granted for the construction of the bridge over tl 
River St. Charles, authorizing the payment to the company of $9,600.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 79). 

I file report dated 27th November, 1891, signed C. Schreiber, addre 
to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, with reference to the ins 
tion of the 12 miles. It states that the road is completed according to 
contracts, with the following exception " the forty thousand gallon water tai 
now in the course of construction, is not complete " and that in the meantir 
they were getting water at the C. P. Railway station. There is no recommend 
tion for any payment. 

Exhibit (LJ 80). • 

Q. "Will you file the first Order in Council that was passed in refere 
to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway ? — A. The first one I find amoi 
the papers is a certified copy of Order in Council, dated 23rd March, 18 
which is with reference to the subsidies granted by 45 Vic, Chap. 1 
$384,000.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 81). 

Q. Have you got with you the contracts that were passed between tj 
< Government of the Dominion of Canada and the Quebec and Lake St. Jo'i 
Railway Company? — A. I have got with me copies of the original contra}. 
The original goes to the Law Clerk, and at the time the originals were mai 
these were copied. They were sent to Mr. C. Schreiber for his guidani 
This contract No. 7119, dated 4th September, 1883, being an agreeme: 
between the < Quebec and Lake St. John Railwav and the Government respe- 
ing tin; subsidy of $384,000.00 granted by 45 Vic, Chap. 15. This contra 
has i he specification attached, and also the Order in Council dated 18J» 
August, 1883, and another Order in Council dated 28th November, 1890 

Exhibit (LJ 82). 

<2. Have you got ony other contracts in relation to the Quebec and La 
St. John Railway? — A. There is an agreement with the Quebec and Lake 

84 



: 



E lg*ar versus ( Jaron. 

■ ohn Railway, dated 10th February, 1886, for a line of railway from the 
inction on the North Shore Railway to St. Raymond, on the condition of the 
>mpany extending their road to a point 50 miles north of St. Ravi hoik I. 
3,200.00 per mile, not exceeding in the whole $96,000.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 83). 

I also produce copy of a contract dated 5th December, 1888, for 30 miles 
Lake St John towards Chicoutimi, and appended are copies of three 
lOrders in Council. 

Exhibit (LJ 84). 

I also file a copy of contract dated 2nd December, 1890, with the com- 
anv for the railway bridge over the St Charles River, and also for twelve 
piles of railway from Lorette to Quebec. The contract is attached to copies 
f Orders in Council. 

Exhibit (LJ 85). 

Q. Is that all the papers you have in connection with the Quebec and 
jake St. John Railway ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Now produce the papers and documents, Orders in Conncil, &c, referr- 
ing to the Temiscouata Railway Company? — A. I produce copy of an Order 
n Council dated 30th of October, 1885, being authority to grant a charter to 
he Temiscouata Railway Company in conformity w r ith the provisions of the Act. 

Exhibit (LJ 86). 

I also produce copy of Order in Council dated 6th October, 1885, giving 
uthority to publish the charter in the Canada Gazette. 

Exhibit (LJ 87). 

I also produce statement from the Temiscouata Railway Company dated 
:7th January, 1886, signed by A. R McDonald, P. Grandbois and J. J. 
;\IcDonald, addressed to the Hon J. H. Pope, Minister of Railway?, being an 
implication for a subsidy. 

Exhibit (LJ 88). 

Also certified copy of Order in Council, dated 1st March, 1886, being an 
jiuthority to enter in an agreement with the New Brunswick Railway Com- 
pany for the control of the line from Riviere du Loup, Riviere Ouelle to 
Edmundston, 

Exhibit (LJ 89). 

Also Order in Council elated 5th April, 1886, draft of agreement and speci- 
fication attached to the Order in Council. 

Exhibit (LJ 90). 

Also a letter from J. J McDonald, dated 31st May, 1886, signed J. J. 
McDonald and P. Grandbois, two of the committee of the board of directors, 
and addressed to the Honourable J. H. Pope, Minister of Railways, giving a 
statement of the assets of the company with reference to their financial ability 
to construct the railway. 

Exhibit (LJ 91). " 

Also report signed by Mr. Schreiber, dated 3rd September, 1887, addressed 
to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, marked certificate No. I , with 
reference to the inspection of the first ten mile section from Riviere du Loup. 
It shows subsidies earned to the amount of $55,946. 

Exhibit (LJ 92). 

I produce certified copy of Order in Council, dated 9th September, 1887, 
being authority to pay to the Temiscouata Railway Company $55,946.00 on 
jaccount of subsidy. 

Exhibit (LJ 93). 

85 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189) 

I also produce report from Mr. Schreiber, dated 26th September, 188 
addressed to the Secretary of the Department of Railways, about the constru 
tion of the first ten miles and the second ten miles, showing the amount 
work done to be $110,194. 

Exhibit (LJ 94). 

I also file certified copy of Order in ( 'ouncil dated 1st October, 1887, bein 
authority to pay the Temiscouata Railway Company the sum of $54,248 
per last report of the chief engineer. 

Exhibit (LJ 95). 

Also report signed C. Schreiber, dated 23rd November, 1887, shewin, 
work done, $155,000, and previously certified, $110,194. 

Exhibit (LJ 96). 

Also a certified copy of the Order in Council dated 28th November, 188 
being authority to pay to the company $44,806 as per chief engineer's repo 
of the 23rd November. 

Exhibit (LJ 97). 

T also produce report dated 10th December, 1887, signed C. Schreibe: 
shewing the amount of subsidy earned, $166,184, less amount previously ce: 
tified $155,000, leaving a balance of $11,184. 

Exhibit (LJ 98). 

Also certified copy of Order in Council dated 17th December, 1887, bein 
authority to pay $11,184. 

Exhibit (LJ 99). 

I also file report signed C. Schreiber, dated 6th February, 1888, shewin 
subsidy represented by work done, $216,629, previously reported, $166,184 
balance, $50,445 or so, in round numbers, $50,500. 

Exhibit (LJ 100). 

I file certified copy of Order in Council dated 8th February, 1888, authorit 
to pay $50,000 to the Temiscouata Railway Company on account of subsidy 

Exhibit (LJ 101). 

I file a petition of A. R. McDonald, President of the Temiscouata Railwa; 
Company, dated 16th of April, 1888, which seems to be signed A. R 
McDonald, President, per J. J McDonald, addressed to the Secretary of th 
Department of Railways and Canals, asking for an increase of subsidy fro: 
*i)'i,000, to $100,000 for the first 30 miles, and applied to the first twenty miles, 

Exhibit (LJ 102). 

I also file list of shareholders of the Temiscouata Railway Company. 
i^ a, letter signed A. R. McDonald, President, addressed to the Secretary 
the Railway Department, dated 17th March, being a list of the original sh 
holders and present shareholders. The original shareholders were P. E 
Grandbois, M.P., Damasse Rossiguol, M.D.L., George Honore Deschenes 
M.P.P., .John J. McDonald, J. Israel Tarte. Charles Bertrand, Win. McCarthy. 
A. R. McDonald, Adolphe Hamel. 

Present >li;ireholders are P. E. Grandbois, M.P., Damasse Rossignol,; 
I reorge Bonor^ Deschenes, John J. McDonald, J. I. Tarte, Charles Bertrand.j 
Win. McCarthy, A. R. McDonald, Hector Cameron, Roger Ryan, Levitej 
Therriault. 

Exhibit (LJ 103). 

1 also tile copy of report of Mr. C. Schreiber, dated 1st June, 1888, signed) 

chreiber, per L. K. Jones. This says the subsidy represented by work! 
done $249,629, previously reported $216,629, balance $33,000. 

Exhibit (LJ 104). 



Edgar versus Caron. 

Also certified copy of Order in Council dated sixth June, one thousand 
-lit hundred and eighty-eight (1888) authority to pav thirty-three thousand 
liars ($33,000). 

Exhibit (LJ 105). 

Also report signed C. Schreiber dated fifth of July, one thousand eight 
i ad red and eighty-eight (1888) which says "Considered that the amount 
ked for can be safely advanced." 

Exhibit (LJ 106)'. 

Also certified copy of Order in Council in connection with this Report 
ited the twenty-fifth of July, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight 
888) which is authority to pav the sum of twenty-one thousand dollars 
21,000). 

Exhibit (LJ 107). 

Also report signed for C. Schreiber, perF. J. Lynch, dated twenty-second 
ugust one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight (1888) which shows 
•oportion of value of work done three hundred and thirty-two thousand one 
mdred and forty-eight dollars ($332,148) previously paid two hundred and 
venty thousand six hundred and eighty-four dollars ($270,684) leaving a 
dance of sixty-one thousand four hundred and sixty-four dollars ($61,464), 

Exhibit (LJ 108). 

Also certified copy of Order in Council dated fifth September, one thousand 
glit hundred and eighty-eight (1888) authority to pay the company the said 
mount. 

Exhibit (LJ 109). 

Also report signed for C. Schreiber, per F. J. Lynch, dated seventeenth 
eptember, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight (1888) showing the 
roportion and value of work done at that date three hundred and forty-two 
lousand one hundred and forty-eight dollars ($342,148) previously reported 
iree hundred and thirty-two thousand one hundred and forty-eight dollars 
£332,148), balance ten thousand dollars ($10,000). 

Exhibit (LJ 110). 

Also certified copy of Order in Council dated twenty-fifth September, one 
jliousand eight hundred and eighty-eight (1888), being authority to pay the 
am ol ten thousand dollars ($10,000). 

Exhibit (LJ 111). 

Also report of Mr. C. Schreiber dated thirteenth November, one thousand 
ght hundred and eighty-eight (1888) addressed to the Secretary of the 
)epartment showing the subsidy represented by work done four hundred and 
ne thousand one hundred and fifty-four dollars ($401,154) previously reported 
hree hundred and forty-two thousand one hundred and forty-eight dollars 
$342,148) balance fifty-nine thousand and six dollars ($59,006). 

Exhibit (LJ 112). 

Also Order in Council dated twenty-third November, one thousand eight 
mndred and ninety-one (189 1 ) for authority to pay this sum. 

Exhibit (LJ 113). 

Also Order in Council dated thirty-first December, one thousand eight 
mndred and eighty-eight (1888) being authority to enter into a contract with 
be Temiscouata Railway Company for the construction of twenty miles from 
^dmundston towards the St. Francis River, approving of the location of the 
)lans and profiles in accordance with the suggestions of the Chief Engineer. 

Exhibit (LJ 114). 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.'..) A. 189i 

Also report signed C. Schreiber dated sixteenth January, one thousan< 
eight hundred and eighty-nine (1889) showing subsidy "by work done fou 
hundred and twelve thousand nine hundred dollars* ($412,900) and states tha 
that amount is subject to the deduction of the sum& previously paid. 

Exhibit (LJ 115). 

Also copy of Order in Council dated twenty-second January, one thousan< 
eight hundred and eighty-nine ( 1 889) for authority to pay the balance 
eleven thousand seven hundred and forty-six dollars ($11,746). 

Exhibit (LJ 116). 

Also report of Mr. C. Schreiber dated tot December, one thousand eigh 
hundred and ninety (1890) with reference to the inspection oi'the first twent; 
miles of the St. Francis branch, in regard to subsidy, and it says the subsi ' 
represented by work done to this date is forty-eight thousand five hundrei 
and twentv dollars ($18,520). 

Exhibit (LJ 117). 

Also copy of Order in Council dated 5th December,, 1890, being authorit 
to pay this sum, $48,520.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 118). 

Also report dated 13th January, 1891, signed C. Schreiber, with referenc 
to the work done on the St. Francis branch, which shows subsidy represented 
by work done $82,770.00 from which previous payments shall be deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 119). 

Also certified copy of Order in Council dated 16th January, 1891, beinj 
authority to pay the sum of $34,250.00 on the St. Francis branch. 

Exhibit (LJ 120). 

Also petition of J. J. McDonald, President of the Temiscouata Railwaj 
Company, dated 21st May, 1891, addressed to the Hon. the Minister of RaiJi 
ways and Canals, asking for a subsidy of $5,000.00 per mile for 12 mil* 
beyond the 20 miles already built. 

Exhibit (LJ 121). 

Also report from C. Schreiber 'dated 13th August, 1891, with referenc; 
to the first twenty miles of the St. Francis branch, showing subsidy reprt 
sented by work done $96,165.00. It states the previous payments shall 
deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 122). 

Also certified copies of Orders in Council dated 2nd September, 1891, fc-j 
authority to pay $13,395.00 in connection with the above report. 

Exhibit (LJ 123). 

Also letter irom J. J. McDonald dated 9th October, 1891, to the Honoui 
able Mackenzie Bo well, acting Minister of Railways, with reference to 
St. Francis branch of the Temiscouata Railway, asking for an additioi 
subsidy of $1,800.00 per mile, as was given to the first 20 miles of the St 
Francis branch. 

Exhibit (LJ 124). 

Also report signed C. Schreiber, dated 9th November, 1891, with refei 
ence to the St. Francis branch ; this says — subsidy represented by work done 
$99,800.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 125). 

Also another report of the 9th November, 1891, with reference to 
St. Francis branch from the 20 to the 31} miles and says— subsidy represenl 
by work done on that line, $37,550.00. 

Exhibit (LJ 126). 

88 



Edgar versus Caron. 

Also Mr. C. Schreiber's report dated 4th December, 1891, on the section 
bf the St. Francis branch from the 20 to the 31-} miles; in which he says 
that the company is entitled to receive the full amount of the subsidy applic- 
able to this section of the railway, namely, $37,600.00, and if any previous 
pa\ ments have been made the amount shall be deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 127). 
. Also report dated 4th December, 1891, signed C. Schreiber, which seems 
to be on the first 20 miles of the St. Francis branch. He states that this 
section is now completed according to the contract, and the company have 
therefore earned the subsidy applicable thereto, 20 miles at $55,000.00 per 
mile $100,000.00, and states that all previous payments shall be deducted. 

Exhibit (LJ 128). 

Also a certified copy of an Order in Council dated 19th December, 1891, 
in connection with the first 20 miles of the St. Francis Branch and also for 
11} miles which gives authority to pay to the company the sum of $41,435.00 
in connection with these two sections. 

Exhibit (LJ 129). 

I have also in my possession copies of contracts furnished to Mr. Schreiber 
by the Law Clerk of the Department. The first No. 8232 dated 21st June, 
1886, with the Temiscouata Railway Company for the construction of 83 miles 
of railway from a point on the Intercolonial Railway to Edmundston 

Contract was attached to Order in Council dated 9th November, 1889, and 
also specification. 

Exhibit (LJ 130). 

I also file contract dated 22nd January, 1889, with the Temiscouata Rail- 
way Company to construct a railway from Edmundston towards the River 
St. Francis. The contract is in connection with a subsidy granted. To this is 
attached a copy of the Order in Council of the 24th December, 1890, and also 
copy of memo, signed by Sir John A. Macdonald, Minister of Railways, dated 
7th January, 1891, giving permission to use " pile tressles " to be approved 
by the chief engineer of the Government railways, and also copy of Order 
in Council dated 21st December 1891 ; copy of Order in Council dated 24th 
December, 1890 ; copy of Order in Council dated 26th October, 1889, and 
memorandum signed by Sir John A. Macdonald, dated 22nd October, 1889, 
and copy of the specification. • 

Exhibit (LJ 131). 

Counsel for Sir A. P. Caron does not examine the witness. 

And further deponent saith not. 

I, Thomas P. Owens, one of the official reporters of the House of Commons, 
being duly sworn, do hereby certify the foregoing deposition to be a true and 
faithful reproduction of my stenographic notes. 



8H 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) 'A. 1893 

Quebec, 22nd September, 1892. 

The Royal Commission to enquire as to the truth or falsity of certau 
charges made against the Honourable Sir Adolphe P. Caron, resumed its sitting 
at the city of Quebec this morning for the taking of evidence in reference t( 
such charges. 

PRESENT : 

The Honourable Adolphe Basile Routhier, 
" Melbourne M. Tait, 

Commissioners. 

James G. Scott, Secretary of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway] 
Company, being duly sworn, deposed as follows : — 

Examined by Mr. Archibald, Q.C., of Counsel for the Crown. 

Q. Mr. Scott, are you the Secretary of the Quebec and Lake St. Job 
Railway Company ? — A. Yes. 

Q. You have been summoned to produce the books showing all the| 
receipts and payments of the Dominion s'ubsidies bv that company ?- 
A. Yes. 

Q. Have you produced the books here in court ? — A. I have. 

Q. Are you also Secretary of the Lake St. John Railway Construction! 
Company of the city of Quebec ? — A. That is not exactly the title of the) 
company. 

Q. What is the title ? — A. The title is the Quebec and Lake St. John| 
Railway Lumbering and Trading Company. 

Q. You are the Secretary of this last mentioned company ? — A. Yes. 

Q. You were summoned to produce the contracts, sub-contracts an( 
agreements in connection with the construction, Or financing for the Quebec 
and Lake St. John Railway, and also minute books and books of account oi 
the company and any books shewing the receipt or transfer of any Dominioi 
subsidy. Have you produced such books ? — A. I have. 

Q. Mr. Scott, you speak of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Lum- 
bering and Trading Company, is that the company which actually constructed) 
the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway ? — A. Yes. 

Q. When or how was that company incorporated? — A. By letters of 
latent of the Provincial Government. 

Q. Do you happen to have a copy of these letters patent ? — A. I hav< 
not got it with me but I can procure it in a very short time. 

Q. Have you at the moment an idea of the date of the incorporation 
that company? — A. Yes, it was in the year one thousand eight hundred ar 
seventy-eight (1878). 

Q. Was it incorporated with any view to contract with the Quebec ai 
Lake St. John Railway Company? — A. Yes, that was the intention. 

Q. Are you in possession of any map or plan showing the line of tl 
Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company's road, because, if you are, 
would probably simplify the examination? — A. I have not got anything 
very good shape, but here is a small map that would snow it. 

Q Was there any portion of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway, that! 
bad been constructed by the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company 
before it was undertaken by the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway 
Lumbering and Trading Co.? — A. The Railway Company was the 

1)0 



Edo-ar versus Caron. 



k s 



riginator of the road, and the Lumbering and Trading Company was the 
ontracting company that undertook to built the road. 

Q. Will you please look at the contract between the Quebec and Lake 
!t. John Railway and the Dominion Government, exhibit (LJ 82) and say 
whether any portion of the road was constructed before that contract ? — A. Yes, 
here were about forty-tw 7 o miles of the road constructed previous to that date. 
Q. Will you please indicate on the small plan which we will file as exhi- 
»it J S 1, the portion constructed before? — A. The portion from the junction 
>f the North Shore Railway to ten miles beyond St. Raymond was cons- 
ructed at that date. 

Q. What is the length of that portion ? — A. Forty-two miles. 
Q. Under what circumstances was that portion built? — A. That was 
milt by the Construction Company under contract between them and the 
Railway Company. 

Q. Have you that contract? — A. I can produce it this afternoon. 
Q. Have you any copy of it among your papers ? — A No, the important 
contract is really the contract with Beemer, and that is the one I brought. 

Q. The important contract is that with Mr. Beemer ; what contract is 
;hat ? — A. It is a contract dated on the tenth day of July, one thousand eight 
lundred and eighty-three (1883). 

Q. Between what parties ? — A. Between what we call the Construction 
Company for short, as it is a long name, and Mr. Beemer. 

Q. I have not heard of that before, I should like however to have the 
ontracts between the Lake St. John Railway Company and the Construction 
Company ? — A. I will produce that. 

Q. When can you produce that? — A. This afternoon. 
Q. In the meantime, Mr. Scott, would you produce the contract which 
ivou said to be an important one between the Construction Company and Mr. 
H. J. lteemer ? — A. When I say the important one, I mean that it embraced 
the larger portion of the road. I produce exhibit marked JS 2, contract of 
;date tenth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-three (1883) 
ibefore Tessier, notary public, between the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway 
'Lumbering and Trading Company, and H. J. Beemer, of the city of Montreal. 
Q. Now, I find here, Mr. Scott, a reference to a subsidy to the Quebec and 
Gosford Railway Company; what is the meaning of that reference? — A. A 
subsidy. 

Q. Yes ? — A. I think not. 

Q. The sum of forty-eight thousand dollars ($48,000) which had been 
paid ? — A. That was a provincial subsidy that had been originally paid to the 
'wooden road, of which this company is the successor. 

Q. What portion of this road, if anjr, was constructed by that particular 
railway company ? — A. Do you mean the wooden road ? 
Q. Yes ? — A. The first ten miles of it. 

Q. On the same line ? — A. Well, pretty near the same line. 
Q. Beginning at the junction of the North Shore with the Lake St. John 
Railway ? — A. It did not exactly begin there, it began in the city, but we 
utilized twelve miles of that location. 

Q. At the time that the subsidy was granted by the Dominion Govern- 
iment, and the company entered into a contract with the Dominion Govern- 
iment, you have already stated that thirty-six miles had been constructed. 
'Have you got the engineer, Mr. Light's report, relating to the matter? — A. 
I The engineer's reports were all filed yesterday. 

91 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189- 

Q. I mean the report relating to the construction of the road which wj 
built before that contract, I don't think Mr. Light's report was filed yesterday 
— A. I cannot recollect if there was any report from Mr. Light. I do w 
know what report you refer to, but I can give you a time table showing tha 
the road was running. 

O. The road was running and equipped? — A. The road was runninJ 
yes. 

Q. I notice by the contract which you have produced as JS 2, that li 
provides for the construction by Beemer, of one hundred and thirty-five mild- 
(135) from the Lake Simon to Lake St. John, the contract has reference ak 
to ten (10) miles between St. Raymond and Lake Simon, has it not? — A. Yefl 

Q. Those ten (10) miles had to be let to whom? — A. McCarron 
Cameron. 

Q. They were partly constructed at the time, were they not? — A. Yes. rc 

Q. Under the contract with McCarron & Cameron, was there any transftj 
of subsidies or anything of that sort provided for? — A. No. 

Q. Then under the contract exhibit JS 2, is there not a transfer of tri 
subsidies to Beemer from St. Raymond, and not from Lake Simon ? — A. Ye ! 

Q So that the whole subsidy referred to in the subsidy contract with tr. 
Dominion Government, exhibit LJ 82, was, by the contract between tr 
Construction Company and Beemer, transferred to Beemer? — A. Yes. 

Q. The contract between the Construction Company and Beemer specific! 
that the company shall use its utmost endeavours to obtain other subsidi<> 
and also to transfer them to Beemer? — A. Yes. 

Q. Did the company carry out that provision? — A. Yes, they did. 

Q. "What other subsidies did they get? — A. There were a number <j 
additional subsidies obtained after that date. 

Q. Do you remember what they were ? — A. Yes, I can specify thenj 
Do you refer to Dominion subsidies only ? 

Q. I suppose Dominion subsidies only? — A. In 1884 a subsidy was oil 
tained from the Dominion for thirty-two (32) miles between the C P. B 
junction and St. Raymond. 

Q. How much?— A. $3,200 a mile or $96,000.00 altogether. In 1881 
an additional subsidy of $1,961.00 per mile was obtained on about 95 miles (j 
difficult work to the north of what was then constructed. 

Q: I suppose that subsidy commenced at the point fifty miles north ( 
St. Raymond ? — A I believe it did. 

Q. "Was that granted in 1886?— A. Yes, it amounted to about $186,000.0(| 
In 1887 a subsidy was granted for a short mileage of nine miles, amountin; 
altogether to $28,800.00. 

Q. What mileage was that? — A. That was for an error in the calcuhl 
lion in the mileage which had been made in previous applications. It we! 
not an additional subsidy, but a subsidy for additional mileage. 

Q. W 1 1 ere did this additional mileage come in? — A. We contended thi! 
it came in at the north end of the road. 

Q. And someone else contended that it came in somewhere else? — A 
The ( i<>\ eminent contended that four miles belonged to the south end of tl { 
road and would not pay the money. 

Q. And never did pay it? — A. They have not so far. 

Q. Why? — A. On account of that pretension. 

< I Well, if it belonged to the south end of the road, and if the road wd 
in a condition to get it, why did you not get it? — A. We thought we should! 

D2 



Edgar versus Caron. 

Q. But you did not get it? — A. We did not. 

(,). Any other subsidies? — A. In 1890 a subsidy was granted for 12 miles 
)f the new line into the city of Lorette. That amounted to $o8,400.00. In 
he same year, 1890, a subsidy was granted towards the construction of a 
nidge over the river St. Charles amounting to $30,000.00. 

Q That is in the immediate vicinity of Quebec? — A. It is right at the 
■ity, a very expensive bridge. 

Q. That bridge is used by more than one railway, is it not? — A. Yes, the 
juebec, Montmorency and Charlevoix Railway use it. 
Q. Is there any other subsidy ? — A. That is all. 

Q. Anything about the subsidies to the Chicoutimi branch ? — A. Yes. 

jln 1888 a transfer was made by the Government of the subsidy of 30 miles 

which had previously been voted to the Saguenay and Lake St. John Railway 

.(Company amounting to $96,000.00, and in 1889 a subsidy was granted for an 

additional 20 miles of that Chicoutimi branch amounting to $64,000.00. 

Q. Is that all?— A. That is all. 

Q. In what years were these transferred subsidies granted by the Govern- 
ment to the original company? — A. It was a couple of years previous. I 
think it must have been about 1886, but I have not got the exact date. 

Q. That was a different company from the Quebec and Lake St. John ? — 
A. Yes, a different company. 

Q That is the company that was incorporated to build the railway from 
Chicoutimi to Lake St. John? — A. Yes, and we bought them out. 

Q. In the first place, you obtained a transfer from them of the subsidies ? 
A. Yes, and everything they had. 

Q. I think you made an effort to have the Government enter into a con- 
tract with your company for the building of that road upon a transfer which 
you received from the Quebec and Saguenay Railway Company ? — A. There 
.was considerable correspondence upon that subject. 

Q. But legislation was required ? — A. The Government would do nothing 
until legislation would be granted. 

Q. So that subsequently by legislation your company was authorized to 
build the road which was originally to be built by the Saguenay and Lake St. 
! John Railway Company ? — A. Yes. 

Q. I notice in exhibit LJ 82, that (2) two subsidies are referred to, one 
of $3fi4,000.00 and one of $80,000.00 ; will you explain these ; they appear to 
be for the same mileage ; will you explain how that is? — A. They are not over 
the same mileage. The $384,000.00 was granted for one hundred and twenty 
miles north of St. Raymond. 

Q. Was it not granted from St. Raymond to Lake St. John ? — A. It was 
hitended to cover the distance from St. Raymond to Lake St. John, but the 
| Government made an error in the mileage which was corrected in the follow- 
■ ing session by the addition of twenty-five miles. 

Q. So that the $80,000.00 over the twenty-five miles is not an additional 
subsidy ? — A. No, it is for a different mileage. 

Q. Now, were there any special contracts or transfers of subsidies between 
the Construction Company and Beemer relating to the subsidies granted after 
; the date of the contract, exhibit JS 2 ?— A. No, that contract covered future 
; subsidies. 

Q. And no writing took place between Beemer and the company relating 
! to the subsidies subsequently granted, or was there any writing ? — A. Except 
I with regard to the Chicoutimi Branch, that is a separate contract. 

93 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189' 

Q. Was there any writing of any kind subsequently relating to subsidii 
modifying or interfering with this contract JS 2 ? — A. No. 

Q. The Construction Company carried out with Beemer the exact term 
of this contract ? — A. Literally. 

Q. In every respect ? — A. In every respect. 

Q. What about the Lorette and Quebec Branch ; was there a subsequer 
contract for that ? — A. No, the contract provided for that ; it was contemplate! 
the time the contract was entered into. 

Q. The only thing then is the Chicoutimi Branch ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Will you produce the contract relating to that branch ? — A. I wil 

Q. Now, the bonds of the road are mentioned also in this contract, J j 
2?— A. Yes. 

Q. It appears to me that there is some ambiguity; will you explain wha 
was intended in relation to bonds ; that is, so far as it concerns the relatiorj 
of the Construction Compauy with Beemer ? — A. It was one of the conside j 
ations of the contract. He was to get $20,000 a mile in bonds. 

Q. That is, the road was to be bonded for $20,000 a mile ? — A. Yes. 

Q. And Beemer was to get this $20,000 a mile or the proceeds of tbj 
bonds ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Has the road been bonded ? — A. Yes. 

Q. For $20,000 a mile ?— A. Yes. 

Q. The bonds have been delivered to Mr. Beemer ? — A. Yes. 

Q. All of them?— A. Yes ; that is, £780,000 sterling. 

Q. That represents $20,000 a mile for how much mileage ? — A. For 19J 
miles. 

Q. The Government only get 186 miles ; how do you get at 190 miles ?- 
A. Well, they did not vote subsidies for the whole mileage. 

Q. The difference then is this last 4 miles before it reaches Roberval ?- 
A. Yes. 

Q. The actual length of road from Roberval to Quebec is 190 miles ? — A 
Yes. 

Q. You refer to the length passing over the North Shore, and in the bas 
of the triangle to Quebec? — A. The mileage is the same in both cases. 

Q. Is the Lorette Branch bonded also ? — A. Yes. 

Q. How many miles have you then bonded ? — A. 190 miles. 

< v >. You say 190 miles altogether? — A. Yes, we have taken up the rail 
on the old line. 

(I That is from Lorette to Quebec, as shown by the two sides of the triar 
gle ; the rails have been taken up? — A Yes, they were taken up as far as th 
C. P. R. Junction, a distance of eight miles. 

< v >. Now, the road runs over the Lorette line ? — A. Yes. 

Q What did you say the total amount of the bonds was ? — A. £780,00' 
Bterling. 

Q. I suppose that may be transferred into our currency at $4.86? — A. 1 
comes within $3000 or $4000 of $20,000 per mile. 

Q. That practically represents $20,000.00 per mile?— A. Yes. 

Q. By ili«' contract, exhibit JS 2, it was provided that $450,000.00 shoul< 
be paid to the Construction Company? — A. Yes. 

Q. I Ins that sum been paid? — A. No. 

Q. No part of it has been paid ? — A. No portion of it. 

Q. Then the contract has not been carried out in its entirety, as you men 
tioned a moment ago?— A. Well, not on his side; that was Mr. Beemer'; 
obligation and he was unable to fulfil it. 

94 



Edgar versus Caron. 

<l But the contract provides for the deposits of the bonds in the hands 
of the trustees ; have these bonds never been deposited in the hands ot the 
hrUBtees? — A. Well, the unsold portion of the bonds are now held for other 
debts than those contemplated by that contract. 

Q. That is a very vague statement concerning them ; I should like to know 
what has become of these bonds. Will you please explain how they have 
been dealt with? — A. Well, a portion of them were sold in London. 

Q. What portion ?— A. About £420,000 sterling. 

Q. By whom ? — A. They were sold by Beemer's agents. 

Q. How are the bonds drawn ; perhaps you may have one of them or a 
blank of one of them ? — A. I have not got one ; they were £100 sterling bonds. 

Q. You said there were £420,000 sterling sold in London ; the rest are 
not sold ?— A. No. 

Q. You say that the amount specified by the contract between the Con- 
struction Company and Beemer to be paid to the Construction Company has 
not been paid. Why is that? — A. Because he has never had funds to do so 
owing to these unsold bonds. 

Q. But the contract specifies that $200,000.00 are to be paid out of the 
moneys derived from the first sale of bonds, to be issued on the first and 
second sections of the road. Why did not the company insist upon the pay- 
ment of this? — A. Because he could not touch the money. 

Q. It seems then that five per cent was to be retained by the company 
upon the progress estimates to pay these bonds ; how does it happen that the 
company did not retain the five per cent ? — A. Not to pay the bonds. 

Q. But to pay the $450,000.00?— A. Towards it. 

Q. Was five per cent retained ? — A. It was not exacted. 

Q. Then you mean to say the contract has not been carried out? — A. In 
that respect, it has not. 

Q. Then, Mr. Scott, you claim that so far as anything has been received 
or realized in connection with this contract, either from subsidies or bonds, 
that it has gone to Mr. Beemer and to Mr. Beemer alone ; do you claim that ? 
— A. It has gone into the work. 

Q. Mr. Beemer was doing the work, was he not ? — A. I do not think 
Mr. Beemer is any richer for it. 

Q. He would be poorer if he had it not ? — A. I suppose he would. 

Q. That is not an exact answer to my question. I want to know whether 
Mr. Beemer has got the whole proceeds both of bonds and subsidies relating 
to that road? — A. Yes, he has had all the subsidies, and he has had all the 
proceeds of all the bonds that were sold. 

Q. The proceeds of all the bonds sold from beginning to end ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Nobody has had a cent but him ? — A. Nobody that I know of has 
ever touched a cent but him. 

Q. You have been pretty active yourself, Mr. Scott, and you must have 
performed an immense amount of labour in connection with this road; how has 
that been remunerated ? — A. I was paid a salary by the company. 

Q. Which company ; by Beemer ? — A. By the Construction Company. 

Q. And although the Construction Company has not had a cent, they still 
pay salaries to officers ? — A. If you look at the contract you will see that 
there is a provision for paying office expenses of $11,000.00 per year. 

Q. This $11,000.00 has been paid, has it? — A. Oh, yes, it has been paid. 

Q. I presume the bonds were issued in favour of the railway company 
itself ? — A. Well, they were made payable to bearer. 

1)5 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 1893! 

Q. But no person's name as the transferee was mentioned in the bond 
—A. No. 

Q. Now, by the 31st clause of contract, exhibit JS 2, it is provided "thd 
when the bonds representing the mileage at $20,000.00 per mile on the firs 
or second sections are about to be negotiated, they shall be deposited in th 
Bank of Montreal, the Quebec Bank, or in the hands of other trustees to b»| 
mutually agreed upon, and shall be handed to the purchaser by the sai(! 
trustee or trustees in exchange for the sum of money agreed to be paid t< 
them.'.' Was that ever done?— A. No. 

Q ; What was really done ? — A. The bonds were put in the hands of th»j 
Clydesdale Bank, in London. The iirst claim on these bonds was the Provin 
cial Government guarantee of interest. 

Q. How was that claim protected ? — A. That claim in part is still un 1 
settled. 

Q. Was anything done to protect that claim of guaranteed interest ? — Aj 
Yes, the bonds were not issued till the guarantee was paid. 

Q. Until the guarantee was paid ? — A. Yes. 

Q. But I understand that this was a guarantee of interest running frod 
year to year. Was any sum deposited to cover that guarantee ? — A. The sun 
was deposited in this way. When first the bonds were issued and taken up 
an amount representing the guarantee of these bonds was retained and hande< 
over to the Government. 

Q. The amount representing that guarantee was handed over to the Pre 
vincial Government ? — A. Yes. 

Q. I presume you have books in which all these matters are entered 
have you ? — A. Yes. 

Q. What amount was taken out of the proceeds of the bonds for th 
purpose of covering the guarantee of interest ? — A. An amount representing 
the guarantee on the portion sold was paid over to the Government. 

Q. How much is that ? — A. About 40 per cent on the face of the bonds 

Q. And that was paid into the hands of the Provincial Government ?— I 
A. Yes. 

Q. Do you know what the bonds sold for ? — A. The}^ . were put on th 
market at 96. 

Q. You don't know whether they realized that or not ? — A. They di<l 
not realize that to Beemer. Of course he had to pay commissions. 

Q. They were sold at 96 and there were commissions to be paid out o 
that?— A. Yes. 

Q. The result of that transaction simply means that Beemer has not pai<j 
$450,000.00 to the Lake St. John Construction Company ?— A. No. 

Q. And they have not exacted payment or tried to get it in any way?— 
A. They could not. 

Q. They did not, you mean; they are very lenient creditors, it appear 
i<> me ? — A. Well, he was to pay out of the bonds and of course they saw th 
position. Tli<\ saw it was impossible for him to pay when he did not sell] 
Ee could noi | >ay what he could not get. 

1 1 W liy < night it to be more impossible at that time than before, when tbM 
made the contract with him. He got 96, you say, for the bonds? — A. Yes, bed 
he did not touch the money. 

Q. Well, who did touch it?— A. Well, £200 000 of it was locked up in | 
Completion Fund for improvements to the road. 

Q. Who locked it up there?— A. The trustees. 

96 



Edgar versus Caron. 

Q. I thought no trustees were appointed? — A. Well, there were trus- 
»r the sterling bonds in London. When the sterling bonds were issued 
u Loudon of course there had to be a trustee deed. 

Q Have you a copy of that deed somewhere ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Then it would seem that if Beemer had build the road to satisfy the 
rovernment and to satisfy your own engineers, it would not satisfy the 
Snglish shareholders. Is that the meaning of the expression ? — A. Well, I 
hink Beemer was a little too liberal in offering to put money into improve- 
ments. 

Q. So Beemer appears to have put up your $450,000.00 for the English 
>ml holders ? — A. It looks so. 

Q. Were there any monetary transactions in detail between the Construc- 
iou Company and Beemer in relating to this work ? 

Counsel for Sir A. P. Caron objects to the question as irrelevant. Question 
withdrawn. 

Q. Will you please produce the books of the Construction Company in 
vhich are entered its transactions concerning the building of the Lake St. 
Tohn Railway ? — A. I produce two cash books and two ledgers of the Con- 
struction Company from its formation up to the presenttime. 

Q. Will you open them at the point where they refer to the matters 
•eferring to the contract with Mr. H. J. Beemer ? — A. I now produce a state- 
nent of moneys received from the Dominion Government in aid of the Quebec 
md Lake St. John Railway Company and entered into the books of account 
)f the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Lumbering and Trading Company. 
This statement covers also the disposal of the money in question " exhibit 
pS 3 ". I also consent that the books be placed in the hands of Mr. A. H. 
rlimsoll, chartered accountant of Montreal, for verification of this state- 
nent. 

Q. I perceive that only the first of those subsidies appears to have been 
)aid (as entered upon the statement which is produced) to Mr. Beemer, for 
he amount of $24,355.55 ?— A. Yes. 

Q. What is the item of $7,644.45 which appears to be here? — A. That 
vas some duty which we owed to the Customs Department at Ottawa. 

Q. Was it owed by the Construction Company or the Lake St. John 
Railway Company ? — A. The Construction Company. 

Q. All of the rest of the subsidies appear to have been paid to Ross & 
Company? — A. Yes. 

Q. How was that ? — A. Because Ross & Company advanced Beemer 
noney ; the amount of the estimates as they were earned by the Engineer 
nonthly. 

Q. What evidence has the Construction Company got to justify them in 
paying these moneys to Ross & Company ; what writing have you ? — A. We 
;iave a transfer of these subsidies by Beemer. 

Q. Will you please produce it ? — A. There were several transfers made 
Tom time to time. I will produce them later. 

Q. Who are Ross & Company ? — A. Well, the late James G. Ross was 
n it. 

Q. Was he sole member of the firm ? — A. I think so. 

Q. Who represents his estate at the present time ? — A. It is represented 
it present by Mr. Frank? Ross, of Quebec. 

Q. You say that this transfer was for advances made by Ross & Companv 
o Beemer ?— A. Yes. 

97 
27-7 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189 

Q. Was the Honourable J. G. Ross in his lifetime a member of the Co' 
struction Company ? — A. Yes. 

Q. And a member of the railway company ? — A. No, not the railwa 
company. 

Q. But he was a member of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railwa 
Construction Company? — A. Yes. 

Q. Have you got any books here which will show who were the met 
bers of the Construction Company? — A. Yes, these books here will show. 

Q. Will you open them at a point to show that, and mention the nam< 
of the shareholders, with the amount of stock held by each of the shar 
holders ? — A. Yes, they are as follows: — John Ross, $25,000 ; James G. Ros 
$25,000 ; William Withall, $25,000 ; James Connolly, $1,250 ; J. B. Renaut 
$5,000; William Ogden, $2,500; Sir A. P. Caron, $2,500. 

By Mr.' Justice Tait : 

Q. From what period was Sir A. P. Caron a shareholder ? — A. Prom tc 
first; he is still a shareholder ; the account was opened in 1879. 

Q. He was a shareholder from the beginning of the company? — A. Ye 

By Mr. Archibald : 

Q. Name the other shareholders? — A. E. Beaudet, $3,000; Honourab 
I. Thibaudeau, $2,500 ; Honourable P. Garneau, $2,000 ; Prudent Vallee, $50 

By Mr. Justice Tait : 

Q. I suppose all these parties were shareholders in the railway company 
A. No, sir; they were not. 

By Mr. Archibald : 

Q. Sir A. P. Caron was a member of the railway company? — A. No, n< 
of the railway company. I wish to correct a statement that was made he] 
yesterday in regard to that matter. All these names were mentioned as bein 
shareholders of the railway company, but that was not correct. 

By Mr. Bisaillon : 

Q. The list was sent to the Government as being shareholders of tl 
railway company? — A. Yes, but it was not correct. 

By Mr. Justice Tait : 

Q. Sir A. P. Caron was not a shareholder of the railway company? — 1 
He was not. 

By Mr. Archibald: 

Q. Look at your letter, dated on the 1st April, 1886, and addressed 
A. I'. Bradley, Secretary of the Railway Department, Ottawa, and purport™ 
to enclose a list of the shareholders of the railway company, and say wheth< 
the List attached to said letter, exhibit " LJ 31," is a correct list of the shar 
holders of (ho Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company? — A.' No, it 
; i(,t correct ; the names beginning . with Ross and ending with Vallee ai 
incorrect ; they are shareholders of the Construction Company, but not of tl 
railway company. The Dames of Ross, Ogden, Withall, John Ross, Connoll; 
Renaud, Beaudet, Caron, ( \ arneau, Thibaudeau and Vallee; these are n< 
shareholders in the railway company, hut they are shareholders in the Co 
struction Company. 

98 



Edgar versus ( 'aron. 

Q. How do you explain that ; where did the error arise ? — A. Well, 

were really the people who were furnishing money to build the railway, 

hey were shareholders in the Construction Company, and it was thought that 

he object of the Government in asking information was to find out who the 

hareholders were who were building the railway. 

Q. "Who thought that? — A. It was thought by the company. 

Q. Now, you headed this letter " Statement of the Department of Rail- 
ways and Canals, Ottawa, of the Shareholders of the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway ;" when you made that were you aware that it was the Quebec and 
Ake St. John Railway Construction Company that these were shareholders 
f? — A. If you notice, that does not say "Railway Company." 

Q. This list was made out purposely ; there was no error about it. You 
nade it purposely to indicate persons interested ? — A. Yes. 

Q. You did not intend to give the Government the exact information 
hey asked for when you sent this ? — A. I do not remember exactly the in- 
ormation they did ask for. It was thought that the object of the Government 
\as to ascertain what gentlemen were actually paying their money into this 
ailway, and that was the object of giving that information ? 

Q. So that when you made that letter out in that form and with that list, 
ou made it after consultation with your board ? — A. I cannot recollect at 
he moment, but I fancy so. 

Q. Now, would you be good enough to give us the names of the share- 
loldersofthe railway company? — A. That is a very lomg story because it 
includes one hundred and one thousand dollars of small shareholders, proba- 
i)ly five or six hundred of them and half of them dead. 

Q. And I suppose their heirs have never looked after the stock ? — A. No. 

Q. Will you prepare a list of the shareholders? — A. I will. 

Q. Who are the important shareholders of the railway ; those having 
arge blocks of stock? — A. There are no large blocks of stocks ; that $101,000 
s composed of small amounts ; the city of Quebec owns a large block of 
stock §450,000. 

Q. But the city of Quebec is not in the Construction Company ? — A. It 
8 in the Railway Company. 

Q. Now, the only names on exhibit (LJ 31) who hold stock in the Rail- 
way Company was the City of Quebec, and small shareholders representing 
>101,000?— A. That is it. 

Q. And none of the others were shareholders in the Railway Company ? 
A.. They were not shareholders in the Railway Company for the amounts stated 
here ; some of them have had a little stock in this Gosford road, of which our 
Company is really a continuation. 

Q. Will you now produce, Mr. Scott, the agreement between the Quebec 
rod Lake St. John Railway Company, and the Quebec and Lake St. John 
Railway, Lumbering and Trading Company ? — A. I will have that contract 
*ent for ; I produce the contract between the Lake St. John Railway Company 
rod Horace Janson Beemer, relating to the Chicoutimi and other branches of 
he Quebec and Lake St. John Railway. 

Q. When you say "other branches" what branches do you refer to? 
A There is one branch to La Tuque on the River St. Maurice, and another 
to Riviere aux Pins settlements, that is not completed. 

Q. And no subsidy has ever been granted ? — A. Well, not for the last. 
There has been a Provincial subsidy granted for the La Tuque Branch. 

Q. But not a Dominion subsidy? — A. Not a Dominion subsidy. 

99 



56 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 189| 

Q. This I presume in reference to the Chicoutimi Branch transfers tlj 
subsidies to Mr. Beeraer as in the other contract? — A. Yes, all the subsidi. 
and all the bonds and all the stock pertaining to that road. 

Q. On the conditions similar to those contained in the contract Exhibl 
(JS 2) ? — A. Yes and in other respects. 

Contract filed as exhibit (JS 4). 

Q. What other contracts have you got? — A. I have the contract wit 
W. H. Stevenson for building 12 miles of road, for which we paid him cas 1 
as he did the work. 

Q. That is the first 12 miles?— A. Yes. 

Contract filed as exhibit (JS 5). 

Q. Thus that covered altogether with Beemer's contract and McCarrcj 
& Cameron's contract and Stevenson's contract, the whole mileage of tli 
road? — A. Yes, with Gibsone's. 

Q. What is Gibsone's? — A. Gibsone's contract is for 16 miles, froi 
Jacques Cartier River to St. Raymond. 

Q. From the end of Stevenson's contract to St; Raymond was Gibson*/ 
contract? — A. Yes. 

Q. And from the end of Gibsone's to Lake Simon was McCarron k Can 
eron's contract? — A. Exactly. 

Q. All of the contracts, with the exception of Beemer's, were for casl 
w T hich the company paid? — A. Yes, cash ; no connection with subsidies at a 

Q. The company in the contract exhibit (JS 2) specified certain dedu 
tions from the subsidies which are transferred to Beemer as being excepte< 
There was the $100,000 from the city of Quebec, and I think $4^,000 whic 
had been already paid to the Gosford road. These subsidies had been co 
lected and paid to these different contractors as cash ? — A. The city of Quebc 
subsidy had been collected on the first section of the road which was built b 
the construction company ; that is to say, the $100,000, the $48,000 was tl 
portion of the provincial subsidy which had been paid on the Gosford woode 
road. 

Q. I should like, Mr. Scott, to be informed as to the names of the Dire 
tors, both of the Quebec and Lake St John Railway Company and of tl 
Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Construction Company? — A. Do yo 
mean the present Directors? 

Q. 1 want to know those who were Directors during the period coverel 
by the Commission, namely, from 1882 to 1891? — A. Do you mean of tli 
construction company? 

Q. i mean of both companies? — A. The directors of the constructs 
company in 1882 were W. Withall, E. Beaudet, Honourable A. P. Caroi 
J. GL Ross, J. B. Renaud, Hon. P. Garneau, Hon. I. Thibaudeau. 

< v >. Were they changed? — A. These directors have been elected ev. 

since, except Renaud. Renaud has been replaced by Gaspard Lemoine, h 

in-law, and Mr. James Rossi think was replaced by his brother-in-lav 

Mr. Frank R 

Q. Who are the directors of the railway company? — A. The directoi 
of the railway company — I state from memory as I have not the books here 
were, in L882, M. \\ . Baby, Simon Peters, J. D. Brousseau, K. P. Vallee, 1 
A. Piddington, T. Ledroit and the Mayor of Quebec, at that date, was a men 
ber - x-ojficio, 

Q. There were none of the directors of the railway companythe same i 
those of the construction company? — A. I think there was not at that time, f 

100 



Edsrar versus ( !aron. 



•© 



<,>. Sir A. P. Caron was not on the railway company? — A. No, he never 
• 

Q. Was the stock of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company 
h be transferred also to Beemer? — A. It was in the case of the Chicoutimi 
mtract, but that he had direct from the railway company ; not in the other 
iise, I think ; I do not remember precisely, but I do not think it was. * 

Q. Would you mind saying what the amount of the subscribed capital 
ock of the Lake St. John Railway Company was? — A. At what date ? 

(J. On the date of its contract with the Dominion Government of 4th 

ember, 1883?— A. About $550,000.00. 

Q. That is subscribed ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Was that paid up ? — A. Yes. 

Q. All of it?— A. Not all of it. 

Q. Is it paid up now ? — A. Yes, sir. 

Q. I asked you in the forenoon whether the list of the shareholders 
f the Lake St. John Railway Company, which you furnished to the 

raiment, was approved by the Board of Directers of the Construction 
Company before being furnished, and you said that you thought it would be ; 
an you ascertain that fact by looking into your Minute Book ? — A. It might 
r might not be entered in the Minute Book. 

Q. Look at the time you sent the list, namely, on the 1st April, 1886 ? 
-A. I do not see any reference to it in the Minute Book. 

Q. Do you think yoi* would have furnished that reply without the 
pproval of the Board? A. No, I do not think I would. 

Q. I suppose you can tell by your minutes whether Sir A. P. Caron was 
•resent at any meeting of the Board which took place about that date ? — A. 
"so, I think Sir A. P. Caron was not present at any meeting of the Board 
iter 1880, with one or two exceptions; occasionally he would come down for 
he summer holidays, and look in if there was a meeting, and shake hands 
vith the gentlemen ; but to do any business, he was not there after 1880. 

Q. That is when he became a member of the Government ? — A. Yes. 

Q. And his residence was transferred to Gttawa ? — A. Yes. 

Q. He then did not attend the meetings regularly after that date ? — A. 
So. practically not at all. 

Q. Except when he happened to be in Quebec ? - A. I think, on one or 
wo occasions, he happened to be in Quebec when meetings were held. He 
•ame in to shake hands with his friends. 

Q. Is his presence at any of these meetings certified in your minutes ? — 
A.. I think so ; whenever he happened to come in, I always put him down as. 
)eing present. # 

Q. I wish you would make a search to find the occasions when he was 
present, so that they may be produced, to see what business was transacted? 
—A. Yes, I will. 

Q. Now, has the Lake St. John Railway Company, itself, got any books 
)f account? — A. Well, they have since 1889; previous to that, practically, 
they had no financial transactions. 

Q. You say " practically ;" what do you mean by practically ; had they 
my at all ?— A. No, they had none at all. 

Q. They were simply a " prete nom " for somebody else, is that it ? — A. I 
did not say that, I said they had no financial transactions. There was the 
minute book, and the minutes of the meetings of the Board were all recorded, 
but they had no cash book. 

101 



5G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 27.) A. 18S 

Q. They had no cash book and no ledger ? — A. No. 

Q. Well, now, the construction company kept a set of books I suppose fro 
an earlier date ? — A. Oh, yes, from the commencement,some time about 187 

Q. Is the first book-keeping referring to the contract of Stevenson ar 
McCarron and Cameron? — A. Exactly. 

Q. And after that had entirely reference to Beemer I suppose ? — A. Ye 
and in connection with the working of the road ; they worked the road in co 
nection with the traffic. 

Q. With respect to the account that you produced, exhibit JS 
which purports to acknowledge the reception of certain amounts of moneys ] 
subsidies, and you state that these have been paid out in the regular way 
the company. As a matter of fact, did these moneys ever reach the compatj 
at all ?— A. Oh, yes. 

Q. In what way ? — A. Through cheque. 

Q. Is it not a fact that the cheques for these subsidies were paid und< 
powers of attorney to certain banks ? — A. In some cases they were. 

Q. In nearly all cases ? — A . I think the larger amounts were lately, bi 
we always put them through our cash book. 

Q. You put them through your cash book ? — A. Yes. 

Q. In what way did you keep them in you cash book ; you never handle 
the money ? — A. It was considered a cash transaction. 

Q. I know, but you never handled the money ? — A. In cases where tl 
money was paid to the Quebec Bank at Ottawa, we did not touch the mone 

Q. Did you touch any of the money ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Will you look through these cheques and see which of the chequ< 
came into the hands of the Construction Company ? — A. The cheque date 
17th November, 1883, for $24,355.55 filed in connection with exhibit D 
came to the company. All these cheques, from exhibit D 2 to exhibit 
23, inclusive, seem to have been paid to the Quebec Bank in Ottawa for Ros 

Q. The first cheque is the only one that came to the hands of the Coi 
struction Company ? — A. Well, there are five cheques here, payable to Fran 
Ross, for the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company, and they are ei 
dorsed " Frank Ross, for the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Company 
These cheques are marked D 18, D 19, D 20, D 22, and D. 23. 

1 1 And were endorsed by Frank Ross ? — A. Yes. 

Q. Did the money for these cheques come into the hands of the Construj 
tion Company? — A. No, because all these subsidies had been transferred 
\ Company ; they touched the money. 

Q. The only money that was touched by the Construction Company w£ 
the $24,355.55?— A. Exactly. 

Q. What did the Construction Company do with that? — A. They pai 
it to Beemer. 

Q. Eave you a cheque to show that? — A. I can show a voucher for it. 

Q. Bui perhaps you have the stub of the cheque? — A. I think it was 

pal cheques, as well as I can remember. 

Q. I would Like to know how it was paid to Beemer? — A. I can get thr 
Information. 

Q, Now, all the other entries in your account relating to these subsidi 
are mere book-keeping entries ? — A. Mere book-keeping entries. 

Q. Will you please produce a statement of the accounts of the Queb 
: ""1 Lake 8t John Railway Trading and Lumbering Company with H. 

102 



Edgar versus ( 'jiron. 

|3eemer, under contract, exhibit (JS 2) ? — A. What kind of a s